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Fostering?

This is a special section for dogs needing new homes and for inspiring stories of dogs that have found their furever home through Dogster or through the love and energy of rescuers. This is also the place to discuss shelters, rescue organizations, rescue strategies, issues, solutions, etc. and how we can all help in this critical endeavor. Remember that we are all here for the love of dog! If you are posting about a dog that needs a new home, please put your location in the topic of your thread so those close by can find you! Make sure to check out Dogster's dog adoption center!

  
Bella

1240031
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 22, '12 1:51pm PST 
A shelter needs a foster home for a sweet pup and we're debating if it is for us, as we've considered having two dogs, but haven't been willing to take the plunge. We were thinking this is a way to help a dog who doesn't do well with shelters and to test out two dogs.

Anyone have any pros or cons to the fostering process?
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Bandit- (Adopted!)

1204330
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 23, '12 7:34pm PST 
There are a few links that discuss the pros and cons. Here's some info from dogster http://www.dogster.com/dog-adoption/dog-fostering Fostering can be a lot of work. Many dogs in rescue have issues, either physical or behavior wise. You don't need to be a dog training expert to solve every issue, but you need to try to take care of the basics. You will probably need to transport as needed to the Vet which will be the rescue's Vet which may not be close to you. In our case, we supply most of the food and treats, the rescue pays the Vet bills. Any rescue expenses you have are tax deductable though. There's the chance the foster won't get along with your other dogs or other household members. Perhaps the biggest con is having to let go when they are adopted.

The pro's, you are responsible for saving the life of these dogs. Without rescues and the foster families these dogs would in many cases be put down or live a life in a shelter which can cause all sorts of mental problems. You are also helping provide a worth while companion for the people who adopt. Your hard work helps make that happen and by knowing the dog's quirks, you can help ensure the dog goes to a home that is a good fit. If you read Bandit's diary, you can see that he's a ladies dog and doesn't like men so much unless a woman is home. So being adopted by a nice retired lady is a good fit for him (Bandit was adopted today!!!). A shelter wouldn't know a dog well enough to be able to make that determination and so they could go to the wrong home and end up back at the shelter after a short time.
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