Postings by Shem

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Choosing the Right Dog > The most challenging breed?

Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 4, '12 2:45pm PST 
Exactly that! I'd like to know what you guys personally find challenging, whether it be low-drive, emotional, stubborn, sensitive, or too-smart-for-his-own-good. wink

For me, I'll define challenging as a dog who can easily out-smart its handler. For this category, which do you think is the most challenging?
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» There has since been 26 posts. Last posting by , Dec 10 7:03 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > The most challenging breed?
Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 3, '12 11:01pm PST 
In your opinion, what is the most challenging breed, in general? And why?

I personally lack the knowledge to judge. In my life, Shem is my second doberman and my first dog that I can realistically call my own and not "my family's". My family's first doberman, Alex, was already four years old when I was born.

So, I'd love to read about your various understanding and how you've come to define the term "challenging" when used on dog breeds.smile

-Shem-
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» There has since been 37 posts. Last posting by , Dec 10 7:03 pm


New to Dogster/Tips & Tricks > dog of the day?

Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 13, '12 10:59pm PST 
How exactly are the dogs of the days and weeks chosen? thinking
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Flicka ~ CGC, Aug 14 4:03 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Funny story...

Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 26, '12 7:36pm PST 
Congrats to you guys on your decision! cloud 9
I don't want to be a pessimist either, but it sounds like the old owners might have set him loose intentionally.... UGH. :
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Angel, Aug 3 10:54 pm


Puppy Place > That weird paw thing

Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 26, '12 7:30pm PST 
Sorry you didn't get responses so far!
I don't think the splayed legs have to do with being overweight- I've seen perfectly healthy dogs do that since puppyhood and just keep going with it their entire lives. It just seems like one of those physical habits, like if a person likes to cross their legs when sitting... or have them splayed. wink Not anything to worry about.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Lola, Jul 31 12:16 pm

Behavior & Training > How do you find the right treats/toys your dog likes?
Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Thu Jul 26, '12 7:21pm PST 
Some dogs are just not trick or treat dogs! There may be some mysterious toy or treat out there that really strikes his liking, but for now, he might just be the kind of dog that is content with your attention and going for walks, or whatever you both normally do together.

If you're really intent on teaching him tricks, is he responsive to your happiness? Some of the dogs I've met that aren't riled up with treats will learn tricks just for praise from the owners or to see their owners get really happy and excited when they do something right.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Jul 27 6:51 pm


Behavior & Training > How to stop a dog from barking/lunging when he sees another dog on a walk (am I right? and...)

Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 5:38pm PST 
I'm asking this for a friend's golden doodle Shauntley, not Shem. Just for the record. wink

The thread title is pretty much the problem. I'm helping her train Shauntley when I get to see them, which is only about once every few months. This is how I told her to go about correcting:

When approaching another dog coming their direction, right when Shauntley either barks are starts to lunge, turn around quickly 180 and walk in the opposite direction with an "uh uh". Be calm and collected, don't show anger... just rinse and repeat, until Shauntley manages to reach the other dog calmly.
I already emphasized socialization, but she's hesitant to bring Shauntley out to a populated dog place (outdoor mall, beach) for fear that Shauntley will bark her head off/make a ruckus and cause embarrassment.

But the thing is that she doesn't have a constant backup of stranger dogs to practice with. She doesn't react the same way with Shem, because they're already familiar with each other.

So wondering what're other options to train without the aid of stranger dogs?

and note:, she's lunging and barking for desire to meet/greet/play, not aggression. And she's 2 years old.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jul 25 7:28 pm


Behavior & Training > Heeling on leash

Shem

1260493
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 25, '12 3:32pm PST 
I'd start reeling in the leash a few seconds before you know you're about to stop walking. Have the leash length short enough that she would naturally sit very close to you when she does, and click-treat her when she manages to sit particularly close and facing the right direction (if you guys are doing clicker training). It may take a load of repetition, depending on the dog, but she'll eventually get the point. smile
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Ridley, Jul 25 3:55 pm

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