Postings by Kagra

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Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Best way to educate people About American Pit Bull Terriers?
Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 12, '13 5:07pm PST 
You have to post pictures of next years costume! It sounds to cute and funny
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Kagra, Dec 12 5:07 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Best way to educate people About American Pit Bull Terriers?
Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 11, '13 5:32pm PST 
I know what you are going through, while I currently do not have a pit I love the breed and have fostered many (including Kagra). My golden and I are in a therapy dog group and we have a few pits in the group. I was visiting with a new member and her pit bull mix named Harley. He is a dark brindle boy with a big block head..i think he is too cute but understand why people could be intimidated (i think he is adorable). He is a registered therapy dog who pasted a test to be able to do this. Well the nurse kept avoiding Harley and coming to me and my golden. I finally asked the nurse why she was avoiding Harley and she said it was because he is a pit and they are all mean, she went on to tell me that she was shocked the group allowed pit bulls. By this time Harley and his owner were with a patient I told them to visit and Harley was laying his head in the patients lap. I looked at the nurse and pointed out that this pit bull was making more progress with this patient then my golden and I had in 6 months. this patient did not talk to anyone, her family has all but abandoned her and she is basically a mute, but here she was talking away to Harley the pit bull (she never talks to my golden).

One thing I have seen people do to their pit bulls to make them less intimidating is to paint their nails (Harley's are usually blue or green). This seems to make people think they are not as scary.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Kagra, Dec 12 5:07 pm


Behavior & Training > Safely Socializing Ria

Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 8:12am PST 
I was reading your post and it seems the incidents where she reacted badly were with female dogs and puppies (other than the intact male but who can blame her for that!) When she meet the older male golden you said she was fine. She may have some same sex aggression...

be careful with the reactive dog classes..while they are a great idea, sometimes they make the problem worse as some trainers who do this are not really sure how the classes should be run. The classes should not involve a bunch of slightly reactive dogs running around, it needs to be structured in a way that all the dogs benefit and one dog does not focus on another which can cause more of an issue.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Lupi, Apr 16 2:15 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Third Dog ?

Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 21, '13 4:31pm PST 
I have 3 females and 2 males and am always bringing in fosters (only the ones we have for a really long time end up on dogster). We have not had any issues with SSA and have had a bunch of different breeds in my house so I cannot offer much help there.

The only issue we have ever had was between my female chi, Pookie (bless her soul) and other dogs (both male and female although she mainly went after Josie). Pookie had some bad habits when we adopted her and was very protective of my mother. Usually we would have nipped the issue in the butt however Pookie was 14 yrs old with a baseball size liver tumor when we adopted her so training was out of the question...

In my experience it really depends on the dog, I have been given some dogs to foster where I have refused because I could tell it was not going to work out...others I have taken even though the shelter was saying I shouldn't take them because they dont like other animals but when observing the dog you could tell it would be fine (Kagra was one of the dogs labeled as SSA by the shelter who lived in my house with many other females and had no issues)
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Tuck, Feb 24 10:33 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Pit Bull/Shar Pei mix?

Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Tue Jul 31, '12 5:42pm PST 
I know people who foster for shar pei rescue and they have had issues with some fosters and others have been great. I think training and lots of socialization is extremely important. Pei's are strong dogs, they are very muscular. They are also very smart but tend to be stubborn when it comes to training. I have seen some that are very dog aggressive and others who could care less about other dogs.
The main thing I know about them is that their are common health issues and special grooming that is needed. Pei's can have allergies and skin infections are common due to their skin folds. The folds must be wiped out to prevent bacteria and infections. I also have heard that eye problems, like cherry eye and cataracts, are common.
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» There has since been 36 posts. Last posting by Harley (past foster dog), Nov 15 4:56 pm

Puppy Place > That weird paw thing
Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 27, '12 7:09pm PST 
Kagra my foster pit did that as do 2 of my doxies Milo and Wiggles. I think it is to help the cool floor reach their bellies...None of them were/are overweight, its just a habit. Some people have told me that it is a sign of good hips but I'm not sure.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Lola, Jul 31 12:16 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Thought we new what Bella was, now questioning it.

Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 18, '12 2:34pm PST 
The last pic does look like she has pit or American bulldog in her...Tell people whatever you want to tell them, it doesn't really matter what she is as long as you love her.
I have fostered pits and people always are scared of them. I found it was easier to tell people that they were just terrier mixes or all American mutts!
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Woofie 1988 - 2001, Jul 22 12:04 pm


Small Dogs > Socializing adopted dog/ introducing adopted dog to current dog

Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 29, '12 10:23pm PST 
I know how you feel, Maggie came to us because the shelter she was at said that she was "too aggressive to ever find a home and she wasn't worth bothering a rescue with" (and yes these are the exact words from her paperwork). I volunteered and fostered at the shelter and they knew that I had doxies so they told me they would let me have her if I wanted the "stupid dog". She was so scared, a year old, and only 6 lbs (her healthy weight is 8 lbs). I felt obligated to take her because I couldn't let her die....I remember when trying to get her out of the cage she was in and she immediately ran to the back (shaking) and when the leash kept coming towards her she tried to bite it and peed...I thought to myself what am I getting into!! Looking back I do not regret a thing! She is such a sweet girl now that she realizes that people are not always mean. It took a lot of time and training but I love her....however if I knew that I could not commit to the extensive training that she needed I don't think that I would have made her happier or improved her life in any way.

I think that you need to evaluate what you can deal with and how much energy and time you are willing to put into correcting behavior issues the dog may come with. Taking the dog and knowing that you are not comfortable and that neither dog is comfortable is not really helping the dog. Yes you will be saving it from a shelter and putting it in a better environment, but a dog that is constantly on edge is not a happy dog no matter how good its surroundings are. Maybe you could see what rescues are around and if you think the dog is a little too much due to aggressiveness toward your dog or another issue you could contact the rescues and foster the dog until a space opens up where a no kill rescue can take it or they find the right person. That way you help the dog but are not left without any options if the dog is not the right fit for your home.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jul 7 7:50 pm


Small Dogs > Socializing adopted dog/ introducing adopted dog to current dog

Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 29, '12 12:57am PST 
I have found the best way to introduce two dogs (especially if one is nervous and can be aggressive) is to take a walk in a neutral area. Have someone from the rescue walk the new dog and you walk Leo, the people should be in between the dogs (new dog, rescue person, you, Leo), don't let the dogs run up to each other, walk them and let them relax. When you think Leo has calmed down and the new dog is more comfortable, I like to switch dogs..I walk the new dog and the rescue person walks my dog, then we let them meet with me handling the new dog...I have found the if I have the leash of my own dog and the rescue acts nervous or aggressive, my dog will try and protect me instead of ignoring the new dog like they do when I don't have the leash.
Make sure that no one is tense and while walking them together, pay attention to the dogs body language...this will give you a baseline of knowing what the new dog looks like when calm so hopefully you can catch any changes in body language before any issues that could happen (fight or something) get serious.
I have introduced many rescues to my own dogs (either keepers or fosters) and its not always easy...Kagra was not very happy being in a pack at first but as long as they dont immediately try to kill each other, most issues can be corrected. If they are okay on neutral territory, then I repeat the same process in my neighborhood (walk around the block then introduce in the house).
Letting them run up to each other and get in each others face is the biggest mistake most people make, it can be very intimidating to some dogs and based on what you have told us about the little rescue, it will be scared if Leo runs up to its face and will probably snap or act aggressively.

This is my process but I know everybody has a different way to introduce two dogs, it will be interesting to see other peoples approaches.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Jul 7 7:50 pm

Small Dogs > 2 year young Pomeranian Male new to our family LOTS of questions...
Kagra

Lover girl
 
 
Barked: Tue May 22, '12 12:32pm PST 
I would definitely get him chipped, I have mine chipped and we dont pay for any of the extras but having the chip makes me feel more secure. Since he is a stray and new you never know what could scare him and cause him to take off (it has happened to me with a foster (Kagra)...she was terrified of a trash truck). Having the chip gives you a better chance of getting your pom back. The link posted is a great one for food suggestions. I personally feed my dogs Blue Buffalo Wilderness (no grain) but it is expensive and there are cheaper foods that are good ones also.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , May 22 9:48 pm

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