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Cautionary Video: Why Leashes and Elevator Doors Don't Mix

The footage below is upsetting, but the dog makes it out OK. Just a small reminder to watch that leash the next time you're in an elevator with your pup.

 |  Mar 27th 2014  |   8 Contributions


If you've ever walked into an elevator with your dog on a leash and you weren't paying attention to the leash, that ends now. This video will knock you to the back of the room. What Tamara Seibert went through is shocking and horrifying, but know that her dog, Vado, came through OK. Seibert posted the elevator surveillance video to her Facebook account to warn others of the danger. 

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Tamara Seibert

It happened on March 2, when Seibert entered the elevator at her Toronto condo with two dogs, her 110-pound Rottweiler, Vado, and a friend's Pit Bull, Tessa. The door closed behind them. Seibert accidentally dropped Vado's nylon leash, and it got stuck in the closing doors. 

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Immediately, Vado flew to the ceiling, dragged up when the elevator began its descent. Seibert rushed to him and then frantically pushed the emergency buttons, but there wasn't a button to stop the elevator. Vado hung from the top of the doors, choking, and Seibert lifted him and clawed at his collar. She broke two fingers in the process. The elevator never stopped -- the buttons only sounded alarms. 

“I thought I was going to watch him die,” Seibert told the Toronto Sun later. “He’s 110 pounds and he was just picked clean off the ground. I just panicked and was going to do whatever I could to get him down."

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The elevator continued dropping, headed from the 11th floor all the way down to the parking garage, her dog choking and struggling the whole way. Finally, the nylon leash snapped, and Vado fell to the ground. The door opened on the parking garage. 

“I was trying to keep it together, but at the end you see me fall to my knees,” she said. “I curled into a little ball in the parking garage floor and bawled my eyes out hysterically. I think (Vado) thinks he maybe did something bad, I posted the next day of him running around a backyard. But he was never afraid to go back in the elevator. I think he knows no one was trying to hurt him. 

Watch the shocking footage: 

Seibert asked building managers for a copy of the minute-long footage and posted it to her Facebook page, where it caught fire. Seibert said she wanted to warn others of the danger.

“I just want people to be careful -- I’ve heard so many horror stories from different people,” she said. “It could be a child’s scarf, a leash or a long dress.”

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Toronto Animal Services weighed in on the leash safety, saying people should be aware on elevators and that pets should never be taken on escalators.

“Leash safety is an important consideration," animal services veterinarian Esther Attard told the Sun. "The leash should never be wrapped around your hand/arm, it should be held in your hand with your dog at a comfortable distance for the environment you are in. The end of the leash should be folded over and held in your other hand so it is not dangling. This will prevent it from getting caught.” 

And when you enter an elevator, keep a tight hand on your leash. 

Via the Toronto Sun

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