Lost Dog Saves A Life

Ever wonder if karma plays a role in life? You know, do something bad and something bad will happen to you. Take, for instance, yesterday....

Horst Hoefinger  |  Aug 12th 2009


Ever wonder if karma plays a role in life? You know, do something bad and something bad will happen to you.

Take, for instance, yesterday. I knew I needed to clean out the turd-laden kitty litter box but put it off. Later, when it was time to feed the kids (Bo, Copper and Logan), I came upon a nice wet poo of the feline variety. Moose sat in the corner with a look that said, “Take that!”

When I went to throw the kitty litter box into the garbage bag, I misjudged it and dumped the whole shebang on the floor. Hey, I had it coming.

So I was happy to see that it goes the other way too.

What follows is a touching tale of a lost dog, a found family and karmic payback.

PORT TAMPA, Fla. Yolanda Segovia heard a knock on her door one morning, just before 8 a.m.

Her neighbor was on the porch, with a dog and a story.

Stacey Savige had found the little dog in front of an elementary school. He wasn’t very big, looked like some sort of terrier. Burrs clung to his belly. His honey fur was caked in mud.

He didn’t have a collar. Stacey had taken him to the vet and he didn’t have a chip, either.

Now Stacey had to go to work. Could Yolanda keep him?

“You can leave the dog here,” Yolanda told Stacey. “But just for today.”

They took photos of the dog and made a FOUND flier. Stacey ran off 4,000 color copies. She and Yolanda stuffed mailboxes, put ads on Craigslist.

Yolanda took her boys to the dollar store and bought a collar, leash, ball and brown bed. Her 10-year-old, Azaiah, decided to call the dog RaeLee, pronounced “Riley.” He said he had heard it on TV. All afternoon, he walked the dog, threw the ball, laughed while the dog licked his face.

“Don’t fall in love with him,” Yolanda kept warning.

Her elder son, Christian, 21, watched through the window. Christian has Down syndrome and an array of other ailments. He has had heart surgery, a kidney transplant. He can’t speak or bathe himself.

That night, when the boys climbed into their bunk beds, the dog dragged his new bed from Yolanda’s living room, down the long hall, into their room.

Four days later, they still had the dog. He was starting to answer to his new name.

He loved roughhousing with Azaiah, knew to be gentle with Christian. He almost never barked.

On Saturday, Azaiah went to his dad’s house. Christian retreated to his room to watch a Barney video. The dog dozed beside him.

Yolanda had just stepped onto her porch to water the plants when the dog flung himself into the screen door, barking madly.

As she opened the door, the dog sprinted across the living room, into the boys’ room.

Yolanda screamed. Christian was slumped over, his body writhing in a seizure, blood streaming from his nose and mouth.

The dog ran to the boy, still yelping. But as soon as Yolanda bent to cradle her son, the dog went silent.

“If he hadn’t come to get me,” Yolanda told Stacey later, “the neurologist said Christian would have choked on his own blood and died.”

Since no one had claimed the dog, Yolanda decided to keep him.

You’ll have to read the rest at this link to find out how this story ends. Let’s just say I could roast marshmallows on my heart right about now.

Photo courtesy of the Associated Press.