Postings by Mulder

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Choosing the Right Dog > which dog should I get?
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 6, '15 8:22pm PST 
OP also made a tacky joke that they wanted a dog so impossibly perfect that it doesn't eat or crap.

It offers a bad rub. Honestly OP sounds like they want a no-input dog, which frankly doesn't exits in ANY breed. Not sure what they wanted to hear based on that.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Missy , Jun 7 12:42 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > Belgian Tervueren in large apartment
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue May 26, '15 6:23pm PST 
To be fair, Mals and Tervs are generally pretty different. Depends of course, there will be some overlap, but most Malinois are much higher drive, higher impact dogs.

Modern Tervs have largely been bred for show and companionship, I think you will find they have a much better in-home demeanor than most Malinois.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Mulder, May 26 6:23 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Belgian Tervueren in large apartment

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue May 26, '15 6:22am PST 
The average Terv is going to rank a lot like the "average" GSD in terms of apartment suitability- that is, they'll do fine so long as you give them the attention they need.

Your bigger problem with them will be to not let your work-at-home schedule lead to separation anxiety/barking issues. I'd put Tervs in the "more sensitive" category compared to most GSDs in this regard, and SA issues are something that can be a real pain in an apartment setting and should actively work on being avoided.

Other than that? If a Terv is otherwise the right dog for you (is it?), then you should be fine.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Mulder, May 26 6:23 pm


Food & Nutrition > Blue Buffalo

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Wed May 13, '15 8:28pm PST 
Who cares.

Nestle left contaminated chicken jerky products on shelves for YEARS to kill pets before ever even acknowledging there might be a problem. Its still on shelves in many countries where they refused to even pull it.

They're all garbage.

ETA:

The issue is, they dont do food trials. They dont have nutritionists on board. Their formulation is their own, but they dont even package it themselves. The food trials are all done on YOUR pet

Also, which is it, they don't do food trials or they do, just not under a laboratory setting? Inconsistent. Also, foolish to assume they don't work with nutritionists. Basically all commercial dog foods work with vets and or nutritionists to some capacity, call Blue yourself and ask for names, they WILL give them to you... I know because I have asked smile Only the people who have their heads so deep in the sands of "certain big kibble brands that wont be named here" believe that people are literally just throwing random formulas into bags without ever consulting with nutrition professionals.

FYI, the issue under litigation right now with Blue isn't about the nutritional adequacy of their products. Its about the quality and sourcing of their ingredients, and their packaging/marketing claims. Which makes this whole post that much more confusing.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ember FDX, May 25 2:22 pm


Raw Food Diet > New to feeding dogs raw

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 26, '15 7:41pm PST 
Wait, you did the entire meal as organs, and have never fed organ before? I'm not really understanding your post- 1 lb all organ meal, or you did 1 lb of 2.1 lbs (total) daily ration as organ?

Either way, yes, gut distress from way too much organ way too quickly. Generally speaking, you introduce one organ at a time, slowly over several days. You'll want to bust up that 1 lb of organ over the entire week, much smaller portions per meal. To further that, nearly 50% of the diet being organ is WAY too much. You need to shoot for about 10% total overall.

Also, even for wanting to gain weight, 2 lbs is a little high. For maintenance, a 70lb dog on average is only going to need about a lb and a half. You're doing 3% right now... generally speaking, I don't think you need to go that high unless the dog is extremely active/working and is not keeping wight, is still young, or is considerably underweight. If you're just trying to put a couple of extra lbs on him, feed the normal 2% for a while and adjust from there.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Ginger, Apr 27 9:35 am

Behavior & Training > Crate Training/House Training an Adult Dog
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 23, '15 3:04pm PST 
Here's some tips:

Don't just throw food in the crate and let him get it. That's fine to start out with, to make a simple positive association with the crate, but eventually you're going to have to up the ante. Start by leading him into the crate (you can use a food lure here starting out if he wont go in willingly), but withhold the treat until he is completely in. Meaning he has to walk into that crate and wait (momentarily) to be rewarded. Eventually you may want to start attaching a command to it. It can be something simple, like "crate" or "house" or whatever you want, so long as it isn't something you're already using daily for something else (so as not to confuse with words that already likely have a meaning to him). From here, you can work on duration... going into the crate on command, and then waiting in there for 5 seconds before rewards... them 10 seconds... 30 seconds... several minutes, ect. Your goal here is to gradually build up to him being in there without fuss, but its going to have to start with some impulse control exercises like this. Once you can get him in there sitting for a few minutes with no drama, then you can start introducing things like special "crate only" toys/treats/chews, things he can, once comfortable in the crate, chew on or play with only while in the crate (and to keep him occupied while you are away on long shifts).

Here's a pretty good little video for you to watch.

Don't worry about the bowl exercise at the end, but the rest of it is a pretty good demonstration of how this works.

12 hours a couple of times a week should be doable for an adult dog. Ideally, on the weeks where you'll be gone of those long shifts for more days, if the budget allows, consider hiring someone to come in just to let him for a potty break halfway through the day. I'm sure there are dog walkers or sitters who offer a basic service like this, just a potty break.

Scheduled feeds are good, keep up with that. Perhaps consider a slightly smaller meal in the morning, less on his stomach, and compensate for a larger one at night. Don't worry about him not having food throughout the day... he will survive wink

But a good long-lasting, safe chew is a a good idea. Look into deer antlers, a stuffed and frozen kong, water buffalo horns, etc for things to entertain him during the day.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Toby, Apr 24 9:19 am


Dog Health > Body Condition Scoring-- is he too thin?

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 20, '15 9:47pm PST 
LOL!

Says the person who appears to own several obese dogs, at least one of which is morbidly so!

But here I am making assumptions from pictures, I guess.

Mulder
Licensed holder of some friggin common sense
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Koby, Apr 28 4:27 am


Behavior & Training > Multiple behaviour problems. Time for a change!

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 20, '15 7:02am PST 
I'll say this... do whatever you're comfortable with first and foremost... but conditioning them to the crate isn't all that hard, even for an adult dog.

Leaving the crate out for them without being locked in is a good idea. Feeding all of their meals and offering all of their water from the crate is another, classical conditioning. You can offer "special" treats and toys only in the crate, things that will make them eager to be in there. Once they become conditioned to the crate, its easier to work on leaving them in their without a meltdown.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Toby, Apr 21 9:33 am


Behavior & Training > Multiple behaviour problems. Time for a change!

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 19, '15 4:36pm PST 
Any particular reason you're not interested in crate training?
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Toby, Apr 21 9:33 am

Food & Nutrition > Rotators!!
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 16, '15 12:21pm PST 
Scooter, every dog is different. Many brands are similar enough from formula to formula that you can straight switch from one to another... I know this is something Fromm has advertised specifically for their diets, as do plenty of others.

My general feeling on the matter, is, if the food's protein/fat% and caloric density isn't varying much from formula to formula, then its usually not a big deal to switch cold turkey. If you're going from a moderate food to much richer formula, or you just know your dog is sensitive, then of course transition.

I never transition when I do raw, just straight from one protein to the next. Rarely do with kibble, only if I know I'm going to something extra heavy. Did that not too long ago with a Fromm to EVO switch... big jump, so I gave it a couple of days to transition.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Trinity, May 14 6:40 pm

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