Postings by Aina Aloysius de LeMaitre

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Choosing the Right Dog > Tell me about the Leonberger
Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 11, '14 9:07am PST 
Leonbergers are absolutely amazing dogs but they are definitely not for everyone.

Do they shed? All the time. Grooming requirements? Continual. They do not have that distinct double coat like a Newfie. Most love water and require thorough drying after their frequent (and often unplanned) swims.

How are they with strangers? Depends on how well the owners socialize them. But characteristically, they can range from being highly social and outgoing to polite and aloof.

Guardian qualities? Depends on the line and the socialization. Most are not frequent barkers. One of the first leonberger specialties I attended was incredibly devoid of barking despite having so many large dogs together in one space.

Training? They are versatile, highly intelligent, independent thinkers. Remember that they have Pyrenean Mastiff and Great Pyrenees in their background. Meaning that their "nearby" may be further than most are accustom to. And their willingness, interest, and drive to "work" or respond immediately for your command may not be razor sharp. This attribute is very dependent on the dog's line.

Prey drive? Also lineage dependent. Sheep (and child) Herding is an ability that many are skillful at. Others could not care less and have zero prey drive.

To learn more, join the online Leo community (leolist) or attend a leonberger specialty.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Scruffy (RIP), Mar 12 10:15 am

Dog Health > The Incontinence Sage Continues
Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 30, '13 1:07pm PST 
Is the incontinence associated with the spay? Or could there be a kidney or bladder issue (not UTI)?

Has an ultrasound been done to confirm the actual cause? Without that definitive answer, you could be spending a great deal of time, effort, and money masking symptoms of a greater issue.

If the kidney or bladder (or both) need support, there are plenty of nutraceuticals and herbs available. They can be quite effective in healing, not only addressing the challenging symptom.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Libby, Jul 31 3:31 pm


Behavior & Training > Anxiety with thunder and fireworks.....

Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 9, '13 7:09pm PST 
You have lots of options:
acupuncture to stabilize your constitution to handle stressful,situations as your breed is known for

Homeopathic remedies like aconite a 30C, single dose at sudden onset (there are combo remedies out there that might be another option)

Herbal tinctures (animals apawthecary tranquility blend is an easy one to start with)

Flower essences like rescue remedy or Mimulus or Rock Rose

Sound therapy with music specifically engineered to calm dogs ("Through a dog's ear" is one CD). It calms two leggers as well. Bonus!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Opheila, Jun 9 8:48 pm


Raw Food Diet > Raw for cats

Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 9, '13 11:25am PST 
You will have to check out Catster or speak to a vet who can counsel you regarding nutritional therapy beyond the kibble they sell in their front office. Cats' dietary needs are different than dogs. Basically, they are significantly more carnivore than omnivore. And then it gets more specific beyond there. Even transitioning cats from one food to another can be a completely different challenge than it is with a dog. We successfully transitioned four different cats from crappy kibble to homemade raw. Each had its own health condition to be addressed nutritionally. All were far more healthy on their specific raw diets than with anything else.

As for a heart condition being addressed nutritionally, that approach can be powerful. I was diagnosed with early stage dilated cardiomyopathy and was treated using an allopathic approach as well as complimentary medicine. A big part of the treatment was nutritional therapy. Prior to this diagnosis, I got raw meat organs with my cooked meals but no particular focus on which organs. After the DCM diagnosis, my main raw organ meat was heart. Needless to say, all organs were from the highest quality sources available (grass fed, local, organic, etc). From a TCM perspective, one eats where one is lacking. So if my weak organ is heart, that is what I need to eat more of. If we look at the nutrients in heart meat, we see that components supportive for the heart (like taurine) are in high concentration. My heart condition actually improved over a year's time, based on repeated diagnostics. I don't know the cause of your heart condition or its treatment but nutritional therapy could be a powerful tool for you. It was for me!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Aina Aloysius de LeMaitre, Jun 9 11:25 am


Raw Food Diet > Raw food vs home cooked food?

Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 9, '13 11:14am PST 
From my experience, no one feeding approach is absolutely appropriate for every dog. I started out on low quality kibble with a high quality supplement since that was what the breeder was using. Sounds odd but a balance was struck between time and money with the results being dogs that thrive. My person transitioned me to raw and I did poorly. The few conventional vets we saw all counseled against raw and figured that I probably had megaesophagus (based only on clinical symptoms, no diagnostics). Then I got to see a couple different vets who practice complimentary medicine, including nutritional counseling. These particular vets each felt the raw was too rich for my system at the time. I switched to cooked and was fine from there on out. Not an uncommon situation from their experience.

As for heart conditions and nutritional therapy, I have some experience there. I was diagnosed with early stage dilated cardiomyopathy and was treated using an allopathic approach as well as complimentary medicine. A big part of the treatment was nutritional therapy. Prior to this diagnosis, I got raw meat organs with my cooked meals but no particular focus on which organs. After the DCM diagnosis, my main raw organ meat was heart. Needless to say, all organs were from the highest quality sources available (grass fed, local, organic, etc). From a TCM perspective, one eats where one is lacking. So if my weak organ is heart, that is what I need to eat more of. If we look at the nutrients in heart meat, we see that components supportive for the heart (like taurine) are in high concentration. My heart condition actually improved over a year's time, based on repeated diagnostics. I don't know the cause of your heart condition or its treatment but nutritional therapy could be a powerful tool for you. It was for me!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Aina Aloysius de LeMaitre, Jun 9 11:14 am

Dog Health > Need Help FAST - Toxins In Dogs Blood Work
Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 30, '13 7:00am PST 
You do have options. You are smart to find another vet. I would recommend finding a vet who routinely uses Traditional Chinese Herbs, Western herbs, and/or homeopathy since all of those healing modalities have powerful approaches to help a body deal with toxins. Without necessarily knowing the exact toxin. This is why they are used as complimentary medicine with radiation therapy, chemotherapy, etc. You can find a find a vet in your area through the ahvma's website: ahvma.org If there is not one in your area, some of the listed vets will work with you long distance or help find you a nearby vet they work with.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Tsuki, May 1 11:51 am


Behavior & Training > For the Fear of Dogs...? How do you handle people afraid of your dog?

Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 26, '13 9:51am PST 
How does a two legger handle other people's fears? Take the cue from the four legger, who rises above the negative and is the absolute role model of calm, composure, and self- assuredness.

When people see me coming, they scurry their toddlers away, the young lift their small children, the aged and uninformed lift their barking small dogs, teenage girls cultivate their neediness by squealing, most people cross the street. The most important thing for my person is to be steady and compassionate rather than chuckle. We break down barriers and stereotypes with each positive interaction. If we can leave an interaction with others being happier or more at peace, then we have fulfilled our purpose for today.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Missy , Apr 26 11:43 am


Dog Health > Heart Condition - Early Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCH)

Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 5:05am PST 
There are LOTS of things you can do for your Jack Russell at this time to help support the heart and slow the progress of DCM. Nutritional support is a big one, then there are nutritional supplements, vitamins, herbal supplements (both Western and Chinese), medicinal mushrooms, acupuncture, and the list goes on.

I was diagnosed with early DCM but with treatment got better. Really. After my first echo and subsequent diagnosis, I went in routinely for echos as directed by the Tufts' cardiologist. With the help of my holistic vet's care, I got all kinds of treatment. When I went back to the cardiologist for my follow up echos, he found a definite healing each time. Not something he would usually see, so I would say that the treatments definitely worked for my case. The cardiologist is not the one who prescribed the treatment though. It was our regular vet, who practices conventional and complimentary medicine, that came up with the treatment protocol.

We listen to the weekly radio talk show "Pets, People, & Paradise" by Dr. Ihor Basko. He had some episodes about heart conditions, so you might want to check out his website, blog, podcasts available via his blog, and even a consult with him. We have no affiliation with him or his practice other than feeling that Dr. B rocks! If we lived on Kauai where he is, he would be our regular vet for sure!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Aina Aloysius de LeMaitre, Apr 16 5:05 am


Food & Nutrition > Leonberger food question

Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 2, '13 8:53am PST 
I would recommend that you find our way to the Leolist, which is a wealth of Leo support and guidance. The web address to learn more: http://www.leonberger.com/LeoWorld/leolist.html
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Tessie, Apr 2 12:12 pm

Raw Food Diet > Chicken Feet (yum lol)
Aina- Aloysius de- LeMaitre

work hard, play- hard
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 7, '13 7:36am PST 
Chicken feet are the greatest! They are too small for me though---I just gulp them down. My kitties always got to eat the chicken feet though because they would excitedly crunch up every piece of bone, then gulp them down. Even as kittens they knew what chicken feet were all about. When I heard them crunching those feet, I would whine to get some too. They have bones and are also an excellent source of glucosamine because of all the joints, etc.
If you come across duck feet, those are equally as good. Unless they've already been deboned. Yes, Asian markets sell deboned duck feet for stuffing!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Cali, Feb 7 7:19 pm

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