Postings by Corky

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Behavior & Training > "Those kind of people" rant

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 18, '13 8:26pm PST 
Your dogs being late for their licenses is not an issue of their size; it's an issue of your not having gotten their licenses on time. When Corky was first arrived, and I went to City Hall the register him, they wanted to know WHY I was licensing a dog in December. "New dog" was a perfectly acceptable explanation--but it doesn't apply in your case.

And, sadly, fair or unfair, when you have large and potentially "scary" dogs, you do need to be more careful than the person with a dog not viewed as "scary." You cannot rely on a neighbor's fence that you already know your dogs have defeated more than once.

I know which dogs in my neighborhood are walked regularly, which ones are effectively contained--and which ones get out often enough that everyone knows them. By name. And exactly where they live and what the excuses are that the owners have for the weak spot in their fence not being fixed. When they beat up a shih tzu mix in her own yard, there were no end of witnesses to the fact that these dogs often get out, they are sweet with people, but the female is dog-aggressive and the male follows her lead.

The owners felt ill-used, but every one of us who walk our dogs regularly have had run ins with those two boxers. Seriously, even the guy with the Doberman and the chihuahua, who I think is an idiot, effectively fixed the weak spot in his fence the first time his dogs got out.

Contain your dogs.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Sabi, Jun 19 11:08 am

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Should I bring my dog back to the shelter...
Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Mon May 6, '13 3:34pm PST 
Everybody who tells you what mix she is is guessing. A dog can wind up looking very different from what you'd predict if you knew their ancestry.

Even if she has cattle dog in her, you know that's not the only thing in her, and she could have the looks without the working drive, for instance. If your reason for considering returning her is concern about what might happen, STOP! Take some time to get acquainted with her, give her some time to settle in and show her true personality, and see what she's really like.

Even if she has a lot of cattle dog in her, if you enjoy/think you could come to enjoy dog sports, you CAN keep her in an apartment.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Jackson Tan, May 9 3:11 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > I can't catch him but I can count all of his ribs :-( Help???

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Mon May 6, '13 3:29pm PST 
What a lucky little dog that you have her now, and that your neighbor helped!

We will forget those other, wretched people, and so will she, in time.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Teeko, May 14 10:27 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Returned an adopted rescued doxie and regretting it. Should I try to get her back?

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 20, '13 11:13am PST 
Where are you, Guest? If you're in the northeast, pm Tiller. She can guide you wonderfully, and I know a nice, calm dog who would love to have two people! laugh out loud
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Apr 21 8:15 am


Food & Nutrition > Pain in the Whiskers Dog...

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 14, '13 8:25pm PST 
Third that.

The girls get a reasonable amount of time to eat their food, and if they don't, it's picked up and they wait until the next mealtime. This is a rare event, although Addy occasionally will choose to skip a meal.

It has not so far ever been an issue with Corky, who seems deeply grateful to have his own food in his own bowl in his own crate, and he eats it quickly just in case I might change my mind.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Corky, Apr 14 8:25 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > What does it take to foster?
Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 2:37pm PST 
You need to be able, obviously, to handle another dog in your home. This depends not just on you but on your current dogs--will they be okay with it? Or at least cope without creating problems?

Different groups provide different amounts of support for fosters. I mean in terms of the cost. Some groups only handle the vet care; some also provide food, toys, etc.

The most important thing about which group you work with is that you understand what they are committing to and what you are committing to, and that you are confident that they will do what they say. No surprises!

You need to be able give a dog love and care without getting too attached. You're going to be saying good-bye to this dog in a few months. If you can't say good-bye, you're going to be a "foster failure" and have another permanent resident in your household.

Be clear with yourself and with the rescue group or shelter what you are able to handle, as a practical matter. I have a No Big Dogs rule, and I'm willing to work with fear, but not with aggression. Corky is also a special needs dog; he's blind. Can you handle a dog with a handicap of some kind? What kinds of handicaps? Can you handle a dog with ongoing medical needs, or who needs to be treated for heartworm? Or do you really need to stick to basically healthy dogs?

Don't let guilt lead you to agree to something you're not prepared for. It's no kindness to the dog, as well as being deeply unfair to yourself and your household.

Any dog you foster helps that dog and another dog, who gets the shelter space the dog you're fostering had occupied. That's true even if you take only "easy" dogs, which then frees up a space in a foster home that can handle a more challenging dog.

Get to know the people you'd be working with, because trust and confidence between you and the rescue or shelter is vital.
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» There has since been 25 posts. Last posting by Misty, Mar 6 4:49 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > tiny dog/toy poodle questions!

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 8, '13 8:09pm PST 
Great news! Congratulations!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Corky, Feb 8 8:09 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > tiny dog/toy poodle questions!

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 2, '13 5:52am PST 
First, the potty training:

Corky is from a hoarding situation, and conditions were pretty filthy, but they were not confined to crates. He's adapted very well to being expected to potty outside. So yes, you'd be doing potty training, but you won't necessarily be dealing with "dirty dog" syndrome, which is common in puppy mill rescues.

As for the health issues: It's true that small breed dogs tend to be healthier and longer-lived, but under-sized or "teacup" small breed dogs are often so small because of underlying health problems and/or really crappy breeding. In a hoarding situation, you can pretty much count on really crappy breeding.

Blindness, due to progressive retinal atrophy, is a significant risk in poodles. If she's affected, she would eventually, probably around age five to six, go blind. It would be gradual and painless and doesn't have to limit her life. Corky is blind, born blind, and he gets around just fine. An older Crested in the home of the breeder Addy and Dora came from, the lady's first Crested, went blind from PRA and lived to be eighteen, happy and secure, and getting around her home and her yard just fine.

Other health problems in poodles, especially toy poodles--many of them would have shown themselves by age three. Embrace Pet Insurance has decent rundown on health issues in poodles.

I had, for a few years, a "teacup" cat, the runt of her litter--less than half the size of her littermates. She was healthy and happy and a joy to have in my life for four years, and then she died. Massive organ failure. Her organs were under-sized even for such a tiny kitty, and not up to the task of maintaining. The organs compensated for as long as they could, and then they failed. And I would adopt her again in a heartbeat. I seriously would not regard concern about this possibility as a reason not to adopt your little hoarder rescue.

Depending on what the hoarding situation was, exactly, she may well be, as Corky is, very confident with other dogs. The thing about hoarding is that there are always other animals around, and socializing with other dogs is not a big problem.

Obviously, with a dog that tiny, you do need to be careful of how the other dogs react. I see that Floppy is a chihuahua mix, so you probably have some experience with this already. However, with such a tiny one, you will find yourself picking her up for her own safety, sometimes, because she can get stepped on or mistaken for a toy or prey by a bigger dog who isn't at all "dog aggressive." So it's not just a matter of her probably quite decent dog socialization; it's also a matter of being aware of what the other dog might be thinking.

One of my other dogs, Dora, is just eight and a half pounds, not as small as this little girl, but pretty small. She enjoys her walks, and does fine with other dogs, though I'm careful around very big dogs whom we don't know.

I have met people with very tiny Yorkies, dogs so tiny you would think that dog can't walk outside--and they do absolutely fine, as long as their people are aware of things that might be a risk to them but not to other dogs, and are ready to pick them up when necessary for their safety.

So, yeah, there may be some increased health concerns, but if you like this little girl, there's no reason she shouldn't be a wonderful new family member for you.

I hope at least some of this is helpful.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Corky, Feb 8 8:09 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Meet Corky!

Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 11, '12 11:42am PST 
The girks have serious doubts, but not in any way that alarms me. I think they'll adjust faster once Corky isn't isolated, and isn't getting Special Attention they're not able to participate in.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Duncan , Dec 14 8:12 am

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Meet Corky!
Corky

Looking for my- forever home!
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 11, '12 6:07am PST 
Corky is my new foster, from Southpaws Express. He's the sweetest little guy, loves people, always wants to cuddle.

Corky is blind, but having been that way from birth, he doesn't let it slow him down much. He's going to make the right adopter very, very happy.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Duncan , Dec 14 8:12 am

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