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Dog Health > how to stop my dog leaking urine constantly

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Thu May 16, '13 2:19pm PST 
Have you had her checked out by a vet to find out why she's leaking? It may be something that could be treated. If it can't be treated, or until then, you can use a diaper on your dog to stop her from peeing all over. My girl dog also has incontinence issues due to her medication and she wears diapers in the house. It works just fine and she doesn't end up with urine all over her butt and legs like she did before. You have to change the diaper fairly often to prevent skin irritation.
You can use regular baby diapers if you cut a hole for the tail. I use them backwards as it's easier to put it on that way. You can also get reusable doggy diapers. I have this kind: http://www.poochpad.com/poochpants.html . It works very well and fits well. It's machine washable and can be dried in the dryer. It's a bit pricey but you can use it for a long time so it's cheaper than baby diapers in the long run.
I also have this kind: http://www.onlynaturalpet.com/products/SnuggEase-Reusable-Dog-Diaper s/289020.aspx . I don't like it though. It's made a bit bigger than other diapers to accommodate male dogs and as a result it's too big for my girl dog. It even looks uncomfortable for her. They may fit another dog better though and they do absorb urine very well.

My dog has no problem wearing the diaper. She pretty much accepted it right away. If your dog won't do the same there are diaper suspenders you can get which makes it harder for your dog to take the diaper off, like this one: http://www.fancynancys.com/panties/trellispantiesl.jpg

Good luck!
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by , May 22 1:28 pm

Dog Health > Has anyone here used Rimadyl for arthritis?
Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Thu May 16, '13 12:33pm PST 
Thanks for the responses. We are doing the glucosamine/chondroitin (sp) thing but it isn't helping. Neither is Aspirin. The Rimadyl is helping. My vet is basically saying that I can use it daily if a I want to and do blood work after a month or just use it as needed if I want to do that. But what's best? I thought it may be a good idea to give it daily for 2-3 weeks to get the anti-inflammatory effects of the drug and then go on to as needed. How does that sound? (the kidney will be monitored)
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , May 24 3:47 pm


Dog Health > Has anyone here used Rimadyl for arthritis?

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Wed May 15, '13 10:52pm PST 
I'm wondering if anyone here has experience with Rimadyl for arthritis or something else. If so, how did you use it for your dog? I mean, did you use it daily or just as needed on bad days? For how long did you use it? Is it more beneficial if used daily for a few weeks and then switch to as needed? Or can the dog keep taking it daily long term, assuming that the liver remains okay?

I've already discussed this issue with my vet but I didn't get much wiser so I thought I'd ask others how they used Rimadyl.

Thanks
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by , May 24 3:47 pm


Dog Health > Nightmares or vivid dreams in 11-year old dog

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 5, '13 10:57am PST 
My soon to be 11-year old male Border Collie mix has started to have nightmares and/or vivid dreams lately and I'm not sure if it's anything I should be concerned about. It's been going on for about a year or so but has increased lately in frequency. He will sometimes whine/cry in his sleep and will also jerk or move his legs. It looks to me like he's having a nightmare and is possibly dreaming that he's running, thereof the leg movements. Both my dogs have had things like this happen a few times throughout their whole lives and it's nothing I worry about - everyone has nightmares at times - but the fact that it happens so often now has me a bit concerned.
When it happens I usually wake him up by calling his name and once he opens his eyes I sit with him and pet him to comfort him. Usually he just goes back to sleep and there is nothing more to it.

The fact that he's not a youngster anymore makes me worry more about everything. He is generally a healthy dog and other than some allergies have no problems. His last bloodwork was fine and he saw the vet in October and was fine then. He is due for routine bloodwork this month so that's going to be done regardless. I doubt that the bloodwork will be helpful in figuring out the dream issue though.
What do you guys think? Is this something I should worry about? Does anyone else's dog have the same issue?

Thanks
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Feb 10 7:59 pm


Dog Health > Throwing up brown hairball

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 21, '12 9:36pm PST 
My dogs have also thrown up hair balls a couple of times. It looks similar to a cat hairball - like poop. If it's just a rare occurrence I wouldn't worry about it but if it's a regular thing I would take him in for a checkup to make sure there is nothing else going on. Spitting up furballs regularly is not really a normal thing for dogs. A diet change could very well be in order too. What does he eat? Has he been wormed lately? Could he be eating animals outside?
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Sep 22 8:43 am

Dog Health > Hyper and needy after K9 Advantage application.
Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 21, '12 9:19pm PST 
Did your dog get Advantage or K9 Advantix? They are two different products.
It does sound like a side effect but it may not be anything dangerous. If I were you I'd give him a bath to wash off any of the product that may not have been absorbed yet and call your local E-vet to see if they can give you some advice. Often times they will give you some info over the phone. You can also call the ASPCA poison center at (888) 426-4435. That does cost money ($65) and you will need a credit or debit card but it's a lot cheaper than going to the E-vet and they are THE experts on poisoning of all kinds. Even vets call them for advice. They have info on their website too: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/

At this point I'd just keep a close eye on him. Some substances will cause hyperactivity in some pets and for the most part it goes away on its own. I'd watch for drooling, foaming at the mouth and, of course, any seizure like activity. Keep water available but make sure he doesn't drink too much as this can also cause serious problems.

Good luck.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Sep 22 6:56 pm


Dog Health > Dog ate it! Help!

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 5, '12 1:30pm PST 
Wow, you're really talented! I wish I could make stuff like that. I have no creative talent at all. I'm glad Luke didn't eat it while it was whole.

As everyone else have said I wouldn't worry too much about Luke and just keep an eye on him. I would also give him some wheat bread to coat his stomach because of the tooth picks and some canned pumpkin to help any possible diarrhea (it should be regular canned pumpkin, not pie filling). If he gets an upset stomach you can give him Tagamet (Cimetidine) 3 to 5mg/pound. You can give it as a precaution too since he is likely to get a belly ache. It's commonly given to dogs. You can use the regular OTC pills or ask your vet for a liquid version.


Good luck.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Feb 6 2:35 pm


Dog Health > Genital issues in older male dog. Worry or not?

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 5, '12 1:10pm PST 
This post is on the blunt side, just so you know in case you're on the prudish side.

My soon to be 10-year old dog Toshi has been having this new behavior the past six months or so and I don't know if it's anything to worry about or not.
About a year ago I switched the dogs' food to a senior version of their food and Toshi started to have symptoms that were most likely allergic symptoms. He started to eat grass a lot more and he started to lick his butt obsessively. The grass eating was taking care of by switching food but the butt licking continued, stopped and then came back. That has since been taken care of after finally finding a powder that worked so that's not an issue anymore. But while it was still going on he started doing a new thing that I refer to as "the humping dance" because that's exactly what it looks like. He would start wiggling his hips while walking around. I believed that it was because his butt was itchy. It didn't happen often, just a few times and for some reason mostly when he was getting really excited as I was coming home. He'd just do it for a few seconds.
After we finally had gotten the itchy butt treated, which took trying several things, the humping dance continued which I thought was surprising. That lead me to believe that it wasn't caused by the itchy butt after all. Then a few weeks ago I was drying him off with a towel when he started wiggling his hips and I noticed that his bulbus glandis was swollen and his penis was erected. Since then I've noticed that that's the case every time he does the humping dance.
He's been neutered since he was a puppy and has never been a humper. If this was something he'd always done I wouldn't worry too much but considering that it started at age 9 and during a time when he had other issues it does concern me. I explained it to the vet and she just said it's normal but I got the feeling that she didn't completely understand what I was saying. Why would a dog all of a sudden start getting erections at 9 years old? To me it seems like he's uncomfortable when he's doing the humping dance. Does anyone have any idea of what's causing this or is it just a normal thing? Does anyone have any ideas?
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 6 12:42 pm


Dog Health > Excessive drinking, thyroid problems

Toshi

1217600
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 15, '11 10:44am PST 
My 9 and a half year old Border Collie mix (we think) Toshi started drinking a lot of water about a week ago. It wasn't that noticeable at first, I was just refilling the water bowl more often than normal, but by the weekend it had become really noticeable and I realized it was Toshi who was doing the extra drinking and not my other dog or the cats.
Since this can be a sign of kidney failure or other scary things we went for blood work yesterday. The results came back today and everything is fine except for his thyroid. His level is 0.33 and the normal range is 1.2 -3.5. This was a T4 test. They are now doing another test, a TSH test, which I've never heard of.

Does anyone else have any experience with this? I would really appreciate any input or suggestions anyone may have. What kind of symptoms have your dogs with an underactive thyroid experienced and how has the treatment worked?
Is there anything, other than treating with medication, that I should do for Toshi, like giving supplements, changing diet, etc.? Are there any additional tests that were done on your dog? I trust my vet but I know from experience that they don't know everything and sometimes it helps to do some research yourself.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Nov 16 12:46 pm

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