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Food & Nutrition > Anyone else sick of the food reps?
Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 18, '13 7:30am PST 
If a rep tries to convince me how great their food is, I'll just do the whole 'point behind them and say "Look, a flying squirrel!"' routine and run off. Chances are I've already checked out their brand and found it to be less than high-quality anyway laugh out loud

Relating to this topic, I once met this employee at Petsmart who kept insisting that my dog was fat (she wasn't). It took me about 10 minutes to finally escape from her, as after calling my dog fat she started going on about what and how much I should be feeding her, telling me I probabaly wasn't excercizing her enough, etc. Apparently she thought she knew more than my vet, who not more than a week before had seen her for a checkup and said she was in great condition.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Feb 20 8:51 pm

Behavior & Training > Need help with a pouncing puppy
Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 18, '13 6:33am PST 
Sorry for the double post. My phone kinda has a mind of its own and does all sorts of random crap confused I honestly have no idea why they call it a smart phone, as mine gets a kick out of acting dumb just to annoy me shrug
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Feb 18 6:33 am


Behavior & Training > Need help with a pouncing puppy

Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 18, '13 6:19am PST 
Try keeping him on a very long line and correct him whenever he starts mowing other doggies down. Then, right after you correct him put him in a little time out by either holding him till he's calm or giving him crate time. Eventually he'll figure out that the only way to get in on the action is to play nice.

Also, it helps to put puppies with older, calmer dogs. An older dog probably wouldn't put up with the pup's behavior, and in essence would help you with the training by giving a growl or nip.

Hope this helped smile
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Feb 18 6:33 am


Behavior & Training > Need help with a pouncing puppy

Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 18, '13 6:17am PST 
Try keeping him on a very long line and correct him whenever he starts mowing other doggies down. Then, right after you correct him put him in a little time out by either holding him till he's calm or giving him crate time. Eventually he'll figure out that the only way to get in on the action is to play nice.

Also, it helps to put puppies with older, calmer dogs. An older dog probably wouldn't put up with the pup's behavior, and in essence would help you with the training by giving a growl or nip.

Hope this helped smile
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 18 6:33 am


Behavior & Training > Fear Aggressive dog

Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 18, '13 5:17am PST 
Well, I doubt he will just 'settle down' on his own. This is not just a normal part of a young dog's behavior that he will grow out of, it's a problem that will probably be there for life (and maybe get worse) if you don't start working with him on it. You may need a trainer, but there's also a good chance you can resolve it on your own. Give some more info about his past, what exactly the other dogs do that trigger his aggressive response, and how you react to it (do you yell, jerk his collar, etc.)
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Feb 22 4:46 am

Behavior & Training > I should have asked this 8 years ago.
Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 3:59pm PST 
Actually, my dog usually ends up apologizing to ME whenever we have accidental bodily collisions. I'll step on her foot or whatever, which makes her yelp, which startles the living crap outta me (I'm one of those people who can watch horror movies without so much as blinking, but if the toast pops out of the toaster or something, I'm like eek and go into cardiac arrest shrug), which then causes me to lose my footing and trip over her as she tries to scramble out of my way, ending in me doing a face-plant on the ground. By the time it's all over, I have a bruise the size of a baseball smack-dab on my forehead and she seems just fine. confused

Klutziness + jumpiness + dog = lots of face-plants on the ground. An equation I'm well acquainted with wink
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Feb 18 2:39 pm


Small Dogs > Opinions on dog parks...

Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 9:51am PST 
I know this is kinda late, but I just wanted to add that I don't like dog parks. There are a lot of irresponsible dog owners with questionable IQs who think it's a perfectly good idea to take their 89 lb, dog-aggressive or overly rough and rambunctious rottweiler and allow it to go rampaging about without supervision while they talk to their buddies on the phone about the latest who-slept-with-who drama. It only takes one bite (aggressive or accidental) from a big dog to kill a little one. Plus, dogs tend to pick up bad behaviors from other dogs, and I find that a lot of the dogs in dog parks have the manners of rabid demon hell hounds confused

A better way to socialize your dog (regardless of size) is to make friends with people who have well-behaved pooches and have doggie play dates smile
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Apr 22 8:48 am


Small Dogs > Collars & Leashes! What do you use?

Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 9:26am PST 
I just use a collar and flexi leash. It's my favorite type of leash, 'cause it's the closest thing to off leash walking since it lets 'em have more freedom to move and do doggie things without getting all tangled up in it. I'm not a huge fan of harnesses unless you have a pug or bull dog. I just think they seem less comfortable and more restrictive than a collar, but maybe that's just me shrug
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Feb 25 6:20 am


Small Dogs > This is the second time I have been lost.

Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 17, '13 9:02am PST 
I hear ya. My little Zoe likes to take off when we go out at dusk for a final frizby game, and her being black and fast as a warp- drive space ship means she can dissappear on me in the blink of an eye. Thankfully we live in the country on decent acerage, so I don't really worry about her little escapades into the night since she always comes back on her own after a few minutes.

If you want to go a little more high-tech than bells, you could always get one of those GPS collar things that show exactly where your dog is. I plan on getting one for Zoe so I at least know where she goes when she ditches me smile
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Feb 17 9:02 am

Behavior & Training > My dog jumps up on people at Bark Park
Zoe

The- Schnauzinator
 
 
Barked: Sat Feb 16, '13 3:34pm PST 
You have to teach him three things:

1) Jumping up is a "bad" behavior

2) The appropriate behavior is to _____ instead. (sit/ lie down/ etc.)

3) Self control

First, to teach him that the behavior is wrong you have to correct him every time he does it. At first you should keep him on a leash so you can better control him. A simple no (said calmly but with authority) and a slight jerk of the leash should do as far as correcting goes. Ask the person he's trying to jump on to completely ignore him. They shouldn't look at, talk to, or pet him. Then, make him either sit or lie down (sitting might be easier to get him to do when he's excited) and give him a treat and tell him what a marvelous doggie he is (but don't praise him excitedly or he'll just jump right back up again). It might be easier to have him sit with his back to the person at first so he'll only focus on you, the treat, and sitting.

Once he's calmed down, you can have the person come up and pet him. As soon as he gets excited and stops sitting, correct him and have the person stop petting him and move away, then start the process all over again. If he starts pulling on the leash to get at the person, have either the other person or you walk away from each other. Eventually he'll realize that the only way to get people to pay him attention is if he sits calmly while they pet him. At some point when he's sitting and not jumping reliably you can allow him to stay standing when he greets people, and you can stop using treats. The main thing is to just get him to realize that jumping actually deprives him of attention. Also, it might be easier to try all this in calmer settings at first, as its hard to get a dog to focus when there's a bunch of overexcited pooches running all around him.

To teach him patience, it might help to extend this practice to other areas in his life. Make him wait (increasing the length of time as he gets better) for treats, his dinner, before throwing the ball, etc.

Hope this helped smile
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Feb 16 4:46 pm

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