Can neutering stop indoor wetting for dogs?

 |  Oct 5th 2006  |   0 Contributions


I adopted a homeless mixed Terrier (Benji) last year... a little boy who
has not been neutered. He has a habit of hiking his leg and wetting in
the house (but not when I can catch him) on anything: chairs, trash
cans, boxes, whatever. I don't know how old he is. Do you think
having him neutered will stop this behavior, or has he adopted a
habit that will continue?

Barbara
New Lebanon, OH

Neutering your dog may help with this problem. Intact male dogs have high levels of testosterone in their systems. Testosterone can increase the drive to mark territory by urinating. Neutering your dog may reduce this drive, which may relieve the problem.

However, be aware that issues other than high testosterone levels could be playing a role in your situation. Simply put, your dog could have housetraining problems which may not respond to neutering.

My advice is to neuter your dog. As well, implement a back-to-the-basics housetraining refresher program. In your case, I recommend that you keep your dog confined to a small area (such as a comfortable run or crate, or a small room containing all of his necessities) when he is not under direct supervision. Dogs are unlikely to soil a small, confined area. Restricting access to the house also limits the damage he can do when you are not home.

Allow your dog out of his area only when you can supervise him and ensure that he does not urinate in the house. It may be necessary to keep him on a leash at first, even when he is inside. Take him out frequently so that he has ample opportunity to relieve himself appropriately.

As your dog learns appropriate urination habits and builds trust, you can become less stringent about keeping him confined. It is normal for neutered male dogs to mark territory. However, your goal should be for him to do this only when he is outside.

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