Postings by Shiloh

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Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Action: Don't give dogs as Christmas gifts!
Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 12, '13 12:22am PST 
(Yes, a little late, but I won't tell if you don't smile )

I won't say that I DISagree with you, but I think that a dog can make a good Christmas gift if the adoption is well planned and properly thought out, especially since around Christmas is when dogs seem to be dumped in greater numbers and shelters strain to keep up.

The sad fact is ANY dog can be 'thrown away' at ANY time. I was the recipient of one such animal. The family got a cute puppy that turned into a high energy, nervous dog that was too much for them.

I would say that I agree with 'don't give a dog as an impulse gift'.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Dora, Jan 15 7:50 am

Behavior & Training > Sending a dog away for training? Bootcamp?
Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 4, '12 4:43pm PST 
Shiloh went to a boot camp. They spent $800 for a company to board him for a number of weeks and train him. Of course, they wanted him trained because he was a high energy, high prey drive dog who never got the stimulation he needed. He went to boot camp with all the problems a high energy/no outlet dog has and came back to them with all that and now the added issues of biting children and fear of adult men (possibly preexisting and exacerbated). Worth the $800!! The price tag also included training sessions with the family and an in-home consultation, I think.

From what I can gather, the training facility used dominance based philosophy, a huge no-no with Iggy mixes anyway shock

I took him a year ago and we've only had one issue with him ever: he likes to eat paper anything.

shrug What can you do?
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by MIKA&KAI, Jun 5 6:47 am


Behavior & Training > Leaving two dogs alone..yah or nah?

Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Fri May 4, '12 8:46pm PST 
You know your dogs best. Until we had Shrinking Shiloh and Dingo, leader of the Dog Gestapo in the same house, I 'd never even thought about separating dogs when I wasn't home. We'd been a multi-dog home my entire life and I'm not sure my family even knew what a crate was and the dogs were never separated and we never came home to injuries or dead dogs.

Now that Shiloh has settled in and everyone meshes well, we have 3 free roaming dogs again. Shiloh and Dingo both have incredible crate fear when we are out of sight, to the point of injuring themselves to get out. Locking them in a room is out, because Shiloh was accidentally closed into a room once and DESTROYED the carpet. We took the path of least resistance and it's working for us.

I don't want to discount the anguish people must have felt, coming home to finding their dogs injured or dead, but I think the situations described are being used to over-represent a relatively small risk to the average person. Like saying you shouldn't drive a car because you might get into a head-on collision and die. I'm an insurance worker and I see plenty of situations in which that happens but compared to the amount of people driving cars...

Now that I've expressed my potentially controversial opinion, I will also restate that everyone knows their own dogs best and should take all advice with their dog and general situation in mind. We don't have all the facts in every situation and any advice we give could make things worse so if you have any concerns about your dogs and their interactions you should contact a behaviorist that has a solid basis and good references.
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» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by Pooch ~ I miss you ~, May 8 2:06 am


Dog Health > breeding dogs with anxiety and stress

Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 16, '11 8:44pm PST 
From the puppies of Yoopie and Shiloh's litter I've been able to follow (6 out of 9), three took from their mother's dispositions, two turned out sweet as could be and one took after their father. Mother was/is a natural nervous wreck and father was/is at least partially nature-made (read: undersocialized) aggressive and nervous temperament.

Of the three that are natural-nervous, two were not socialized period, one was well socialized.

Of the two sweet-tempers, one was extremely well socialized for prepping as a therapy dog and the other lived in a multidog, large family setting with no public contact with other dogs/people.

The aggressive-nervous puppy lived in a large, loud family setting not suited to his temperament, was not publicly socialized and went through a dominance-based training program that only compounded the initial issues. I will call his nervous portion natural and the aggressive portion created.

I think that with any inherently nervous dog, there is the potential for passing on the temperament, dam or sire. From what I've gathered about Yoopie's litter, I would say there is a strong connection between a naturally occurring personality quirk in parent passing to puppy. Now as to if it because nature or nurture, that's another story.

I know that the few reputable breeding operations I've been into contact with will remove dogs with less than stable personalities from the bloodline, usually by placing them in pet homes.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ava & Nix, Dec 17 2:59 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > I said four was enough, but I am weak...

Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 4, '11 8:38pm PST 
Oh, Savvy... I would've taken them! laugh out loud

I'm so lucky that there haven't been any loose/left out dogs in my area lately. We already have two permies and a foster and two cats, but I'm such a bleeding heart. The husband is not quite so bleeding - he's more concerned with useless stuff, like the cost of feeding the animals the good stuff they eat ("You spend HOW MUCH on a bag of food for those mutts that ate my shoe??") and their vet bills and stuff and I'm like "But, look at that SMILE. He loves us already, I just know it! How can you leave him here??"

It probably wouldn't help my case any that Shiloh was accidentally closed in a bedroom the other day and ruin the carpet trying to get out, poor thing thinking A $300 repair bill is not something that makes Mr. Financials happy.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Winnie Mae, Oct 14 12:53 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Big Black Dog Syndrome
Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 4, '11 8:05pm PST 
You know, I think it has a lot to do with dark faces and dark eyes. Yoopie, even though he has just as much white on his body, has a lot on his face, and as he's grown older he's gotten some roaning on his face, giving it a lighter appearance. Shiloh on the other hand, had very little white on his face. People think Yoopie looks friendly, sweeter and approachable while I've been told Shiloh appears more off-putting and... they couldn't really describe it. The impression they got, at least just by looking at pictures of him, was that he was not a friendly dog. We as humans put a lot of stock on face readability and dark colored dogs (even dark brown) make it hard for us to read their faces.

So, if someone doesn't consider a dog approachable (cute, appealing, etc) they're not likely to check them out, take them out of the kennel or inquire about them so they never see the dog's personality, don't ever know if the dog is a good fit and so the dog sits.

For black cats: Sadly, some places won't adopt them out at certain times or even at all because of the potential abuse they may suffer. We adopted Chico and Ozzy on September 27th from our local city shelter. Both are solid black and were 3-4 months at the time. The animal control office who was there told us we were lucky; the city had a policy to not adopt out black cats in the month of October because people would get them from the shelter and torture them for Halloween.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Oct 6 4:24 am


Behavior & Training > Ethics...controlling one's dog

Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Tue Oct 4, '11 6:30pm PST 
My grandmother adopted a large, energetic, unruly puppy after her elderly Malamute Sasha went to the Rainbow Bridge.

Her name was Mya, she was a husky mix of some sort and there was NO WAY my grandmother could handle her. She spent all her time in a crate because she would destroy the house out of boredom. She was never walked because, after my grandpa passed, no one could keep a good enough grip on her as she dragged them down the street. She was mannerless, undersocialized and underexercised because when she hit 8 months, my grandmother lost the ability to physically control her and did not have the ability or skill to attempt to train her. And some times you HAVE to physically control a dog, for their safety and yours. Dingo is terrified of some things we can't avoid - parked cars, mailboxes - and is only scared every once in a while with no obvious trigger to the fear. He runs into the street, completely terrified. I have to check his escape and get him out of the road; my grandma couldn't do that and she doesn't have arthritis. He's only 70 lbs on a heavy day, but goodness, he can pull.

Mya needed more than my grandmother could provide; she needed lots of intense exercise and tons of mental activity to keep her stimulated and the exercise part at least could not be given to her by even my fairly active grandmother. She was surrendered to a rescue group and now has a loving, active home where she is a much calmer and happier dog.

Honestly, there needs to be more information here before we can say yes or no, especially given the circumstances. If this dog is like Yoopie - gentle, biddable, happy to camp on the couch all day - I'd say she should go for it. A calm dog, even a large one, makes an awesome companion and can give older people a sense of purpose that they may have previously been missing. If the dog is like Dingo - headstrong, sled-dog-in-former-life (loves to pull), less likely to obey commands, needs lots of attention and activity - I would say no. Despite all the training in the world, I think that the dog's person should be able to provide all the things a dog needs. Dog walkers and such are fine, but if you have a high-drive dog and you can't personally give at least some of the activity it needs, I think you are shorting both the dog and yourself. The quality of life for the dog would be less than it could be and that's not fair to the dog or the person. I know my grandma felt awful for what she was doing to Mya, because she realized that she was restricting the dog and not providing her with a home that was as good as it could be.
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Oscar, Oct 5 9:00 am


Behavior & Training > Bark Collars At The Dog Park??

Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Mon Oct 3, '11 5:18pm PST 
I guess we're lucky with our park. We took Dingo to the dog park for the first time just yesterday. After a little uncertainty on Dingo's part - which was quickly cleared up by me walking the park's perimeter with him and not putting any pressure on to socialize - it was nothing but pleasant. There were a million tennis balls, a couple people with Chuckits tossing them for any dog that ran up and all the dogs were very well behaved.

There were only a couple "ehhhh" moments in the 4 hours we were there taking advantage of the nice weather. First: There was a puppy, not more than 8 lbs, running around in the big dog enclosure. The woman also had a Weim, but the puppy was very small to be there. A girl brought her teacup Chi in too and the poor thing did not like all the big dogs coming up for a sniff. He snapped and snarled and she just laughed; I had to pick him up to keep him from freaking out. (He was sooo cute, I think if I didn't have 5 animals already, I'd look into fostering one cloud 9 ). Second, and not behavior related really, but it bothered me: There were a couple of shockingly obese dogs. One lab was so overweight that she wheezed constantly. From the moment she got out of the car until she left, she gasped and wheezed for breath. He owner's response? "Fat girls breathe hard." eek
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Scruffy (RIP), Oct 3 5:43 pm


Behavior & Training > Aggressive with Other Dogs while on the Leash

Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 2, '11 4:31pm PST 
Welcome to Dogster! Leash reactivity is a common problem for a lot of dogs. I'm hoping that Asher or another Dogster who is well versed in reactive dogs will hop in here and give some great advice!

Have you had the chance to socialize your new pup in a controlled, off-leash environment yet (and that way know if it's the leash or just dogs in general)?
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Dr. Watson, Oct 3 9:03 am

Behavior & Training > How Smart is Your Dog?
Shiloh

Throw the- Squeaky Bone. Do- It Now.
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 2, '11 4:25pm PST 
Toto, I've noticed dogs pick up very heavily on micro signals of body language. Mine, at least, know when they can get away with things because I'm not too into enforcing it and Dingo - who is the most likely to be on the end of a serious command - definitely knows when there will be no leeway and he is expected to obey.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Czarka, CGC UJJ, Oct 4 7:37 am

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