Postings by Happy

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Choosing the Right Dog > Protection Dogs
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 24, '15 4:38pm PST 
A dog that will naturally protect you is different than a dog that is trained to protect you. I always recommend the latter since the chances of a dog that will bite without training having good nerves and not being a liability are low to none.

As far as dogs that will protect you with training a lot depends on what your lifestyle is rather someone will recommend one breed over the other. Things like what kind of energy can you deal with, and what kind of coat care you can deal with make a huge difference with breeds that are recommended.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Sat 4:38 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Booties, A question and advice needed
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 4, '15 11:42am PST 
The sooner you start with boots the better. And introducing them positively will help with the future of wearing them in a positive and upbeat manner.

You might try the Pawz booties with Breezy... I doubt they'd rub, and while they're not attractive they are functional in all but the hottest weather.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Webster, Jan 9 11:50 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Booties, A question and advice needed

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jan 2, '15 7:14pm PST 
The help the most, I used Muttluk boots for Happy for years but never liked the way they turned on his foot. They didn't irritate his dew claws but they also didn't really provide any traction on slick floors or provide Enough hot weather protection in summer months.

I have heard good things about Neo Paws, they claim (and it does look like) that when wrapped properly the straps won't irritate dew claws. I have not tried them myself mostly because they come in what I feel are awful gaudy colors, and just look bulky but they may be worth trying with Breezy if you're really worried about rubbing.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Webster, Jan 9 11:50 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > How old is old enough for a mobility harness?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 31, '14 9:50pm PST 
I always teach dogs that are going to go into harness to loose lead walk/heel a bit ahead of traditional heel position. I like their shoulder even with my knee, this can take a bit of extra training to get the dog used to maintaining a relative position to your body. I find that teaching a dog to walk in a straight line is not only difficult for them to grasp but also takes a long time for them to get used to. Beyond that I also teach lateral movement, teaching a dog to pivot as I turn and to side step to keep close to me.

If you're going to teach momentum pull you can start teaching the dog to step out on command rather than wait for you. I also will teach a young dog to lean into pressure of a leash looped across the chest but I do very very little of this because I don't want to put pressure on a growing dog.

I teach my dog left/right. I Teach 'square' for the dog to square up and stand still as if stacked for show. I teach all my curb work, stopping at curbs, waiting to be released to step up or down. I teach stair work, stopping at each step and waiting for a release.

I honestly teach All of my harness skills before a dog every goes into harness. The harness is only added as the last step layered over all the skills they already have.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Dec 31 9:50 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Booties, A question and advice needed

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 31, '14 9:42pm PST 
The ruffwear are good boots but they Can rub at dewclaws. Loki wears his with socks and that fixes most of the problem. The other both they make doesn't rub as bad but doesn't stay on as well so it's a toss up for me.

As for bootwork I recommend starting early. If you're starting with a puppy the Pawz disposable reusable booties are great for getting a dog used to boots without having to invest in a full set of boots for a puppy that will quickly outgrow them.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Webster, Jan 9 11:50 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Some confusion over rights of ESA vs SD
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 20, '14 6:48pm PST 
There was never any protection granted to ESA's, service dogs have always been required to be trained in task or work relating to their handler's disabilities. The revisions that went into effect in 2010 just clarified where there had been some confusion and tightened up the loophole that had people dragging all sorts of exotic animals into public as service animals.

There is no required vest color stated anywhere on the ADA's website, and red or blue vest makes no matter, actually purple, green or pink poka dot doesn't change what rights the handler has to have their dog with them in public.

There are psychiatric service dogs that are trained to assist veterans with PTSD or other psychiatric conditions and as long as they are task trained they're service dogs.

The term emotional support animal is not even mentioned in the ADA, it is mentioned in the ACAA and simply denotes a pet belonging to a person with a psychiatric disability. An animal with no specific training or status, which is allowed under the ACAA to sometimes (with specific requirements) fly with their disabled handler. The FHA outlines allowances for the elderly and persons with psychiatric disabilities to have a pet in no pet housing, but unless I'm wrong they don't actually call them emotional support animals.

I highly recommend that you check out the ADA's Business Brief (which is outdated but still has good information) and the ADA's new revisions from 2010.

Right now your information is dangerously incorrect. If you have any questions there is a Q&A sheet or feel free to call the DOJ as they are always good at answering questions on the legal rights of business's and the law.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Dec 20 6:48 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Veterinarian for SD

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 27, '14 2:48am PST 
As for the subject of rubbing there are two things you can try that might help. First vet wrap around the pastern can sometimes keep the boots from rubbing. Second you might look at neo paws. I've seen many people have less issue with those than with other brands.

Beyond that there are companies that make support wraps, and I haven't seen them cause any rubs and will help support a mobility dog's pastern. (Link)
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Harley, SD, CGC, TDI, Dec 17 3:53 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > How old is old enough for a mobility harness?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 27, '14 2:30am PST 
A dog needs to be a minimum of 24 months old with appropriate x-rays for hips and elbows along with an evaluation by an orthopedic vet before fitted with a mobility harness. Training for position and cues without any weight bearing can be done before that time.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Happy, Dec 31 9:50 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > First Service Dog

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 1, '14 8:42pm PST 
99% of guide dog schools are free. I don't recommend (and most programs won't allow) you to buy your own dog for them to train. It has taken decades to get the bloodlines correct that will regularly produce a working guide dog and schools are understandingly careful about which dogs they match with which handler.

On the subject of wanting a dog now so the dog can get used to your mother before she goes completely blind that actually can be counterproductive it's hard if not impossible for a partially sighted handler to properly work with a guide dog. You have to completely trust your dog in order to have a successful partnership with a service dog, and when you're trying to second guess the dog it doesn't work as well. Beyond that you have to learn orientation and other navigation skills before having a guide dog would be useful.

For the best information on a guide dog it's ideal to speak to a guide dog school. There are a large number of schools across the country that would be very willing to help you out.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Nov 1 8:42 pm

Grooming > Recommend a everyday brush?
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 23, '14 9:14pm PST 
Actually for a short double coated dog like you have a rubber curry is one of the better options. It also doubles as a scrub brush when you wash your dog allowing you to get a better clean. Slicker's run the same risk as a furmanator of scratching and irritating the skin. For shedding season, depending on the length of coat you might look into either a rake or a mars coat king, which while designed for terrier coats work well for getting out undercoat safely
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Vance CGC, Dec 15 8:14 pm

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