Postings by Mulder

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Raw Food Diet > Starting a puppy on raw, hasn't been going well?
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 1, '15 6:55am PST 
First of all, ignore the people who keep breaking forum rules and coming to the RAW boards to bash raw. They know they shouldn't be doing it, but for some reason refuse to learn and continue on their freaky pro-Science Diet, anti-good sense campaign.

Second, 7 weeks was too young for the breeder to have released the dog to you. Unless they had raw weaned the pups themselves, it probably was also a bad move to immediately have switched to raw right after buying the puppy. Large amounts of change all at once do not usually go over well with extremely young puppies.

Damage is done on that front, so what I would do going forward is this:

Either pick raw or kibble, stop going back and forth until you get the digestion issues sorted. Obviously I would say stick with the raw, but do whichever you're going to have the easier time with. Its not about digestion rates or bad combinations, its about too much too soon.

IF you're going to go raw, you're going to need to cut 90% of what you're doing. Throwing all of that stuff together right off the bat (cottage cheese, coconut oil, egg, etc) is likely a portion of your problem. Get some bone-in chicken (drumsticks are usually a good starting point for younger pups), and provided it is RAW, mix in some of the goat's milk. If not, you can try a small bit of (ideally fresh) Kefir or even a straight probiotic supplement to get them back on the right track. Feed only this for 3-4 days, watching for consistency of stool. Once stools have normalized, you can slowly start adding other ingredients back into the mix. Where you start with that is up to you, but I would work on organs (liver) next, as those are essential for a balanced raw diet while the other things are generally not.
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» There has since been -1 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Today 6:55 am

Food & Nutrition > Gassy pups on Blue Buffalo Wilderness.
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 23, '15 3:29pm PST 
I know a lot of vets/etc endorse free feeding for puppies under a certain age, but personally, I would ditch the "let them eat as much as they want from the pan" idea and move to measured feedings.

Eating too much, especially too quickly, is almost always the culprit for digestive upset, especially on richer foods.

By 8 weeks there's no reason to continue free feeding. When I weaned my litter of rescue puppies, the moment they were on solids I was portioning. Everyone ate separate, on appropriate rations at appropriate intervals throughout the day.

Also, me personally here, strongly dislike feeding from the same bowl. It creates too much competition, which at best means gulping food too quickly, or at worse creating resource guarding issues later on down the line.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Mon 3:29 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > designer breeds

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 20, '15 11:45am PST 
Ah, haha, sorry laugh out loud
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Sun 9:28 am


Choosing the Right Dog > designer breeds

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 20, '15 8:34am PST 
Sorry, HD meaning hip dysplasia.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Sun 9:28 am


Choosing the Right Dog > designer breeds

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 20, '15 7:55am PST 
LMAO, ignore Jasper Missy. They've been to just about every board on this forum spreading their meaningless, baseless drivel.

True "mutts", complete crosses of crosses, probably are healthier than most purebred dogs.

But "designer" dogs share the SAME health problems that most purebreds have, because they are direct crosses OF those breeds! Just because you add a little genetic diversity, does NOT mean you are somehow magically preventing the inheritance of HEREDITARY diseases and ailments.

Breed a Poodle with HD to a Lab with HD... guess what you're going to get.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Sun 9:28 am

Raw Food Diet > Bloody stool on raw - please help!
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 15, '15 4:08pm PST 
Several things can cause blood in the stool.

Best case scenario, his body had a bad reaction to the chicken. If there was significant irritation in the gut, that could cause hematochezia (bloody stool). Could be an allergy, could have been because of the sudden change. Only way to know for sure is pull the chicken, go back to pork, and see what happens.

Worse case is some sort of obstruction or puncture. No way to know that without a vet visit.

Personally, if he's acting normal, I'd do as you are and fast for a couple of meals. If things improve, go back to the pork and very slowly reintroduce the chicken (else cut it entirely). If not, to the vet.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Ember FDX, Feb 17 12:11 am


Food & Nutrition > Gassy pups on Blue Buffalo Wilderness.

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 15, '15 3:54pm PST 
How much are you feeding everyone?
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Mon 3:29 pm


Behavior & Training > Behavior Issues

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 11, '15 6:26pm PST 
Oh for cripe's sake, you're just spilling out this gooberfied generic bull everywhere now, aren't you Jasper?

First, Malinois are NOT known for dog aggression, and NOT generally human aggressive in the genetic sense. They are what I would call a "limited window" breed... you gotta get in there and socialize the crap out of them within their crucial socialization periods, else you're going to have a big problem on your hands.

Which is why the advise of "get him out and socialize him" is terrible, sappy advise. The time to "socialize" is over, it ended around 14 months of age after his final fear impact period. Whatever went wrong during that time, the damage is done... just getting him out and "socializing" him wont do a darn thing, save for maybe make things WORSE if his handling is poor.

No, now is the time for modification. Not "socializing", not "training", someone needs to get into this dog's headspace and change how he feels about his world, else he's going to need to get out of the situation he's in and go into the hands of someone capable of giving him a better environment.

The kids are a big deal here. He's bitten you, he growls and retreats from your children. This is BAD, and this can escalate. Kids are a huge variable in these sort of issues, as kids are highly unpredictable... especially when its your own kids. I know most people don't believe that, but BECAUSE they are living every day in the house with the dog, interacting with him (regardless of how on the razor's edge those interactions may be), people build up this false sense of security. They feel their kids just somehow "know" how to deal with the dog because they've been with them for long enough to understand what does and does not trigger something from him... which is a false assumption. Kids don't know how to read a dog, even kids that are GREAT and well behaved around them, cannot possibly understand the very intricate and complex signals that dogs give off. Heck, most ADULT humans don't get them either! So having him acting this way around your kids is a big deal. He is uncomfortable around them, and that needs to change. You can't just get rid of your kids, so you're going to have to do 4 years worth of counter-conditioning to get somewhere here, but this needs to be addressed first and foremost.

As some other notes:

You said:
The more I leash correct the more he goes out of control, pinch collar works when he's in a calmer state, but gets worse as he intensifies.

What you are essentially doing, is building drive in the dog by doing this. You are agitating him, which is amping him up and making things escalate. Jasper said chokes, prongs, and e-collars don't work... this is false. They do not work when they are used improperly, and this is a perfect example of that. If you're going to correct the dog, it needs to mean something. I'm not trying to say you need to get tough on the dog, "mean something" doesn't mean you spin him around like a helicopter or give yourself whiplash yanking his throat back. What it DOES mean, is you have to find at what threshold he is able to take a correction without shutting down, but that isn't minor enough that its going to build up frustration and start amping up his drive. Your timing also needs to be perfect. Not "kinda ok", perfect. This is why its better to not take on these sort of issues yourself... MOST people do not have perfect timing when correcting a dog, and this leads to many other issues. You cannot correct him once he's already started reacting, and you have to be the one who's eye is sharp enough to catch him before he does- not easy to do, and most people don't truly understand where a reaction starts. You get in there and correct WELL before the dog makes a peep, before a single hair on his back bristles... you correct the second the dog's brain quantifies that there's another dog in the area that he's going to react to. He's hardwired himself to react, to the point that he no longer knows of any other way to be around other dogs. You stop it before it happens, and you give yourself a very tiny (but very crucial) window of opportunity to get in there and start building other behaviors that are more appropriate. At that point, you are literally putting your foot in the door, just long enough to keep it from slamming shut, so that you can open it up again and walk through with whatever you're going to do to resolve the problem permanently. This isn't an easy thing to do- I don't honestly recommend you try doing it on your own, but its food for thought.

Either find yourself a top-flight behaviorist (not a "dog trainer", you're looking for a degree in animal behavior) to help, OR someone in the breed, who know's these dogs like they know themselves, and are accomplished enough to prove that and take the dog.

My opinions.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Buba, Feb 13 1:52 pm


Behavior & Training > Behavior Issues

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 8, '15 6:57am PST 
To be honest, this dog sounds extremely uncomfortable in the environment that he is currently in.

There has been a LOT of inconsistency in his life, a lot of poor training decisions. Malinois are not "elastic", they do not always snap back once damage has been done. This is one of the main reasons they are not generally a good choice for novice handlers... high drive and all that yes, but its their lack of forgiveness that makes them a difficult dog for the unsure trainer. Unlike a GSD, who will eventually recover from poor handling and still maintain a good training relationship, the Malinois is not so quick to fall back into things once they have lost confidence in their trainers and in life in general.

Agreed that you need a certified dog behaviorist IF you intend to keep the dog.

Though for all the nobility in trying to keep a loved family pet, I would honestly not consider it unreasonable to consider the option of re-homing. He is currently living in a very toxic environment... Provided his genetics aren't completely screwball (which, lets be realistic, is also a possibility), the sort of dog you chose might be better off in the hands of someone who understands them better.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Buba, Feb 13 1:52 pm

Behavior & Training > Sharky dog
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 8, '15 6:48am PST 
Well, if she's a Malinois... train her like a Malinois.

Ditch the treats, get a nice jute tug, start utilizing all that drive vs. being hindered by it. She's probably getting frustrated from the lack of perceived (in her mind) progress in the training as it is constantly being broken up with "uh-oh" moments (which are perfectly valid for most dogs... but for a dog who's pace is 90 miles and minute, the lack of progress can become frustrating).

First things first, build the game.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Cash, Feb 15 1:42 pm

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