GO!

(Page 1 of 156: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

Choosing the Right Dog > What breeds would you recommend?
Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 18, '12 6:46pm PST 
The ones I know do well with the winters here, where temperature routinely gets into the single digits. They are a short-haired breed but they aren't as slight as most sighthounds which helps them in colder weather. One of the ones who comes to work even still tries to swim in the water dish in freezing temperatures, so I think it's more than manageable for them as long as they are outside being active.
[notify]
» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Jan 19 9:07 am

Choosing the Right Dog > What breeds would you recommend?
Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 18, '12 4:31pm PST 
I can't believe no one has recommended a Rhodesian Ridgeback yet. They're bigger, active but also willing to relax at home if nothing is going on, and with good socialization are pretty friendly. They're not the most outgoing breed around but I've known plenty who do quite well at dog parks; their owners put a lot of work to get them to that point but it's certainly doable.
[notify]
» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jan 19 9:07 am


Choosing the Right Dog > English pointer?

Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 5, '12 8:22pm PST 
You'll get different answers to that depending on the person you ask. Personally, I think GSPs can live fulfilled lives without actually hunting. Gunner is one of those dogs. He comes from champion field lines and has immense drive to hunt but he also has extreme noise phobia. Because of this I never put him through hunt training. When he was younger he was taken to fields where he got to run and chase critters as much as he pleased. He was trained to do different tasks, played off leash with other dogs, and went to functions with the family. Now that he's older he's settled down some and is usually content with playing fetch, going on walks, and spending time with the family. He's lived a more than satisfactory life.

I do believe you need to do something with them to occupy their mind and burn energy but you don't necessarily have to hunt. The rest of my GSPs will participate in dog sports in order to fulfill that need.
[notify]
» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by , Jan 6 2:42 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > English pointer?

Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 4, '12 11:41am PST 
I would suggest attending a dog show to meet good examples of both breeds. The stark differences in personality will become readily noticeable. My guess is that, being a terrier person, you'll enjoy the GSP. They are nearly as tough or spunky as terriers, but they've got a funny, bold, adorably annoying streak that I think will strike a cord with you.

As far as prey drive goes, GSPs have loads. There is very little split between working and show lines so no matter where the GSP comes from it's going to have a chase drive that includes small critters. That being said, I know many GSPs that respect smaller animals (cats, guinea pigs, even birds) that they were raised alongside. They are respectful of those small animals in the house. At the same time, many of them still hunt and chase small animals outside. If you work on impulse control I see no problem having small animals in the home, though I would never leave them together unsupervised.
[notify]
» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by , Jan 6 2:42 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Your Breed List

Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 3, '12 1:27pm PST 
My reasonable list is:

-German Shorthaired Pointer
-Otterhound
-Golden Retriever (from field lines)
-Standard Poodle
-German Wirehaired Pointer
-Basset Hound
-Bracco Italiano

My lofty list (because I won't have enough time):

-Airedale
-Lagotto Romagnolo
-Irish Setter
-Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
-Cocker Spaniel
-Duetch Wachtelhund
-Spinone Italiano
-Pudelpointer
-Field Spaniel
[notify]
» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jan 10 6:58 am

Choosing the Right Dog > English pointer?
Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 3, '12 12:24pm PST 
When choosing between the English Pointer and German Shorthaired Pointer I think it boils down to what kind of personality you prefer in a dog. Both are energetic, though in my experience GSPs need more vigorous exercise than EPs. Both are exceedingly intelligent and can be trained to a myriad of tasks. Both are friendly and get along peaceably in almost any household.

GSPs, however, are much more full-force. Their personality is in your face, on the go all the time. GSPs don't really understand the word stop. They think constantly, always looking for the next bit of fun and if you don't provide it for them they will make their own. This leads to a destructive, naughty streak if not properly exercised and stimulated. They are independent insofar as they can make their own fun, but most would much prefer to be doing things with their people. GSPs tend to perform jobs with more gusto. They enjoy the sheer fact of doing something so much and it shows in their actions. I'd call them brassy, intelligent, vigorous, pushy, and exuberant. I love these qualities but many are irked by them.

English Pointers, are the other hand, are a much more reserved and dignified breed. They are quintessentially English: prim and proper to their very core. With that, I think, comes a greatest tendency to nervousness and shyness. EPs are especially calm indoors. They are trainable, but all of the ones I've known haven't as quick-witted as GSPs. They needed more repetitions to learn something new, but once learned they are equally willing to work and please. Also, I want to note that this describes the show line EP. Some field lines more closely resemble the GSP and can actually be a bit hard-headed and more umphy.

In the end, I personally prefer the GSP in sports because I find it easier to channel their bolder personality but that is not to say that EPs are ill-suited.
[notify]
» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by , Jan 6 2:42 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Small, athletic dog?

Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 22, '11 2:03pm PST 
Have you looked into Boykin Spaniels? From the personality you want, I think a spaniel of some sort would be a good fit for you but then you have to deal with grooming. Still, if you kept one in a shorter coat the upkeep wouldn't be as time-consuming. Boykins are awesome dogs, too. Many still hunt so most lines have retained a strong working drive that you could easily channel into sports.
[notify]
» There has since been 20 posts. Last posting by , Oct 10 8:30 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 16, '11 12:45pm PST 
As others have mentioned, the biggest concern in considering a Cavalier is their health problems. I'd suggest taking a look at tthis website as well as looking at Cavs on this one. Both do a great job at explaining which diseases are common in the breed as well as which ones can be screened for and treatment options.

I don't post that to scare you off the breed but only to stress that you be extremely diligent in finding a breeder. A responsible one will be testing for all of the diseases possible in the links above as well as possess a thorough knowledge of the health of her lines. I would expect any breeder to keep in contact with all puppy owners in order to monitor offspring health.

Otherwise, Cavs are a great breed. The ones I've known have all been friendly, charming, and loving dogs. They are people-oriented and love to spend time with their families. Most have been fairly calm, not requiring too much exercise. They can adapt to their owner's pace easily. I also find them to be amenable to other pets in the home. Without knowing more about what you want in a dog, I can say that you have the potential lifestyle for a Cavalier.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Sep 17 8:58 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > buying from imported litters

Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 8, '11 2:22pm PST 
Puppy! cloud 9

I know it's early in the process but I'm jealous. I'm still a couple of years out from my much-desired puppy.
[notify]
» There has since been 21 posts. Last posting by , Sep 11 1:11 pm

Behavior & Training > Dog Agression or Rough Play??
Gunner

All legs and no- tail
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 6, '11 6:08pm PST 
I agree that this kind of behavior is hard to judge when reading written accounts. Even seeing it firsthand doesn't always make judging it any easier. It could honestly be either, or a mixture of both.

You did, however, mention a few things that would concern me. First is her age. Luna is two years old meaning that she's probably just reaching adult maturity. With that comes a settling into adult personality and it's not uncommon for a two year old dog to become less tolerant of meeting new dogs. These dogs are typically fine with dogs they met before adulthood, as well as select dogs met later in life.

Second, you said she approaches dogs head-on. Has she always done this? In the dog world this is viewed as quite threatening. Normal, friendly, greeting ritual involves dogs approaching from the sides, usually with loose, curved bodies. Now, sometimes dogs approach head-on because they lack social skills and, for want of a better phrase, don't know any better. Luna sounds like a well-socialized dog and I would therefore believe she knows the signals she's sending. Her hackles being raised could either be high arousal or part of a more aggressive intention. You also said she hops over the dogs if she does get the chance to pin them. I would infer that this is lateral movements and definitely a part of play ritual. As you can tell, she seems to be sending mixed signals.

Third, it sounds as though she practices rough play on a regular basis. This in and of itself is not a bad thing, but it does mean she is used to playing roughly. That kind of play style can easily lead to high arousal and, depending on the dogs involved, spill over into aggression. She is familiar with the Boxers meaning the likelihood of that happening is less, but put her with unfamiliar dogs and it certainly is a possibility.

Honestly, I would monitor her closely when meeting new dogs. While she may be trying to elicit play, she is doing so rudely and eventually a dog is going to react negatively. It also could be that she is no longer comfortable meeting new dogs in which case I would limit her greetings to those that you feel will go smoothly and positively.
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Sep 6 6:08 pm

(Page 1 of 156: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.