Postings by Happy

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Service & Therapy Dogs > Housing Issues in Illinois Regarding my SDiT - Any Help Appreciated.
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 27, '15 3:15am PST 
You may want to run this by the Pro-Boneo group on facebook, there are a lot of law experts there that likely would know better how to answer this question and get you the help you need. Sorry I can't be more help but housing law isn't really my specialty.

Cheers and good luck.

Happy and family.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Mon 3:15 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > Few quick questions about flyers and vests
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 27, '15 3:11am PST 
Dog capes. com is where I get all of mine.

They're fantastic sturdy quality and look professional to boot.

For patches I swear by Creative Clam though they aren't as cheap as some places.

As for flyers as of the new update I've printed out the ADA's question and answer sheet and offer to let business's copy it for their reference. They've done a fantastic job in clearing up both protections for service dog handlers as well as protections for business's. (Plus they cleared up all those pesky etiquette questions like do we have to let dogs in seats in restaurants or in carts in grocery stores)
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sam, Mon 2:44 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > I have a 12 yr old Border Collie. My MD wrote a note for me, says he was necessary.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 17, '15 4:03pm PST 
Tell that to a slew of legitimate programs that provide DAD's. Ideally no one will have just one task but legally yes Alerting is a defensible only task. It's harder to prove but there are a number of handlers who have proved it in a court of law.

There are many situations where alerting will mitigate the danger's of a disability. Seizure detection, Diabetic alert, Migraine detection. Giving a handler enough time to make themselves safe or correct a problem is very much mitigating a disability's effect.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Jul 17 4:03 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > GSD right for me?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 17, '15 4:22am PST 
Sounds like a GSD might be a good fit for your needs, but it would need to be the right GSD. Working line dogs can be a Lot of dog (I have two, one is my current SD and one is my SD prospect)

My best recommendation is to take your trainer with you to evaluate the prospect. Make sure whoever you're training with is familar with shepherds as there are some breed specific issues that can crop up in working or show line dogs that may need special attention.

I don't know what you need a service dog for but I'll give you a little bit of my experience working with the breed, and with service dog's in general.

Shepherds can make wonderful guide dogs, they're assertive and self assured (when raised and trained correctly) and capable of independent thought. They can make reasonably decent mobility dogs (both traditional and balance/brace dogs) but will tend to question orders more than your more traditional breeds (goldens/labs/poodles). If you are a handler who can stay on top of that, great they'll work well for you.

Shepherds make naturally good medical alert dogs BUT, and this is a big but they can run the risk of being over protective. If you ever feel that you'll be down and unresponsive, unable to handle the dog you need to address this with the breeder as well as with your trainer and evaluate what will happen long before this becomes an issue.

Because of the above issue shepherds rarely make good psych dogs, they tend to become too emotionally dependent on their handler, and can at times feed into handlers fears and anxieties. This can cause the dog to develop anxieties of their own, protective issues as well as just general difficulties handling.

With the right dog handler pair they can make psych dogs but it is generally not a breed I recommend for the work. Especially when dealing with PTSD, or anxiety based issues the last thing a handler needs is a dog that the public is going to naturally fear. They need a dog that puts the public at ease or attracts friendly curiosity.

Ultimately it will depend on the particular dog and that's something best decided with hands on the dog and a proper evaluation.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Annie Bannanie, Jul 17 8:13 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > I have a 12 yr old Border Collie. My MD wrote a note for me, says he was necessary.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 17, '15 4:11am PST 
Alerting Can be a legitimate task. There are hundreds of seizure alert dogs, diabetic alert dogs, and even dogs that alert to panic attacks. The clincher is training though. You can take a dog that naturally alerts to medical conditions and shape that alert and track that alert. I generally require 6 months of legitimate tracking to sign off on alerting as a trained task.

That said if you have a dog that alerts you can do more for yourself to train response behaviors as well.

A lot of dogs trained for psychiatric work can be trained for interruption style alerting, someone who has bad panic attacks, or anxiety attacks often will perform unconscious behaviors prior to said attack. With time and help a handler can track these behaviors and through faking them shape an alerting behavior so the handler can interrupt the pattern leading to a panic attack.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Happy, Jul 17 4:03 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Some confusion over rights of ESA vs SD
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 12, '15 10:37pm PST 
The difference between ESA vs SD stims from is they dog trained to do a task or work related to the disability.

Tasks would be specifically cued behaviors for the handler to help mitigate the handler's disabilities where as work is trained behaviors that are trained as 'auto' behaviors.

Anything that is alone the vein of 'it makes me feel better' or 'comforts me is emotional support and not task work. "Natural" alerts things like 'he cuddles with me when I don't feel better" doesn't fall under the course of tasks because they are not Trained.

When training dogs for myself or clients I require 80 logged hours of regular obedience training, 120 logged hours of public access specific training, and 120 logged hours of task specific training as well as a dog being able to pass my PAT as well as having passed a CGC and have at least one leg on either an AKC CD or RN title. This is obviously not required under the ADA but it is a good idea for yourself and your dog. Not to mention that under the ADA a dog Does need to remain under control and be specifically task trained.

Hope that helps a little.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sabi, Jul 13 12:17 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > I have a 12 yr old Border Collie. My MD wrote a note for me, says he was necessary.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 12, '15 10:29pm PST 
Service dog training requires a dog to be trained to perform task or work for a disabled handler. Generally speaking when we are talking about purely alert work it is better to have response work in place as well for legal purposes as I have seen a number of handlers lose court cases when trying to prove that their dog alerts (DAD's being an exception since the training for them is scent work based and can be tracked and logged as with other alert work)

On the subject of border collies as service dogs while they are very smart and very easily trained as a former breeder and current owner and trainer I caution people that they do not usually make the best service dog candidates.

The breed is prone to be sound sensitive and a bit on the reactive side and unless breed for a more forgiving temperament they can be less than tolerant of the public.

If you are in love with the breed I caution you to please rethink breeding unless you are working with an experienced breeder. Breeding is a complicated subject and without the help of someone experienced. Instead it is ideal to find a breeder you trust who breeds the kind of dog you are looking for and return to them for additional puppies.

Breeding is hard, heartbreaking work that can run very expensive when you take into consideration the health testing required to insure a healthy litter, titling to prove the parent's worth, vet care for sire and dam as well as vet care for a growing litter of puppies.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Happy, Jul 17 4:03 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > How to train a dog to ignore others

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 12, '15 10:20pm PST 
You might look into Control unleashed. Their Look at that game is great for teaching a dog that you are more rewarding than their environment. While Control Unleashed is written specifically for reactive dogs in mind it is a great general guide for getting more attention out of your dog and making your dog more comfortable and more aware of you as their handler.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Jul 12 10:20 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Question about "fake" SD's

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 4, '15 4:32pm PST 
I've handled service dogs for a really long time, and done my good share of traveling and I'm not convinced that the 'faker problem' is as much of a problem as big programs *cough cough CCI* and the media makes it out to be.

That said the easiest solution is for business's to educate themselves on when they can ask a disruptive team to leave. If they were educated and removed teams that were out of control or not housebroken then no matter if they are a real service dog or not it would solve the issue.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Domino, Apr 14 9:53 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > Just a few questions
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 4, '15 4:27pm PST 
Take this for what it's worth but my experience with Petco and any of the other big box store trainers is that they rarely are worth going all the way through CGC with. There are no training standards and their actually Training is not very extensive nor kept up to date.

There is a Lot of information online on training, some of it good some of it bad. By all means you should talk to that trainer and see what your impression is and ask for references and to meet dogs that she's trained. Might help, might not.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Domino, Apr 4 6:37 pm

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