Postings by Pixie Bell

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Choosing the Right Dog > You shouldn't get a _____ if ______.
Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 13, '13 7:27pm PST 
Here's one!

You shouldn't get a rat terrier if:

-You can't deal with a dog touching you EVERY SECOND (unless you are ready to play).
-You don't feel like playing even after both you and the dog are well past exhausted.
-You can't resist giving table food (yours) to the dog (fatty, fatty!)
-You don't like a dog that likes you, only you, you alone, no one else (well, everyone else MIGHT be tolerable).
-You don't like a small dog with a big attitude
-You don't feel like playing anymore, never say die!
-You aren't willing to be CONSISTANT with training.
-You aren't willing to find what they want to work for (Ball? Toy? Heck, screw training! Lets go PLAY!).
-You don't like a dog sleeping under your covers.
-You don't like a dog that sleeps between your legs.
-You don't like a dog that wants to play. All the time.
-You don't like a dog that is territorial.
-You don't like a dog that doesn't share her toys.
-You got tired reading the first play comment.
-You can't at least throw a ball for a half hour in the evenings (and then on and off for the next few hours through the house).
-Did I mention that you need to enjoy playing?
-If this entire post has worn you out, you should quit and never consider getting a rat terrier.
-If you're still reading, there may be hope for you.
-If you don't like kisses.
-If you don't like to be bugged for love...or play time.
-If you aren't willing to be completely enamored by a small pup with outrageous energy who, when she is finally exhaused, only wants to snuggle away the rest of the evening. Well, maybe until you take her to potty. Then you may need to toss the ball just a couple more times before bed.
-If you physically don't mind removing the ball from her line of sight before bed.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Arya, Jul 7 9:29 am

Dog Health > Pixie broke half her dewclaw, it's hurting her... Help?
Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 3, '12 7:43pm PST 
Here is an image of the broken nail. The blood is all gone from the broken piece.

You'll have to copy paste it. I couldn't get the Dogster Forum Helper to come up on my iPhone... It usually works, but this update seems to have some bugs. confused

http://i1121.photobucket.com/albums/l510/DaynaKH/A1BAA29C-DA8 4-4EF1-8A67-1FBAECAF47F8-374-000000158E38ADD9.jpg
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Dec 4 9:04 pm


Dog Health > Pixie broke half her dewclaw, it's hurting her... Help?

Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 3, '12 5:55pm PST 
Pixie went for a run today and in the process must have caught her dewclaw somewhere. It broke off her nail above the quick, and bled quite a bit. I debated at first whether I should clip the nail at the break, but it's very close to her pad and it's still attached, though definitely broken (it's not at an odd angle).

It isn't off enough to have severed the quick, so I'm not sure if I should clip it and clean it, or leave it be and let it heal on its own. It bothers her if I touch it, and she is sitting here licking it.

Help, please?
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Dec 4 9:04 pm


Other Barks & Woofs > Finish the sentence.

Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 5:33pm PST 
...THROW THE BALL!
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» There has since been 20 posts. Last posting by Darcy, Aug 31 8:47 am


Behavior & Training > Do you ever watch your dog work?

Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 21, '12 6:24pm PST 
I don't think we have any local nose work classes--or all three of my pups would probably be involved.

I've never timed her, but she's never lost a tennis ball either. It is sooooo cool to watch her locate the ball through our little game. She will methodically pace the entire yard until she finds it. Today I somehow tossed it over the chicken coup and into a large mound of seriously neglected grass (that's like, 6 foot tall) and it took her about five minutes of steady searching to find it. I love teaching her look for it. You see things click. Like today, she knew it went over the coup despite not being able to see it. She stood right where it flew over and sniffed the air, then continued her methodical path around the yard in that area.

It really was just super cool. She does this all the time, too.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Grunt CGC, Aug 26 7:10 pm

Behavior & Training > Do you ever watch your dog work?
Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 21, '12 5:06pm PST 
By "work" I'm talking about their natural given inclination and skills in any area.

My inspiration for this post comes from Pixie, who is ball obsessed. She looooooves fetch, but my arm gets tired. When I get worn out, I often "trick" her. I'll pretend to toss the ball in one direction, but actually toss it in another. She then scales the backyard for as long as it takes to locate the ball.

I must be honest and tell you that it lands in some pretty crazy places. And she always finds it. And it's really awesome to watch her work.
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by Grunt CGC, Aug 26 7:10 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Finding the right small dog for a couple

Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 20, '12 5:01am PST 
In our area the local rescues often have young (not puppies) Boston terriers available. Happy-go-lucky little guys who were given up by "breeders going out of business."

Truthfully, if your willing to go the rescue route you can bring home a young dog who's temperament is more distinguishable, athletic ability is more distinguishable, and they are more ready to play.

The downside to Boston Terriers is that I rarely meet one without health problems--which can get costly in the long run.

Another breed to consider is the rat terrier. I throw this out with caution, but you mentioned long walks and hikes and I can't think of a better companion than our very own Pixie when we do those activities. She is playful, hardy, a-freakin-dorable, and loves kids. She is also super Velcro to me, seconded by Jake, and aloof with many others (as is the normal Ratty response). This breed is generally healthy, highly trainable, energetic (but it's tempered, less spastic than the Boston) and easy to find in your price range. There are many of them that need homes because their energy levels are higher than owners can deal with.

In my experience, though, a long walk makes all the difference in the world. When we get home she is as happy to sit in my lap with a chew and slip under the covers for bedtime as any small adorable dog.

You can also choose your color and size. They come in toy, mini, and standard and have some cool colors like lemon, peach, the usual bi, and my girl--a tri.

The one warning I have is to socialize well. Our ratty has been through agility training (and LOVES it, she GETS it) and therefor isn't super barky. They are naturally aloof with strangers, so be sure and socialize, socialize, socialize.

smile HTH!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Pixie Bell, Aug 20 5:01 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Potential New Dog Breeds

Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 19, '12 4:19pm PST 
Obviously, the best answer to your question includes (get ready for it) a standard sized rat terrier! big laugh

But really, check out the hunting lines. They have to be good in group settings because they would usually hunt with others--though with a different goal in mind. They're quite independent of the pack... Added bonus, they LOVE and I mean LOOOOVE their humans. Velcro to boot.

I would check into the lines. Pixie, for instance, was bred as a squirrel dog and sucks that up totally--but by GOD she will fetch that ball! Zip on prey drive. Of course that's the exception not the rule...

The standard sized ones (betcha didn't know they come in three sizes!) are in your size range. They can be in the 30#ish range.

As for training, they're one of the easier terriers to train.In my experience, they're soft dogs. Wary of even a minor vocal change. Definitely socialize early on as they are naturally wary of strangers.

They are a bit hyper, though. Be ready for energy galore!
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by Brittany, Aug 21 11:46 pm


Behavior & Training > Silly/Embarassing Things I Do With My Dog(s)

Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Sat Aug 18, '12 8:54pm PST 
Oh! Forgot to add that Pixie and I have a "Love Fest" what I call her insatiable desire to lick my face--and I let her and say, "WEEE!!!! IT'S A LIVE FEST! ILIVEYOUTOOILOVEYOUTOOILOVEYIUTOO!!! LOVE FEST!!!!"

^embarassing. confused
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Kashmir ♥ CGC, Aug 19 5:54 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > Let's Talk Terriers
Pixie Bell

Is that a ball?
 
 
Barked: Sat Jun 30, '12 12:31pm PST 
Agreeing with Buster on training.

Frankly, I think they're far more trainable than most websites give them credit for. I mean, Pixie doesn't know the difference between play time and training time, they're so intertwined! She will do ANYTHING if I'll just throw that stupid ball. And in all honesty, I've never seen her turn down a "sit" in return for a cookie either...

I have an ACD mix, and I HATE training her. I find my terrier much more focused. Use that play drive to train with anD you'll have great success.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Jul 1 11:51 am

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