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Dog Health > Shorty's tummy issues. Advice?
Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 4:37am PST 
Probiotics are a very good idea. Dogs with sensitive stomachs must be switched gradually to a new diet. Prescription diets are the best choice for dogs with any serious medical problem than can be controlled through diet.
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» There has since been 24 posts. Last posting by , Dec 22 10:39 am

Dog Health > Parvo/distemper and ? vaccine combo?
Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 4:35am PST 
I’m very sorry to hear that you’ve experienced Parvovirus in a dog. But, being taken from his mother at 5 weeks old opens him up to a range of problems. I’m glad to hear that he received all his vaccines. I understand your concern regarding vaccination. Puppies are the most likely candidates of a Parvovirus infection. I’ve honestly never heard of distemper in an adult dog, but I’m sure there are cases. My dogs get their core vaccines every year, as recommended by my veterinarian. I’ve talked to my vet about over vaccination and he doesn’t seem to be too concerned with it. I still get my flu shot every year, as my doctor recommends this. There is definitely no cut and dry answer regarding vaccinations (or much else for that matter).
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Sabi, Dec 7 5:52 am


Dog Health > Looks like Bunny will be going in for his rabies shots ASAP

Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 4:31am PST 
Yes, I’m just starting to realize that things I believed were fairly cut and dry and in fact anything but! I have no heard of either of the people you mentioned. I believe that the rabies vaccine lasts much longer than three years, though. My dogs are given their rabies vaccines every three years. Your vet must have reasoning for wanting to give the vaccine more often. What state do you live in?

All my dogs have been licensed at the humane society. They are required to be licensed at 16 weeks of age or within 30 days of acquiring the dog (if the dog is older). If I fail to register my dogs, the city sends a citation and I must pay a fine. I will use Jocelyn as an example for the vaccination schedule I follow. Jocelyn was vaccinated for Parvovirus at 5 weeks old by her breeder, and then given a combination vaccine (adenovirus, hepatitis, distemper, Parainfluenza, and Parvo) and Coronavirus vaccine at 6 weeks. At 12 weeks I had her vaccinated for rabies, given a combination vaccine, Leptospirosis, Lyme, and Coronavirus. She gets a yearly combination vaccine, Leptospirosis, Coronavirus, and Lyme. She gets her rabies every three years.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Bunny, Dec 11 1:56 pm


Dog Health > My dog has lots of Smegma and he keeps licking his groin

Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:40am PST 
I can't say that this is my absolute favorite topic. But, penile discharge is natural. But, if your dog is constantly licking himself, he needs to see a vet.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Bianca, Dec 6 7:09 am


Dog Health > Curly rear dew claws

Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:38am PST 
Next time, have the vet clip the dews. Most dogs have dark nails and it is impossible to see the quick. Don't let dews grow so long! Thankfully, dew claws are not big bleeders, as the quick is farther back than it is on the rest of the nails. I recommend you have them removed completely. If you cut the quick on the dew, it can bleed. You will need to have quick stop powder on hand. If you do cut the quick, apply pressure. Rear dew claws are rarely very firmly attached. Most are just hanging by little more than skin. There may be some tissue in there, but very little. I've never had a dew claw bleed on my before. They have gotten pretty long on my dogs before. Just don't cut it too short. The longer you let the nail grow, the longer the quick is going to grow. Dew claws don't wear down on cement or asphalt like the other nails do.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 2:38 am

Dog Health > Does anyone know what this condition affecting my dog's back legs is called?
Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:33am PST 
Was an x-ray done to make sure this wasn't a broken bone? It could also be a torn ligament. Possibly nothing more than a muscle strain. I would also suspect arthritis. Arthritis causes lameness in dogs. Only a vet can diagnose what is going on. Are there any external signs of damage? If the limb is dangling, it is probably a fractured bone. Severe fractures can even pierce the skin. You may notice bleeding from these. Was your dog accidently injured in any way? Don't move your dog's affected leg to much. Just restrain it so he can't use it until you know what is going on. You need to check for broken bones. If he is just not bearing all his weight on the leg, it probably isn't a fracture. I recommend splinting the leg. Then, put him on crate rest. If there is still limping after 24 hours of splinting and crate rest, see the vet.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Dec 7 5:32 am


Dog Health > Urinating a lot.. Trouble?

Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:28am PST 
There could be a lot of things going on here. Your dog needs diagnostic testing to reveal what is going on. Your dog needs to see a veterinarian. Your dog obviously has a problem. This is not normal. I suspect a urinary tract infection. Because of their anatomy, females are more susceptible to urinary tract infections than males. Females have a short urethra. Young dogs also do not have fully developed immune systems and cannot fight off infection as easily as older dogs. Bladder infections are very irritating to the bladder wall. This is my theory, but there could be something else going on. Bladder stones can also cause bladder irritation. In an older dog, I would suspect a hormone imbalance. This is very serious. Some dogs suffer from psychogenic polydypsia. These dogs usually have very neurotic owners.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 2:28 am


Dog Health > SNORING!! Is there a cure?

Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:23am PST 
It's very common for dogs to snore. It is caused by an obstruction of the nasal passages. You need to understand why your dog is snoring before you can try to stop it. Overweight dogs snore because they have excess tissue around their throat. Dogs with allergies snore because of the excess mucus in their nasal passages. Trees are a common allergen for dogs. Short-nosed dog breeds will snore because they have flattened windpipes. Pekingese are the worst when it comes to this! Dogs that live in a home with a smoker will usually snore, too. Never smoke indoors if you have pets! Dogs with colds will snore until their noses are clear. If your pup has allergies, clean her bedding every single day. Only walk her outside when the pollen level is low. Vacuum at least once a week. Make sure to exercise her daily, too.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 2:23 am


Dog Health > Is it ok that i wake my babies up when they are dreaming?!

Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:19am PST 
Waking up a sleeping dog is a great way to get yourself bitten! It will not be on purpose, but as a normal response to fear. Let sleeping dogs lie. It's not just a saying! A dog will react the way it's owner reacts. For example, if you coo coo a dog that is scared of thunder, it will see this as a reward for the fearful behavior. It sounds crazy, but that is how dogs think! I doubt your dog is having any bad dreams. Your dog is probably just dreaming about running. Jocelyn, Johnathon and Margie all do this. Don't coddle. I never coddle my dogs. It's never good to wake a dog, person, or any other animal up during a dream. Jocelyn makes these awesome whooping noises when she dreams! What would be the purpose of waking your dog up? Just let her sleep. I'm pretty sure my dogs are just dreaming about running.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 5 2:19 am

Dog Health > Parvo/distemper and ? vaccine combo?
Jocelyn

Is it time to- eat?
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 5, '12 2:15am PST 
Parvovirus is highly contagious. The virus attacks the intestinal tract. It also attacks the white blood cells. Dogs with parvo will become very lethargic. Once again, this is a HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS virus! It is also highly resistant. Unvaccinated dogs can come into contact with the virus during something as simple as a daily walk. This virus must be diagnosed by a veterinarian. It is diagnosed using the ELISA test. Vets use a stool sample to test. Unfortunately, it is not 100% accurate all the time. Puppies are at the greatest risk for parvovirus infection. Wolves, coyotes, and foxes can also contract and spread the virus. Rottweilers are at the greatest risk for infection. Make sure to keep your dog up to date on vaccines! The parvo vaccine is a core vaccine. It is found in a variety of combination vaccines.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Sabi, Dec 7 5:52 am

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