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Service & Therapy Dogs > Choosing a dog to be a service dog
Isaac

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Barked: Wed May 8, '13 1:53pm PST 
The best chance of success would actually be to get a dog from a program that trains and places service dogs.

If you have a lot of experience training working dogs, then training the dog yourself may work out. As you've already experienced, though, it's not uncommon to have to wash a dog out. If you go with a program, you get a fully trained dog and don't take that risk.

If you are going to train the dog yourself, your best chance of success is to have a professional trainer with experience with service dogs select the dog for you. They would know what to look for and how to best evaluate the dog to make sure it's a good service dog candidate.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , May 11 7:43 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Renting an apartment and paperwork required
Isaac

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Barked: Wed May 8, '13 1:50pm PST 
I don't think you have to disclose what your disability is, but they can require a letter from your health care provider that states you have a disability and need a service dog to mitigate that disability. The Fair Housing Act doesn't say anything about them not being able to require that kind of documentation if it's obviously from looking at you that you are disabled.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , May 17 11:39 am


Dog Laws & Legislation > My dog bit a small dog

Isaac

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Barked: Sat Apr 20, '13 5:46pm PST 
Wow, you are lucky your dog didn't bite the owner instead of the little dog on her lap! If your dog bites and you can't keep a muzzle on him, I don't think you should be walking him in a public place. I would stick to your own yard.
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by , May 8 2:02 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Too much info patches

Isaac

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Barked: Thu Apr 18, '13 3:28pm PST 
My dog's vest has one patch on each side, both of which say Service Dog - Please Do Not Pet Me. I don't know why some people want patches that announce what disability they have. I don't want to announce that to everyone that happens to see me out with my dog.
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by , Apr 27 5:11 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Teaching a scent alert.

Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 11:20pm PST 
You might be thinking of two different things. An alert is when a dog predicts something is going to happen, like when a dog tells you you're going to have a seizure before the seizure starts. Dogs don't alert to low blood sugar, meaning they don't tell you your sugar is going to drop before it does drop. They signal you when your sugar has dropped. A signal is when they tell you something has happened that you might not have noticed yet.

So it seems like you are saying you want your dog to signal you when you have started to sweat more. One problem I foresee is that your dog may not be able to tell if you are sweating because you are starting to have a flashback or if you are sweating because it's hot or because you're exercising or what. Your dog would be signalling you a lot in the summer time!

Are there other things you do when you start to have a flashback that your dog could be trained to pick up on, things you don't do other times? Like, when I start to have an anxiety attack, I often do sweat, but other things I do include clenching my fists and rocking back and forth a bit.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Apr 22 7:46 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Changing the alert of medical alert dog
Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 11:15pm PST 
If you really won't notice that she is walking in front of you or sitting on your feet, then yeah, I would train her to alert in a different way. What good does an alert do you if you don't notice it? If you will notice those things, though, then why change it?
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Service & Therapy Dogs > Cleaning your SD when you come back home?

Isaac

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Barked: Tue Apr 16, '13 11:13pm PST 
If he's really dirty, I give him a bath. If he just has dirty feet or something, I wipe him off with a wet cloth.
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Service & Therapy Dogs > The United States Service Dog Registry

Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 14, '13 12:13pm PST 
One problem with this company is that anyone can buy a registration from them. It in no way means your dog is a real service dog. Your dog might be, but I could registered a stuffed dog as a service dog with them. They do nothing to confirm that I am even disabled or that my dog has any training whatsoever. So many dishonest people that just want to take their pets into public places buy a registration from them.

Another problem is that many business owners will think if one person with a service dog has an ID like this, all should. They don't realize it basically a scam and anyone can register a dog, even if it's not really a service dog. So that does make things difficult for people with real service dogs that don't want to spend money for a useless "registration" kit.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Apr 14 5:59 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Summer activities with your SD

Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 6, '13 5:08am PST 
Whether you can take an SDiT with you to those places depends on a couple things. First, federal law (the ADA) doesn't not give you the right to take an SDiT into public places where pets aren't typically permitted. State law might, though, depending on your state. In some states, only professional trainers can take SDiT's into public like that, but not owner trainers (that's the case in Ohio, where I live). So check your state's laws. Of course, you can always ask them management if you can bring your SDiT even though they aren't required to allow you to do so by law.

Second, how far along is your dog in his training? Will he be able to behave appropriately for as long as you're going to be there? If he is inappropriate or disruptive, you can be asked to remove him, but beyond that, for a dog in training, he might end up learning bad habits if he behaves poorly.

Third, will you be going on rides or in the pool at the water park? You can't take your dog on rides or in the pool. Who will watch your dog while you do those things?
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Service & Therapy Dogs > We have a new trainer -- what do you think?
Isaac

1278829
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 5, '13 9:51am PST 
Did you talk to her about these concerns?

Of course you can just take from her what you want and ignore the rest, but that may not be very effective. Some training methods don't work well if you only do them halfway. In addition, your dog may get confused if she does things one way with him and you do things another way.

I mostly use reward based training with Isaac, although I do correct him when needed. I used a prong collar for a short time with him because he pulled on the leash a lot and I'm not physically strong enough to deal with that any other way. I haven't used it in a long time, though.

I am not a fan of CM at all. I think his methods are borderline abusive and if she emulates him, I would personally find another trainer.

I want my dog to enjoy his work, and he does. Oh, once in a great while I ask him to do something when he'd rather do something else, like a couple weeks ago he was busy playing with a toy and I needed him to unload the dryer for me. But he normally loves unloading the dryer. Training should definitely be fun for a dog. Isaac thinks it's a great game when we work on training stuff. He loves it.
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