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Border Collie > Wavy Coated Border Collies
Irena Ted

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Barked: Fri Mar 6, '09 6:01am PST 
There's three coat types that you might see in a Border Collie.

Smooth, which doesn't mean the hair lays flat, but rather that it's slick like a lab. No feathering on the ears is a good clue, and also look at the back of the front legs. This type of coat is dominant, which means if the dog has one (of two) genes for the coat, he or she will be smooth.

Rough. Almost any other type of coat. The hair may be anything from just a very tiny bit of feathering, up to the dripping coat of the conformation type dogs. This coat is recessive, which means the dog has to have TWO genes for this coat, for it to "express." But that also means that if both parents are rough coated, they will not be smooth coated (because there won't be any smooth genes to pass on).

Bearded. Yes, the Border Collie has bearded genetics in it still (Rough, Smooth, Bearded, and Border Collies were all the same breed only 125 years ago). There's only a couple of pockets of beardie-type lines left, and they are mostly overseas.

I have a good friend with a dog that goes back to one of these lines and he looks almost like a pure Beardie - except there is NO Beardie in the immediate pedigree. I have a picture of this dog working sheep if anyone's interested. He is fully registered in the ABCA. He was AKC registered too but they threw him out - based entirely on his looks. >frown

I have another friend who has a dog whose grandmother is noted to be a "bearded coat" even though her lines are registered Border Collies. My friend's dog herself is actually a smooth coat, but very wavy. Both smooth and rough coated dogs can have wavy coats, which can vary from just a little wave, up to a tight curl like it's been permed.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Jan 30 4:29 pm

Food & Nutrition > ol roy
Irena Ted

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Barked: Thu Dec 11, '08 11:24am PST 
Wow, I haven't looked at a bag of Ol' Roy in years. It's actually WORSE than the feed store feeds that usually read, "Ground corn, meat and bone meal, soybean meal, poultry fat.", etc.

The majority of the ingredients in a dog food are the ones the precede the fat source (if there is one). This food gets most of it's protein from SOYBEANS. Yuck. Good for humans, bad for dogs.

Yes, the GI, the small intestine in particular would be assaulted by this food. When you feed stuff this bad for a long time, it starts making little holes in the surface of the small intestines. It becomes harder for the GI to recognize what is "on board" and make the correct enzymes. Undigested food irritates the gi even further and activates the immune system. There's a whole chain effect that can happen. Badness. Very bad badness.

Just. Holy Cow. I'm now just speechless at how awful that is and at the thought that it is the NUMBER ONE selling dog food in the country. It would be better to let your dog run loose and hunt for his food! Poor, poor dogs. shock
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» There has since been 33 posts. Last posting by , Dec 14 1:29 am


Raw Food Diet > for those of you with allergies - a ?

Irena Ted

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Barked: Mon Dec 8, '08 8:19am PST 
It's true that you can improve allergies holistically. But the process of allerigic response is a medical fact and pretty well understood. I have a friend who is head of immunology research at NIH and it's partly due to her work that we do understand what happens during allergic response.

One of her areas of research is the relationship between the gi and total immune health. To sum up one of the main points we would often discuss, minimizing the gi to triggers significantly reduces the body's "alert" status.

She herself feeds prey model raw to her working BCs, by the way.

I'm gonna guess you haven't found all your dog's triggers yet. Or the environmental allergies are just too severe to take your dog off "red alert" status. Also, if your dog is over four, have the thyroid tested.

Have I explained about the "Bucket" yet? Sometimes I forget where I've written what. party
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Dec 8 9:13 pm


Raw Food Diet > nutritional value of blood from raw meats

Irena Ted

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Barked: Sun Dec 7, '08 5:54am PST 
If you purchase meat from a human-meat butcher, they'll have "bled" the carcass, which means they open the jugular (usually by removing the head) and then hanging the meat for an hour to a day or so (as in the US). Otherwise it's an awful mess and you can't see what you are trying to do as you cut into the meat (been there, done that party ).

Pretty much all the blood in the meat will then leave the carcass, particularly whole blood products which are heavier.

If it coagulates, it's whole blood or at least mostly whole. If it doesn't, its nutritional value is rather low as the part that coagulates is the part with the nutrition. Whole blood is already mostly water.

I can get blood at the Hispanic market but for me it's really not worth the money or having to figure it in (not to mention store it, blech).
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Dec 7 3:02 pm


Raw Food Diet > nutritional value of blood from raw meats

Irena Ted

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Barked: Sat Dec 6, '08 7:54am PST 
The red stuff in a package of meat is not blood. It is pretty much only water, stained with the substance that makes "red" meat red. Whole blood coagulates quickly and would be anything from the consistency of jello up to a cheesecake.

Anyone hungry now? laugh out loud

Just count it like water.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Dec 7 3:02 pm

Home Prepared Food & Recipes > Raw sweet potatoes safe for dogs?
Irena Ted

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Barked: Sat Dec 6, '08 6:53am PST 
Favorite. Dog. Funny. EVER: http://littera-abactor.livejournal.com/7748.html Titled, "I has a Sweet Potato" I could read it a million times over.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by , Jan 1 8:59 pm


Raw Food Diet > RBM'S?

Irena Ted

Got Sheep?
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 5, '08 2:53pm PST 
When you feed raw, bones are an important part of the diet because the bones provide most of the calcium in the diet. Raw meaty bones are fully edible - the dogs can crunch them up and swallow and the bone is digested. These bones are usually called "RMBs"

Recreational bones are not edible - not the bone part - and don't count as part of the diet. The short name for these is "rec bones."
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 10:38 pm


Raw Food Diet > Taking care of someone else's dog?

Irena Ted

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Barked: Fri Dec 5, '08 12:46pm PST 
I do in house training. I feed kibble to those dogs. But if it's okay with the owner, I top their kibble with stew when the other dogs get it.

Rescues get a standardized home cooked recipe. I tell new owners what I do, bt I don't have any requirement that they continue with it.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 10:38 pm


Home Prepared Food & Recipes > Will this work? Yogurt coating recipe for cookies.

Irena Ted

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Barked: Fri Dec 5, '08 12:40pm PST 
The icing sugar ("powdered" sugar) has corn starch in it that will help the frosting harden. That recipe won't work without the powdered sugar.

The second one uses crystalized corn syrup to make a "Candy" coating. Honey won't work because it's got too much water in it.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 12:40 pm

Raw Food Diet > A Weird Problem
Irena Ted

Got Sheep?
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 5, '08 10:40am PST 
A prebiotic is a nutrient that encourages the natural growth of probiotic activity in the gut. It is a slower way to go but also has more long term effects - and you can feed it indefinitely and as much as you want without upsetting tummies or making the gut dependent on it.

Probiotics are the friendly organisms that live in the colon and help process food. One of their most important function is processing minerals. Without them, free minerals can cause stomach upset. That's why switching from chicken (low mineral content) to beef (very high mineral content) can cause the runs without allowing the body time to build up the environment in the gut needed to process those extra minerals.

Pork is in the middle of chicken and beef in terms of mineral content. It's not any more difficult to digest than any other meat - it just depends on the dog. Generally, it's well tolerated. As with the beef you still want to transition slowly.

When you start raw, any time you make a change you'll want to figure out how to introduce it in a way that your dog will tolerate. Some dogs do fine with every new thing thrown at them, no problem. Others need more care.

good luck!
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Dec 6 8:05 am

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