Postings by ♠ Ruger ♠

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Behavior & Training > Anyone have any suggestions?
♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 27, '09 11:20am PST 
Closing the curtains doesn't help, it actually makes him scratch more...

He doesn't damage anything, like I said it's just annoying. I put my daughter's sand box under the window, with the lid on it's tall enough he can sit on it and look in, but he still scratches.

Maybe I should get one of those outdoor rubbermaid bins... he'll probably get up on it but maybe it'll put him at a level where he can't scratch...
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 27 11:20 am

Behavior & Training > Anyone have any suggestions?
♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 27, '09 9:33am PST 
We have a single story home and Ruger likes to jump up and look in our bedroom window. He only does it in the morning, never when my husband gets up to go to work, but only about the time I get up. He will quietly jump up and peek in, and if I'm not moving, he'll go about his business.

However, if I"m awake and just laying in bed, he'll scratch at the window/screen and it makes a kinda horrible noise. He hasn't done any damage, but underneath our window the stucco (oh I do so hate stucco) is filthy. He'll also scratch at the stucco.

If my daughter is awake, I'll yell at him to get down (unless the window is open, in which case I just firmly tell him to get down) Problem is if she's asleep I have to get up, walk out to the sliding glass door, and open it, and by then he's laying in his dog house because he knows he's going to be in trouble.

I know that to either correct or reward a behavior, it's a matter of doing so just a second or two from when the behavior is carried out... he's a very agile dog and will climb/get over or on anything I put in front of the window.

How would you go about correcting a behavior like that? Like I said, he's not destroying anything, and he only does it when he knows I"m awake, it's just kinda annoying...
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 27 11:20 am


Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.

♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 26, '09 9:13am PST 
Ruger is actually really responsive to my husband... he walks perfectly on leash for him... on halloween he had several people asking if Ruger was a service dog or something because he'd walk perfectly in heel and then lay at my husband's feet... it's not a training/listening issue, it's a hyperness issue. We're gonna give it some time, we're practicing some calming exercises. My husband believes in one person dogs, and for that purpose stood away when I trained Ruger.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am


Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.

♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 25, '09 11:58am PST 
Thanks once more for the responses and support... I do not and have never crated a dog, and as far as company coming over when they get to the door I make Ruger sit and wait, which he does despite the shaking and tail wagging, and when they are OK with him I let him go say hi... he's pretty good about not jumping on people, but after a few minutes of meet and greet he goes outside. We'll try the click to calm method...

I'm glad Ruger isn't a compulsive fetch player... I promised my husband I wouldn't have another ball playing dog...

Thanks again so much everyone!
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am


Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.

♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 25, '09 7:20am PST 
Loki, I want to squish your jowls... I had a saint growing up and use to do that to him all the time.

I tried rewarding his calm behavior, but that makes him hyper... I think we're gonna try time and ignoring him... see if it helps.

Also a herding class is a good idea, thanks! We'll see if there's one around in the spring.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am

Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.
♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 25, '09 7:04am PST 
Asher, we do agility... we don't compete yet, and only do a small course but now that he's a year we'll pick up the pace.

Donovan, we have not been to a vet in a little while, but last time we went, a few months ago, he had a clean bill of health.

I'm not giving up on Ruger, and my husband does respect his intelligence and appreciate him for that, he just gets frustrated at his uncontrollable energy. I do love Ruger and my husband very much, and I'm not ready to give up on Ruger... I'm betting that when he gets a bit older he'll settle some.

My husband butted heads with Cheyenne when she was younger, and she ended up being his dog by her choice.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am


Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.

♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 25, '09 6:51am PST 
Thanks again for the replies...

We never go for "freebie" walks... Ruger is always randomly practicing heel, stops and sits... he's never allowed to just go for a walk. Even on his excessive off leash runs I often recall him, have him sit and wait, and then release him back to running.

Also, my husband and I are very calm people, and so is our daughter. We do not believe in talking to animals in cutsey, high pitched voices. In fact, it's one of his biggest pet peeves.

Ruger does know his place... he knows that he comes after my husband and daughter and he isn't and never has tried to compete with either of them for my affections.

As far as the mental stimulation goes... should I increase it to three training sessions a day? Should I increase the amount of time I spend on each session? Should I try and teach more in a session?


ETA: BOL I don't expect him or any dog to be a perfect angel. I know he's young and Payson makes puppy number five I've raised, three have been herding dogs, one malamute, and a st. bernard... I always expect a high energy level with pups, especially herding dogs, but in both mine and my husband's experiences most calm down, or at least learn to control their energy, by the time they're a year or two...
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am


Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.

♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 25, '09 6:09am PST 
Thanks Cracker, I'll google the protocol for relaxation...

I practice NILIF with all my dogs, I always have but up until recently never knew what it was called.

I never thought of overstimulation... maybe I'll try cutting back on the exercising a bit and see if it helps.

I've tried clicker training calmness and where he's been real responsive to clicker training for tricks (I only just recently started with a clicker, all his basic training was doen without one)...

I try to get people to ignore him... it's hard when everyone wants to pet Payson (even though she could care less if anyone but me and my daughter pets her) and he barges his furry butt in and people feel bad... I've actually debated a few times on leaving him at home from time to time and just taking Payson... but I don't know if that would have any unseen adverse effects...
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am


Behavior & Training > At wits end... need to vent.

♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 25, '09 5:49am PST 
I think I just need to vent...

I'd like to start by saying I wholeheartedly believe dogs are lifetime commitments, and unless you have an extreme case or circumstance you should troubleshoot any problems that arise, be them training, behavior, health, etc.

Having said that, I'm kind of at wits end with Ruger. He and my husband do not get along. And my husband was here first. The problem stems from Ruger's uncontrollable hyperness, his extreme energy level, and his compulsive licking.

Now, average day for us includes at least one long walk around the neighborhood, lots of backyard play time, play time with Payson, three to five times a week we hike over to a lake and he swims for long periods of time, and gets tons of off-leash run time, we usually get to the dog park two to three times a week, and practice agility. I'm home all the time, he goes almost everywhere with me, on the weekends he goes over to a family member's house who has property and a puppy for him and Payson to play with. He does not lack on exercise. I also spend at least one twenty minute training session a day teaching tricks and such, and as soon as he starts to get one down I start teaching a new one, while practicing all the old tricks. So I wouldn't think he's lacking on mental stimulation either.

He is only a year old.

He listens very well, will recall no matter where he is, even if he can't see you. He's got the basics down to where he can be yards away from you and you can tell him to sit or lay down and he'll immediately do it.

Now, my husband grew up on a working cattle ranch. He's always had queensland heelers. He knows and understands the mentality of a herding dog, and while most of his heelers were working cow dogs, he did have one that was a pet, and was a tennis ball spazz, but still wasn't nearly as psychotic as Ruger.

The issue comes, as I said, from Ruger's seemingly uncontrollable energy. He can't turn it off. The minute you try to pet him, or talk to him, or give him a treat, he completely spazzes. If you do try to pet him, he licks compulsively. If there are three people petting him, and someone reaches over and pats Payson, Ruger immediately pushes himself in the way, knocking everyone over including Payson, to get to the one person who patted her. If he is being calm around people, and you try to calmly reward him in any way, he turns into a complete freak again. If you even talk to him he spazzes. He's constantly knocking down people, not from jumping or anything, but just from being so hyper and running/spinning into them. We get after him and he'll calm for thirty seconds, then forget it.

For example, last weekend we were over at the cousin's house and he played all day. When we got home, my husband got out of the bronco and told the dogs to come on. Payson doesn't usually listen to him, so he called Ruger. Instead of Ruger getting out of the truck, he shoved his way from the back seat to underneath my feet in the driver's seat. My husband has never hit, or even really gotten after Ruger. He was calling him in a calm, kind voice. Payson started to get out, then saw Ruger spazzing under my feet, and she cowered into the back. My husband just shrugged and walked away.

One of the reasons I fell in love with my husband was because he was the first and only person I'd ever seen Brandywine and Nannook take to instantly. They loved him, and followed him around everywhere. He's so good with dogs, horses, even cats... all animals really. But Ruger for some odd reason is extra freaky around him.

This problem has gotten worse over the last three or four months. I've tried everything I can think of, everything I've ever seen Dogsters suggest, everything I've looked up on the net... it seems the more you try to calm him down, the more he spazzes.

I've had him since he was just under five weeks old. His mom was hit and killed by a car and he was bottle fed. Cheyenne was his surrogate mother, and kept him in check, but as soon as she died when he was six months old, and that's when I really started working with him (I did before, but after she died I stepped it up several notches just to give him a distraction).

Anyway, there's a lot of tension between him and my husband, to where when my husband gets home Ruger goes outside. I think it annoys other people as well when they try to pet him and he spazzes out and licks compulsively. Even my daughter, who loves animals, gets mad at Ruger all the time when he does things like sniffs her face or licks her. Payson can do anything, but Ruger she gets mad at.

My husband has flat out told me (we have a very open and honest relationship) that Ruger bugs him, and that he just plain does not like him. I've come out and asked him if he wants me to get rid of Ruger... he always tells me that he doesn't care, that Ruger isn't his dog, he's my dog, he was bought for me, and what I do with him is entirely up to me...

Sorry it was so long, I just really needed to vent... am I just not offering Ruger enough? Does he need to be in a home with livestock? Will he calm down with age? I know he's still young, but this also doesn't seem like a puppy thing to me... or my husband.
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by ♠ Ruger ♠, Feb 26 9:13 am

Dog Health > What vaccinations do you recommend?
♠- Ruger- ♠

Live to- Swim!!
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 15, '09 7:48pm PST 
I personally feel outside of the puppy vaccines (distemper and parvo, etc.) and rabies, there is no need to vaccinate a dog. There are many who will argue with me on this, but I feel it's unnecessary. Unless there is some epidemic or major illness in the area you're in, the fewer vaccines the better.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Henry CGC, Feb 16 10:10 am

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