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Choosing the Right Dog > Would a Chinese Crested be a good match for child?
Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 15, '13 2:04pm PST 
Okay, hit send by accident. A friend has Westies. They are happy, playful dogs, very sturdy, and white and fluffy. I fon't know how much care that cost needs, and as I think I said, my friends who have them are an adult couple, so I don't know anout their suitability for kids.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Oct 20 12:29 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > Would a Chinese Crested be a good match for child?
Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 15, '13 2:01pm PST 
I think your page said you're in Virginia? If so, a powderpuff in something close to full coat, would need a coat only in the coldest weather you're likely to get. My girls come from Maine, where even the hairless will go out the dog door to potty naked even in -20F temps. The hairless DO need to dress to go out to play, which I can see why that's a deal breaker for you. You would have to a fair bit of grooming, though. Coat types do vary, and some, like Addy, mat easily and need lots of attention, while others have silkier, easier-care coats.

A poodle in show trim, you'll need regular visits (every 4-6 weeks on average) to a professional groomer.

I'm going to make another suggestion, though I don't know what health questions to tell you to ask, or how they are with kids. West Highland White Terriers.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Oct 20 12:29 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Would a Chinese Crested be a good match for child?

Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 15, '13 7:30am PST 
One more suggestion I should have made last night. Go to dog shows. It's a great way to see the dogs, and meet people who have them, breeders and exhibitors. Get a program and don't approach people when they're about to take a dog into the ring, and most dog people are pretty friendly. The fact that you're right now trying to learn more and be sure the breed is a good match, rather than looking to buy a puppy right away, will be a point in your favor.

It will also be a chance to see other small or smallish breeds that might also be good matches. In addition to Cresteds and mini (not toy) poodles, and--did you mention Havanese?--rat terriers and the (closely related) American Hairless Terrier often do well with kids. Havanese, by the way, are another hair-coated breed that, like poodles and powderpuff Chinese Cresteds, will need more grooming.

Cavalier King Charles, the biggest "toy" breed, wonderful personalities, but you really need to do your health research there, and know what questions to ask. My impression, which may be false, is that Cavalier breeders are not quite as open about the health issues as Crested and poodle breeders.

A bit larger, maybe too big for what you want, cocker spaniels. A well bred cocker is a wonderful dig to play with a child. My second dog was a cocker. smile (My first was a border collie. I remember her fondly. My mother remembers her fondly. But I was ten, and it was the 1960s. My dig and I roamed all over town and the wild part of the park together. I think that's considered neglect if not endangerment today. From what you've said, Do. Not. Go. There.)

Anyway, have fun. smile
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Oct 20 12:29 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Would a Chinese Crested be a good match for child?

Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 14, '13 9:43pm PST 
No, Chinese Cresteds are not particularly fragile. I wouldn't have any serious concern about a Crested with an eight-year-old who has good impulse control and has decent adult supervision and guidance. If the breed history is even halfway correct, they were shipboard ratters on Chinese ships (the reason they are "Chinese" Cresteds despite the fact that we now know they originated in Central or South America.)

If you are going to buy a puppy, rather than getting an adult rescue, you want to find a good breeder. Among the things that good breeders will do are genetic testing of the parents for PRA (progressive retinal atrophy), PLL (primary lens luxation), annual CERF testing of the eyes, and OFA or PennHIP screening of knees and elbows.

If the puppy's parents and relatives have good skin, the puppy will, with good care, have good skin. My girls, one powderpuff and one hairless, both have excellent skin.

They also both have full sets of teeth. Poor dentition in hairless Cresteds turns out not to be inevitable, and the better breeders have been working to produce better dentition in their hairless dogs, with a fair degree of success. There are still plenty of well-bred dogs with poor or iffy dentition, but it's not inevitable, by any means.

Having said that, toy breed dogs need a little more attention to their teeth. This can be teaching the dog to accept tooth brushing, or regular use of chews that are good for the teeth. My girls get a RAW chicken wing once a week, and bully sticks. There are other good, safe options, too. Addy is seven and had her first dental last year--and only had one tooth extraction. I was proud of that. smile Dora is five and has not needed a dental yet.

It is true that a hairless dog does not mean a low-maintenance dog, necessarily. Dora is blessed with excellent skin, but she does need some grooming, and some bathing. I'd expect a dog who is playing with a child would naturally get into more things than my two do, and would need more. Some protection against the sun, either a baby-safe sunscreen or light clothing, is necessary in the summer. Winter clothing is NON-OPTIONAL for a hairless dog.

Chinese Cresteds are bright, happy, playful dogs. They are smart, and may solve problems, such as how to open doors, that you did not expect. For a child who is not too rough, they can be great playmates.

A good breeder will want to meet the whole family. A good breeder will not send a Crested puppy to a new home before 10-12 weeks.

You might want to consider at least being open to an older puppy or a young adult, dogs who were kept with intentions of showing but who just didn't pan out. They're often great pets, well-socialized, and with some basic training. Young puppy or not, the most important consideration is personality & energy level match, and a good breeder will know how to make that match.

I hope you find your perfect puppy or dog. smile
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by , Oct 20 12:29 pm


Behavior & Training > Why is my dog afraid of her clothes?

Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 8, '13 4:04pm PST 
Addy and Dora both come right to me when they see me holding up their shirts, jammies, and sweaters. Putting raincoats on them makes them much more willing to walk in the rain. Corky, on the other hand, would rather be any amount of wet and cold than wear clothes of any kind. I can get them on him, but he's half out of them before we've gone ten yards from the front door.

So Corky doesn't wear clothes. Now, he's a pug mix, and has a short but decently thick coat, and has a stocky build rather than the slender build of my Chinese Cresteds. So that makes a difference. I'm okay with him being naked, when I'd be doubtful about it for Addy and absolutely appalled for Dora in questionable weather.

If your dog in your opinion needs to wear clothes, go slowly, and make it as positive an experience as possible.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Oct 9 2:57 pm

Dog Health > How soon to spay?
Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 25, '13 4:30pm PST 
If there's an intact male around, you want two closed doors between them at all times.

And she can NEVER be outside off leash while she's in heat.

How difficult these things are will depend on your household, schedule, and experience.

Different dogs produce different amounts of blood in the process, meaning how messy it is, and how important you'll find it to keep her in doggy diapers or panties is really individual.

I went through one heat with my newest girl, Dora, unexpectedly, when she arrived last year. It was not fun, but it was totally doable.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by , Jul 3 5:13 am


Dog Health > Question about Lymes shot

Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Fri Jun 7, '13 9:17am PST 
Heartworm prevention is vital. Really. A fence won't protect them from it. You don't want to have to subject either of your boys to the unpleasant and risky treatment for heartwrm infection. Use the monthly preventative.

Lyme vaccine is a more difficult question. Lyme is nasty, but the vaccine also has a relatively high rate of significant side effects. If you live in an area where Lyme is not prevalent, the answer is no, don't do it. If you live in an area where it is prevalent, it's a tougher question, and careful, responsible vets who worry about vaccine reactions disagree. Dora's vet is quite definite that she has seen, in this Lyme-prevalent area, more bad problems from the Lyme vaccine than from Lyme. Dora had Lyme before I got her, was treated successfully, and does not get the vaccine. She now tests negative for Lyme. Addy, with a different history, does get it, though given my experience with Dora, that may change.

If you're really skeptical of vaccines and preventatives, I'd say talk to your vet about how prevalent Lyme is in your area, but this might be one to skip.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Jun 7 10:35 am


Dog Laws & Legislation > My dog bit a small dog

Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Thu May 2, '13 12:52am PST 
Excellent news, Harley! I suspect you'll find that as you relax, knowing your dog can't bite another dog again because of the muzzle, your dog will relax, too. That should make it easier to work on helping him learn more impulse control and become less reactive to other dogs.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , May 8 2:02 am


Dog Laws & Legislation > My dog bit a small dog

Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 20, '13 5:29pm PST 
I don't walk my DA dog in a muzzle. She is always on lead when around others and under my control because of that. Of course, if she managed to "grab" and/or bite a passing dog then she obviously had to much free reign to do so and the responsibility lies with me. But if a dog approached her and got bit then quite frankly it should have been under the control of it's owner to begin with!

Missy, what does this have to do with the situation the OP is in, in which their dog lunged at a small dog sitting on its owner's lap, pray tell?

The OP's dog attacked another dog, in wholly unjustifiable circumstances, and is more concerned about not getting stuck than with controlling their own dog's behavior.

OP, you need a good trainer, to help you fit and put on a good muzzle appropriately, and to work on you dog's behavior so that he's under better control.

I just got back a few minutes ago from walking the dogs, and I met one of my neighbors, who wanted to know if I knew where the two brown boxers live. They were wandering loose (not uncommon with these dogs, sadly), came into her yard, and bit her shih tzu, who is a tiny thing no bigger than Dora.

The female boxer is known to have bitch aggression, and her owners do not successfully keep the two dogs contained.

I had no hesitation about pointing my neighbor to the correct house.
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by , May 8 2:02 am

Dog Laws & Legislation > My dog bit a small dog
Dora

A-Dora-ble!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 20, '13 11:08am PST 
You were at fault; if there had been any damage, you would certainly be responsible.

If it is true there was no puncture, no blood, then she's not going to be able to sue you effectively, because she has no "damages" except the terror her little dog experienced, and which she experience on her dog's behalf.

That said, you were luckier than you deserve, and the next time could be a tragedy. Get your dog-aggressive dog a muzzle and use it when you're out in public.
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» There has since been 19 posts. Last posting by , May 8 2:02 am

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