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Peeing in the house?

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Natcho

LabraDORK
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 24, '12 6:36pm PST 
My friend has a 3 year old Bichon Frise, the most obidien dog I've met. Super smart, a bit on the nervous side, but an overall good dog.
Except he has one set back, he pees in the house! He isn't neutered either. Recently he's been confined to the kitchen because they moved into the house and she doesn't want him peeing all over the house. It isn't really far to him that he's stuck in the kitchen all day.
Is it because he isn't neutered? No one seems to believe me when I say that might be the problem. Maybe if I show them this from from dog experts they would agree with me...

Thanks! wave
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 25, '12 12:16am PST 
Has he ever been housetrained or is this a new behavior?

If he's never been properly housetrained then it doesn't matter if he's intact or neutered. Have they tried crating the dog when they're not supervising him? A crate can be an excellent housebreaking tool. Keeping the dog tethered to someone when they're home is a good way to keep him from having accidents in the house when not crated.

If he used to be fine in the house and this is a new behavior, my first inclination would be to have the dog checked by the vet for a medical issue like a UTI. If they just moved into a new house and that's when the peeing started, it may also be caused by stress brought on by the move.

I would not think that he's peeing in the house because he's intact. Intact males can be housetrained just as well as neutered males.

Edited by author Wed Jan 25, '12 12:28am PST

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Natcho

LabraDORK
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 25, '12 8:40am PST 
He's leashed to a cupboard in the kitchen, home or not. Which I don't think is fair. They can let him out 100 times a day, but he will ALWAYS go pee in the house. He just walks off when you're not paying attention and pees. It seems like he understands what he's doing wrong because he becomes shy even before you know he's peed..
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UCH Onyx TT,- CGC

Do you even- lift?
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 25, '12 9:56am PST 
So he's never been housetrained then?

The idea that the dog understands what they did wrong is a common misconception. The dog knows that pee on the floor will make his humans angry but he doesn't understand why it makes them angry. Dogs live in the moment so unless they catch him in the act of peeing, it's no use correcting him because he doesn't associate pee on the floor with his act of peeing on the floor.

He really sounds like he just needs to be properly housetrained. I would advise them to get a correctly sized crate (a crate that's too large won't work) and start crate training the dog. A crate is one of the fastest ways to housebreak a dog.

He just walks off when you're not paying attention and pees.

That's why tethering is such a great concept. The dog can't wander off while tethered to a person. Whenever he isn't crated, he needs to be tethered. They should be taking him out often (immediately after being let out of the crate, after sleeping, after eating, after exercise) and praising with treats and rewards anytime he goes outside. If he goes in the house, they should interrupt him (because if he's tethered to them they can't miss it) and calmly take him outside. When he finishes going outside, big party with lots of praise.

If the dog has been allowed to pee in the house for three years, they should expect housebreaking to take longer than normal because he's not just learning a new behavior, he's unlearning an old one. But if they go back to the basics and keep eyes on the dog at all times, they will be able to housebreak him.

Edited by author Wed Jan 25, '12 10:09am PST

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Peach

Etsy's Pooch &- Puddy mascot!
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 25, '12 6:02pm PST 
Neutering would only affect hormonal marking behaviour, which would be him hiking his leg on choice objects (Generally around the edges of his territory) and piddling, to keep other dogs away. Dogs often mark without a hormonal reason, too, just to say, "This thing is mine."

Onyx is right: this dog was never housetrained. It's going to be hard to re-train him. Try getting your friends the book "Housetraining for Dummies". Hopefully they won't be offended by it, but it will be information from a "professional" or "expert", in an easy-to-understand format, that will back up everything Onyx just said =) I'm a huge fan of tethering, crating, established potty schedules, and bells. Peach is learning how to ring her bells to let us know she has to go outside and master the outdoors, it's very easy for almost any dog to catch on to. Perhaps the book and some doggie door bells? You can find them under the brand "Poochie Bells", also on Etsy by the same tag.
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♥Band- it - CGC♥

Back off!!!!- Thats MY momma!
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 25, '12 10:47pm PST 
I dont believe being neutered or unneutered has anything to do with it. Unless there is another dog/pet in the house they feel they need to compete with. My Bandit has been peeing in the house since we got our pug harley and he was neutered at 5 mths old. I know why he pees he feels he has to compete with my Pug harley for being the top man in the house. We tried cautching him and startling him and then putting him out tried reconditioning him. NOTHING worked. I have noticed it is more likley to happen in the more sensitive dogs as they feel they need to claim their space. The only way I have learned to live with it, is when he is inside he is wearing a belly band or what we call a "wrap." Tell them to look into belly bands you can get them at petsmart/petco and just get cheap pads or panty liners to fill them.
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JR 1995-July- 31, 2013

I'm just a wild- and crazy guy!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 27, '12 3:46pm PST 
I know there are some who are not in favor of using 'belly bands' but JR is a 17 year old marker who I haven't been able to break of this habit. I know many dogs have been dumped at the shelter for marking or not being house trained. I made a commitment to JR when I adopted him and I mean to see it through to the end. The belly bands save the carpet and furniture and keep me from tearing out my hair. Now for those who say the belly bands will cause UTI's, JR has been wearing the belly bands for the 7 years he has been with me and has never had a UTI. I DO change the soiled pads often, just like you would do for a baby in a diaper and I keep his underbelly clean. Incidentally, I tried the tethering approach and the little stinker peed on my foot.laugh out loudlaugh out loud
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Parsons- Pearl of- Twenty Nine- P

Spreading- Sunshine &- Sweetness, :)
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 30, '12 9:11pm PST 
Onyx and Peach are absolutly correct. If this is a new behavior your friend needs to have him checked for a UTI or any other health issue. The suggested book "House Training for Dummies" is a life saver. Easy to read and lists step by step ways to train as well as easy explanations as to why dogs do the things they do. Sometimes just understanding their language is enough to get you through the difficult potty training effort. Tethering may sound radical and exhausting - it is. But it is the only way to have your eye on the pup at all times. Yes, he may start to pee while tethered to them, but that is an opportunity to interrupt him and show him the correct place, then reward him. They may also have to set a schedule at night, say, every two hours, to take him out, then increase the time over the weeks. Basically starting out as if he were a puppy. I spent two weeks tethered to Parsons. She learned to use the bells as well. It was not easy, but the reward now is very worth what we all went through back then.
Good luck!
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Parsons- Pearl of- Twenty Nine- P

Spreading- Sunshine &- Sweetness, :)
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 30, '12 9:18pm PST 
Onyx and Peach are absolutly correct. If this is a new behavior your friend needs to have him checked for a UTI or any other health issue. The suggested book "House Training for Dummies" is a life saver. Easy to read and lists step by step ways to train as well as easy explanations as to why dogs do the things they do. Sometimes just understanding their language is enough to get you through the difficult potty training effort. Tethering may sound radical and exhausting - it is. But it is the only way to have your eye on the pup at all times. Yes, he may start to pee while tethered to them, but that is an opportunity to interrupt him and show him the correct place, then reward him. They may also have to set a schedule at night, say, every two hours, to take him out, then increase the time over the weeks. Basically starting out as if he were a puppy. I spent two weeks tethered to Parsons. She learned to use the bells as well. It was not easy, but the reward now is very worth what we all went through back then.
Good luck!
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Member Since
04/18/2010
 
 
Barked: Thu Aug 16, '12 9:57pm PST 
I have a 3 year old terrier mix girl dog that also goes potty in our house. I was told what she is doing is marking her territory. I do also have a 13 year old sheltie/aussie girl dog. I know when my 13 year old goes potty outside the 3 year old does have then go potty on top of the other on the ground. Sometimes my 3 year old does pretty good about not going in the house but it doesn't last to long. I have bought the spray from Pet Smart called, " No More Marking". It worked for awhile. she started again. Now I will have to clean the carpets again and spray it again and see how long it will last. Marking her territory is the only answer that I was ever given for the problem that I have with my dog. I hope it helps some. Otherwise she is a wonderful little girl who I got from a rescue shelter who I love very much. Our dogs are just like our kids. Can't always figure them out but we just keep loving them.
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