Postings by Tilly

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Behavior & Training > Dominance in dogs?
Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 19, '12 2:41pm PST 
I do have problems reading a lot of text so have to copy and paste somewhere else. If you do a search for "What is dominance" you will get a lot of different ideas of the word, even those giving the dictionary definitions differ at times.

Unfortunately things become fashionable, when that happens they are inclinded to be used for everything, when the words "Dominant" and Dominance" started to be used they became fashionable but if you asked what they mean by those words not one person was able to tell me even though many kept using the words and put their interpretation on it when dealing with their dogs. Many dogs were being abused in the name of domanant/dominance so wording was changed.

Words like "Alpha", "Pack leader" etc was used instead but the same thing happened, they became fashionable words and again some dogs were abused because of the way the words were interpretated.

When a certain trainer came along on the TV things got worse with these fashionable words, owners, trainers and behaviourists started to hit back because of the abuse going on, what did this trainer do? He carried on doing what he was doing but put different words on it all. I did come across an article on this but at the bottom they recommended this trainer so I am not putting it up here, in fact I just deleted it. This is a better one http://www.wagandtrain.com/Portals/1/pdf/Tips-Tricks/August-2011-Dom inance.pdf

When we give information we must take into account that not everyone has experience with dogs, many are first time dog owners, these owners do not understand the technical wording so put their interpretation on it which leads to some very confused owners. Yes there is dominance in dogs, it is why some dogs are born black or white, etc. they have dominant genes just like we have. For dog behaviour wording like "Dominance" shouldn't be used because there are far too many ways to interpretate it, we cannot help dog owners properly if we don't say what we mean but leave owners to interpretate what we mean. I do try not to do that but as I am human I do slip up at times.

If an owner misinterpretates what we mean that is our fault for not explaining properly.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Tiller (Skansen's Ira in the M, Oct 21 1:45 pm

Senior Dogs > Forgetting House Training
Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 19, '12 7:14am PST 
Has your vet done tests on her to find out what is wrong? If he hasn't he can't say she is a healthy dog, if he has, you need a referal to a consultant.

It is so worrying when we have problems finding out what is wrong.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Tilly, Oct 19 7:14 am


Behavior & Training > Dominance in dogs?

Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 19, '12 5:35am PST 
I agree with Lupi,.these labels are dangerous especially labelling a dog as dominant. One of my dogs Bonnie was labelled as dominant by several people, in fact she is just a very confident, sweet girl. She takes everything in her stride no matter what happens but has never challenged me when she has understood what I have been asking of her. She is very easy to train and loves training and mind games.

The Chihuahua that Lupi describes sounds to me as being very spoilt and not got any ground rules to follow, like very spoilt children she is constantly challenging to find the ground rules. Dogs like her are not happy dogs but when ground rules are set up they are a lot happier, just like children.

I remember when I was in my teens there was a problem with dogs forming packs during the day, their owners worked full time and the dogs would be put out of the house when they went to work. Most of these dogs would be waiting by their houses when their owners came home. What their owners didn’t know was these dogs had gathered together during the day and were terrifying the area, people were frightened to go out in case they were attacked, there were quite a lot of attacks by these dogs. As Jackson Tan says these dogs were not missed if they didn’t turn up. Some days there would be several small packs, others one or two big packs. Their owners were shocked when they found out what their very loving, well behaved pets were getting up to.

The incident with your dog and the Chi I wouldn't put it into the Dominance theory, without seeing it happen I couldn't say what it is but I have seem similar things, to me they were just dogs being nice to another dog. This is why labelling dogs is so dangerous, there are people who would say that was dominance but couldn't say why.

Everyone has a different idea of what dominance means and that is causing most of the problems.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Tiller (Skansen's Ira in the M, Oct 21 1:45 pm


Behavior & Training > My poodle is picking fights with my other dogs and cats. A new behavior.

Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 10:25am PST 
What your vet is telling you doesn't make sense, it is more likely they forgot to send the xrays and are just fobbing you off. 2 weeks to get xrays back is worse than our National Health Service.laugh out loud

Yes, pain could cause this behaviour.

This could also be related to you loosing your other dog or it could be a mixture of both the loss and pain.

You need to kick butt with your vet, you are paying for a service you are not getting.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Tilly, Oct 18 10:25 am


Behavior & Training > Dominance in dogs?

Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 18, '12 10:17am PST 
Sorry, I don't have the time to read all the posts.

I met Barry at a friend's wedding, he is a lovely man, quiet and gentle, I met his wife as well. He has so much knowledge and to me his view on dominance made sense then, now with a lot more experience it makes even more sense.

I have 5 dogs, I don't have a pack, I just have 5 dogs that get on together. A pack of dogs is mum, dad and offspring, the older pups help bring up the younger ones, when they are reaching maturity they are kicked out of the pack to fend for themselves. Apart from us kicking out our teenagers a pack of dogs is the same as a family of humans but dogs do a better job than us humans do. laugh out loud
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by Tiller (Skansen's Ira in the M, Oct 21 1:45 pm

Behavior & Training > Training a Hand-Shy Dog
Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 10, '12 10:27am PST 
Of course dogs need to learn that getting hold of their collar isn't an aggressive act but with dogs like this they have to learn to trust you first, they have reason not to trust us so we have to get through that.

As to patting them on the head, have a look at this clip http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n2cC6LBD_Ug&feature=related
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Rocky *CGC* With the angels., Oct 15 8:44 am


Behavior & Training > How do you feel about invisible fences?

Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 10, '12 8:00am PST 
Sorry I don't agree with you, mainly because you haven't taken into account the sudden impulse a dog can take which is out of caracter and unexpected. No matter how well trained a dog is there is always the chance that they will always see something the other side which they will lunge through for. It doesn't matter how good an owner you are, how well you check and maintain the fencing, how well you know your dog, it can always happen.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Cider Doughnut Shenanigans, Oct 12 4:38 pm


Behavior & Training > Deaf Great Dane

Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 10, '12 7:55am PST 
My foster boy Jethro has sight problems, he can only see downwards which does cause problems at times. Like your dog his problems are worse when it is dark.

I do know someone who has several dogs that are both deaf and blind, she used touches to communicate with her dogs. Depending on what she wants the dog to do is were she touches the dogs. Jethro is trained to the voice because of his sight problems but all my other dogs are trained to both hand signals and voice.

You also need something to let her know that she has done well, those small torches are idea but they must have a blue light, a white one can cause problems as they can dazzle your dog.

You do need extra control when out for your’s and her safety, it is impossible to train a dog to walk on a loose lead if they are constantly pulling, when pulling they are reinforcing the pulling behaviour and learning to have pressure on the lead. It doesn’t matter if you eventually want to walk her on a collar or harness, she still has to be taught. I would walk her on a harness and either a flat collar or head collar with 2 leads, have them different widths so it is easy to tell which is which without looking at them. Have the thicker on were you eventually want to have the lead and the thinner one as back up. As soon as she starts to pull bring the other lead into action so you are using both leads to hold her with, this really does help, even having 2 leads clipped to the same place will give you more hold.

Having had a dog that had to have a tracheotomy put in which was probably caused by pressure on her neck when younger, could have been a choke chair or flat collar, I never walk my dogs on a collar now, they are all walked on a harness even though they all walk on a loose lead but it is personal preference, I do think that dogs should not be taught to walk on a loose lead with the lead clipped to the collar. It isn’t just Ellie I think this, I have seen several dogs seriously injure their necks when they tried to take off with the lead clipped to the collar, once the dog is reliable with walking then you can walk with the lead clipped to the collar.

Those that taught their dogs to walk on a loose lead with a collar, how do you know that your dog hasn’t had their neck damaged at some time, it only shows up when it is really bad. Too many dogs have neck problems these days, the method of pulling the dog back when they start to pull is responsible for most of them. Just because it hasn’t happened doesn’t mean it won’t. Ellie went through hell with her neck, I wouldn’t like to see another go through what she did.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Sabi, Oct 10 9:57 pm


Behavior & Training > Training a Hand-Shy Dog

Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Wed Oct 10, '12 7:35am PST 
Well done for taking Felix on, he will teach you a lot about dogs which you will pass on to other dogs in the future. I have had several dogs like this, the worst was Merlin my ex racing Greyhound, even after 6 years he would scream if someone moved their hand fast over his head.

You have to go at his pace not the pace you would like to go, he has to learn that you are not going to do things to him that have been done in the past and that takes time.

Try not to put your hands over his head, not even reaching over him, he is quite new to you and still learning about you. Also DO NOT GET HOLD OF HIS COLLAR, especially from the back of his neck, to a dog th t is an aggressive act and many will bite especially if they have problems. I always put a house lead on any dog I take in until I know them better and they know me. This means I have control of the dog but don’t have to get hold of his collar, I just pick the end of the lead up and encourage him to follow me as I lead him to were I want him to go. Much kinder to the dog and safer for me. I do take the handle off the lead and take it off when I go out for safety. To put the lead on only clip it on from under the dog’s neck not from above and if necessary get down to his level to do it.

For taking treats start with high resource treats like bits of cheese, as you walk past drop a couple on the ground and let him pick them up, gradually he will look forward to them so then you can show them to him before dropping onto the floor. You will find that eventually he will start to move to your hand for the treats. Once he takes the cheese from you hand you can start to offer other treats.

If you see him bumping into the crate or anything else and when he bumps into you, smile at him and tell him he is a silly boy in a happy voice. It is very important with a dog like this that you smile a lot with them, this softens your body language. You can test this by frowning, look at how your body is then immediately smile and see how different you body is, more relaxed.

Don’t force him to walk, if you have another dog will he work with him/her? Just let him stand and stare when he goes out, take to him in a happy voice so he doesn’t think anything is wrong, gradually he will gain confidence and start to walk with you. You can encourage him to walk as well.

This sort of behaviour has nothing to do with his breed, he has been abused on some way or other,

Don’t be too quick to do serious training at the moment, that doesn’t mean you can’t do any, if you want him to learn to sit or down on command, instead of luring him when he sits or lies down on his own put the command onto it and reward him, he will work out what the commands mean but it will take longer than luring.

Of course he will come round with time and patience, it is early days and he has been through a lot, it may take a year or 2 to get him to the way he should be but well worth the effort. It took my Greyhound 2 years before he got onto the sofa were he grew roots, once on he stayed on.

English Setters have been bred to obey us so he will learn quite quickly once he starts to gain confidence, that is what you really need now. Just accept what he offers and don’t push him to do more, he will learn a lot quicker if you do, he will also gain more confidence as he learns that he gets rewarded but not punished.

How old is Felix supposed to be? Big dogs don’t stop growing until a lot later than small dogs, some dogs can take as long as 3 years to grow to full size but I think English Setters can grow until the are 18 to 24 months old. Beagles are often big chested which could account for the harness fitting Felix as English Setters can be more like a Lurcher in the chest.

Just because Felix looks like an English Setter doesn’t mean he is, he may have another breed there, Dolly looks like a Cocker but is a Cocker/JRT, the person who bred her must have been crazy.naughty
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Rocky *CGC* With the angels., Oct 15 8:44 am

Behavior & Training > I like swinging my butt out- improper heeling
Tilly

916869
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 7, '12 3:22am PST 
Sorry I didn't realise that this was a pup, it is very dangerous to pups to expect them to do to much too quickly, by insisting she sits next to you is aksing far too much for a 6 month old. She is still growing both internally and externally, at her age she is just going into her teenage hooligan stage as well as her second fear period, how you handle her in the next 6 to 12 months will affect her for the rest of her life.

We all want well trained dogs but we should enjoy having our dogs as well as our dogs enjoy their lives, if we ask to much of them it is a very poor life for our dogs.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Bosley , Oct 7 10:26 am

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