Postings by Jesse

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Service & Therapy Dogs > What do you say?
Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 23, '12 5:26am PST 
Jesse and I have been a therapy team about 3yrs or so. We visit a lot of different facilities all over my county and have traveled up state to do presentations and things like that. Now I know since Jesse is not an SD there is nothing a facility or person cannot ask me about him or myself. Generally I don't mind answering questions over and over, I am so used to it. However there is one that bothers me and I don't ever really know what to say.

I have a lot of visible scars on my body, especially my arms and legs that are self inflicted. Most people I come across don't know what they are and others do but ask anyways.

I wanted to know what do you as SD owners say to someone when asked what type of tasks your dog does or if they flat out ask what your disability is?
People don't state their question to me like this but similar and there are days where I am not in the mood to answer. I don't want to seem rude because I am after all at the facility to do something good. How can I answer in a polite way?

Any input is appreciated
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Oct 23 5:04 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Getting Validation From Family Members
Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 25, '12 8:11am PST 
I do not have an SD, how ever I can relate to some of the disorders and reasons for which you want an SD myself. To be honest when I was struggling a lot it was recommended for me to get a PSD and my family was 100% supportive. I cannot speak accurately to whether or not what you described counts under ADA as being legally able to have an SD, some of the other members here will be able to answer those questions for you better .

I'm not sure how close you are to your sister but perhaps if you explain to her the NEED for an SD and that it won't be like a pet. Working dogs have a job and they are there to make life a little easier for their handler and help them through the day with various tasks.

I have a friend who thinks that what I do with Jesse, my therapy dog is just "being able to take my pet to public places for fun". It isn't true and I've had to explain to her that what I do with him is not service work and it most certainly is not for the purpose of taking him everywhere with me.

I hope this helps =)

Wanted to add: It seems to me that what your are considering in a dog and how you will evaluate each one is the right to go. also the training plan you have so far seems accurate. Again I am speaking from training a TD and I also did not pick out the dog. It sort of just happened that he had the right personality for it.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Oct 12 11:33 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Unpolite SD?

Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 21, '12 4:41am PST 
At my work I come in contact with lots of people. A few times I have seen a young lady with an SD. She has never approached me for help or come my way until a few days ago. She asked for my help and so I got her what she needed. the dog was well behaved and seemed to be doing what she was supposed to. At one point I had to bend over and sort through some boxes. the dog proceeded to step closer to me and stick her nose up to my face. The dog is a doberman and I am not very tall so getting to my face was easy. The handler made no attempt to move the dog or say anything. I had some heavy boxes in my hand. Would it have been appropriate to ask her to move the dog so I could stand up? I had to slightly touch the dog and push so she would move enough for me to get up. I also said excuse me. the handler didn't seem to notice or she just didn't say anything. I don't know if the dog smelled my dog or what but after that, as we were walking around, she kept leaning and bumping on me. It didn't bother me except for it sort of made what I was doing a challenge. Heavy boxes plus a large leaning dog could be a problem. I haven't encountered many SDs in my area but when I do I respectfully address the person not the dog and do my best to stay out of the way. Never have one of the other dogs approached me. they always were focused on the handler. Is this normal behavior for an SD and what should I do in a situation like this?
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Rest in Paradise Voltaire. 1/1, Sep 21 6:42 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Commands for a Deaf TD

Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 9, '12 3:41pm PST 
I got some sad news a few days ago. My Jesse is losing his hearing. Vet thinks in a few yrs he will be completely deaf. I didn't get Jesse when he was a puppy and when I got him he was already command trained (basics). I taught him a few extras but they are all vocal. Since Jesse is a TD, I use those commands depending on what facility we are at. My question is how can I start to teach him to respond to hand cues? I've never trained a dog with hand signals it has always been verbal. I want to start now so that when he loses his hearing I will still be able to communicate with him. Also my biggest worry is his recall. He has an excellent recall. I call he comes no matter what. If he can't hear me what are some suggestions as to how to teach him to come to me?? any advice would be great.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Czarka, CGC UJJ, Sep 11 8:51 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Guide dogs in the classroom

Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 2, '12 5:09am PST 
Speaking from a therapy dog point of view, I attend events and conventions that last for hours and Jesse comes with me. If my organization has a meeting we go too. Generally, I make it a point to sit myself at the end of an aisle, close to the front, or close to the door so that if I feel that Jesse must go out I can take him. I'm not sure about service dogs but before I go anywhere with Jesse he is walked and I make sure he empties his bladder and take care of his business. There sometimes are other dogs around (not service dogs mostly TD) and Jesse has no problem sitting next to them. I give him a command to focus his attention away from the dogs and usually he will go to sleep under my chair. If I was placed away from the dogs or close to them well to me it doest matter because I know Jess will behave either way. Not sure if this helps. I'm sure a few guide dogs on here will be able to provide you with more information.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Chief Majestix the Impeccable , Oct 20 10:37 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Fake SD...This Made Me Angry
Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 20, '12 9:26am PST 
I should add in case someone asks....

I do not use Roo in any way. He is trained to follow commands his handler gives him and a 2nd person that is the caregiver of my friend. He will actually ignore anything I say to him unless my friend gives Roo permission to listen. I only hold his leash when we are in an area where dog and wheelchair next to each other don't fit (usually walking through small door ways or hallways or ramps) or if the handler asks me to, due to whatever is going on (most of the time when he is eating because he only has use of one hand). I don't want anyone to think Roo does anything for me.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 21 7:07 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Fake SD...This Made Me Angry

Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 20, '12 9:21am PST 
A co worker of mine and I got into a conversation about dogs. He asked me what I do with Jesse and explained it to him. I showed him a picture of Jesse with his vest on and my co worker asked me if I take him to grocery stores. I was a bit puzzled and said no why would I? Mind you this is after I spent 20 minutes explaining what a therapy dog is and what Jesse actually does. I clearly explained to him that Jesse is not an SD and by no means is he allowed into a grocery store. I further said that SDs are not pets and they serve a very specific purpose and people do not just slap a vest on their dog so they can go everywhere with them. He nodded his head and didn't say much, I'm not even sure if he was actually listening to me. At the end of my rant and I admit I was a bit frustrated because personally to me it is not hard to understand the difference between TD and SD...but maybe that is just me, my co worker said that I should just buy a new vest and label it with SD and then I could take him everywhere with me (I had told him earlier that I COULD take Jesse everywhere because he is very well behaved). I didn't even know what to say, I was so angry!

I have a friend with CP and he has a service dog. When they come to visit I take him out (movies, dinner, shopping etc.) and Roo, the SD, comes with us. People always say you can't have that dog in here or why do you need that dog. Roo will walk with me next to the wheelchair since his handler is not capable of holding onto the leash and sometimes in certain places the two of them next to each other just don't fit due to the type of wheelchair. anyways I'm getting off topic here...I just find it horrible that someone would suggest I fake my dog as an SD because I personally know how rude, inconsiderate people can be and how difficult it is when Roo is with us. the worst part of it all is my friend is very clearly disabled and it is obvious to anyone that walks by yet people still don't understand why he needs the dog. I told my co worker he shou;d never fake a pet as an SD because it gives people that need SDs more difficulties than they already have. thought I'd share because I have never had anyone tell me to do this. Most of the time people think Jesse is my SD and I always kindly explain the difference. I guess not everyone can understand.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 21 7:07 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > TD meets SD: What is appropriate?

Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 25, '12 4:07pm PST 
thanks for the input and here is what happened:

I did take into consideration the fact that some SD owners have had bad experiences with pet dogs, which I find irresponsible for those dog owners. I put Jesse in a down stay and asked the young lady if it would be OK for me to bring Jesse closer so I can keep an eye on him. I explained that he will not bother her dog at all and to let me know if at any time there is a problem with Jesse. She sort of glanced at Jesse and it looked to me like she was thinking. She said yes and Jesse was such a good boy. He went under my chair and stuck his nose in the air to smell the dog, was satisfied and went to sleep. I was so proud of him. In the end she said that she appreciates me keeping Jesse away from Julius (the dogs name) and that Jesse can say hello for minute if he wants to. I kindly told her Jesse is content meeting and greeting from where he is but thanks for offering. I thought that was nice of her. Overall, I think it went well and I hope to meet other SD teams and show them that not all dogs are intrusive and that their owners are irresponsible and inconsiderate wink
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Iris vom Zauberberg, Jun 25 4:19 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > TD meets SD: What is appropriate?

Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 21, '12 2:34pm PST 
I should add I don't think the handler is aware that Jesse will be with me. they told him/her I am a volunteer with a therapy dog but since I will not only be working with this person that day I have to bring Jesse along to work with the rest of the students.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Iris vom Zauberberg, Jun 25 4:19 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > TD meets SD: What is appropriate?
Jesse

Don\'t Give Up
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 21, '12 2:31pm PST 
I will be working with someone at a facility I visit with Jesse. This person has an SD. My question is, should I place Jesse in a down stay and approach theperson without him first so I can ask if the dog can come closer? Or is it OK for me to instruct Jesse to "ignore" (his command to not appraoch a dog) and go to the person that way? I was told the person is a teenager around 17 or 18 and he is participating in a new program. I was selected but am unsure of how to approach the situation. Jesse will not interfere with the dog whatsoever. He will lay quietly under my chair/table or at my side without trying to get to the SD. He does get a little excited and will wag his tail really fast when he sees another dog and will sit waiting for my permission to say hello. I won't let him do that of course unless I am told by the handler it is ok. Also would it be considered rude if I ask the handler if the dog is allowed to greet Jesse for a minute so Jesse can get aquainted? Once Jesse meets a dog he won't get excited anymore the next time and usually just ignores the dog. My concern is how to first introduce myself and Jesse without disturbing the SD. Any input is appreciated.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Iris vom Zauberberg, Jun 25 4:19 pm

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