GO!

can a surface tumor be removed just with Local?

This forum is for dog lovers seeking everyday advice and suggestions on health-related issues. Remember, however, that advice on a public forum simply can't be a substitute for proper medical attention. Only your vet can say assuredly what is best for your dog.

  
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Layla

Classic Beauty
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 6:19am PST 
I got to thinking, if a tumor is not attached to bone or anything, shouldn't it be able to be removed without putting the dog fully under? I would think that the relaxing shots and a local block would be sufficient and safer if a dog is prone to tumors and has to have a lot removed in their life.

I ask because I am planning on buying that insurance and I want to get any and all tumors removed from the boxers since they are prone to tumors and cancer and I would want them all checked out, but if they were not attached to bone or anything, I wouldn't want them to keep having full anesthesia.

Thanksway to go
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Lilith

I'm a trilingual- dog!
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 8:22am PST 
I'm not a vet, but from our experiences, they do have to be fully anesthetized during tumor removal and even teeth cleaning. I don't think that the dog quite understands what's going on, so even though it can't feel any pain from the local, it doesn't stop it from moving about or struggling. It's just not a safe operating situation if that were to happen.
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Jessica CGC

Will work for- food
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 8:39am PST 
I think Lilith's right. The vets might HAVE to for legal reason also to follow policy, and for the dog's safety and in case of any complications. I was at the ER and my cat needed to get an MRI but she was too sick for anesthesia and they wouldn't do it without putting her under.

eta, hey layla what about going back to the raw food diet thing? I mean of course it's your money and i hope this isn't sounding rude. to me, i want to spend my money on nutrition instead of insurance because the better nutrition means you will need the insurance less, i believe anyway.

Edited by author Fri May 1, '09 8:41am PST

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Rosalita Lola "Rosie"

Love is never- being told you'- naughty!
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 8:53am PST 
It wouldn't be safe for either the dog or vet to use local anaesthetic - they aren't like us - they have no idea what's going on and a vet would want to make sure it went smoothly with no fuss from the dog.
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Nikki CGC- RLI- 1/09/01-08/1- 8/09

A Work In- Progress
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 10:10am PST 
On March 10th Nikki had a small mammary carcinoma removed from her belly using just a local anesthetic though they gave her a very mild sedative just so she didn't get upset. She was just a little woozy but was awake the whole time.

She had dissovlable stitches under the skin as well as 10 stitches on the surface that my husband removed 10 days later.
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Rosalita Lola "Rosie"

Love is never- being told you'- naughty!
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 10:40am PST 
Now that's different, giving a sedative . Glad the operation went well.

I guess it depends on the vet and what they are happy with.
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Layla

Classic Beauty
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 11:44am PST 
A sedative is what I meant when I said relaxing stuff haha. thanks for the right word!

They give that to them anyway before putting them under and I just thought that since it only took like 15 minutes to remove Layla's histiocytoma that it would be a possibility.
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Bingley

556283
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 11:46am PST 
It depends on the size of the tumor, the location, and the demeanor of the dog. Tumors you would think are just surface tumors can go pretty deep. I would also wonder how safe it would be to sedate your boxers. Boxers are brachycephalic and you have to be very careful that they don't obstruct their airway during sedation.
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Hershey Bear

Silly old bear
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 11:54am PST 
It also depends on the dog. From experience as a tech, there are very, very few dogs that you can give a local to for lump removal. A dog would have to be very still in order to remove the lump(s) and even with mild sedation and a local, a dog will still move around.

Edited by author Fri May 1, '09 11:54am PST

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Nikki CGC- RLI- 1/09/01-08/1- 8/09

A Work In- Progress
 
 
Barked: Fri May 1, '09 12:11pm PST 
Well I told my vet at the time, "Hey! Nikki takes her CGC test on Monday so you can't traumatize her!" He said he knew what he was doing and would know when to sedate her if need be. She ended up sedated but at least she didn't have to go under general. The lump was in her mammary area (of course if its a mammary carcinoma) it was pretty small and seemed pretty close to the surface and that is why he chose to do it with just a local. Worked for us!

Of course now she has lymphoma.... so there's nothing to do with that surgically anyway. cry
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