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Insulin Patches Might Some Day Eliminate the Need for Injections

Diabetic cats and dogs often must take insulin. The types of insulin used in cats and dogs generally must be injected by the owners, and...

Dr. Eric Barchas  |  Apr 21st 2010


Diabetic cats and dogs often must take insulin. The types of insulin used in cats and dogs generally must be injected by the owners, and most owners do not enjoy the task. Currently available insulins also are tricky to store and handle. An Australian newspaper reports that insulin patches, similar to those available for people, may soon eliminate the need for daily insulin injections in diabetic pets. An added benefit: the patches may provide more consistent and reliable dosing.

Prescription medications can be tremendously beneficial to pets when used properly. Improper use, however, can have the opposite effect. The FDA has issued a list of 10 questions to ask your vet whenever medications are prescribed. These questions will help to ensure that your pet benefits rather than suffers.

The Numbers Game, by Blastland and Dilnot, did a great job of explaining why most “cancer clusters” simply aren’t. Therefore I was a bit skeptical when I read a story about a possible animal cancer cluster in Florida. The stories are tragic whether there is a true cluster or the cases are random.

Vaccination has drastically reduced cases of distemper in dogs. However, the disease still exists in wild animals. An article in the San Jose Mercury News describes the increasing incidence of distemper in Los Angeles area raccoons. An aside: Merc articles always seem to trigger those horrifically annoying Netflix popunder ads. Netflix, I love your service but I hate those annoying ads. Knock it off, please.

The Vet Blog has been following this one from the start. The Massachusetts debarking bill is now awaiting the Governor’s signature. Will he sign it?