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Behavior & Training > Maybe we aren't the right home for her :-(
Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Mon Feb 4, '13 10:23pm PST 
To be honest you may not be the people for her, but you need to think if you're really ready to open your home to any dog right now. Your schedules sound rough and cats are normally more independent than a dog. I never had a dog while I was working as my job as a scientist required many hours, could be very irregular and left me worn out often. I took my neighbor's dog who was an old dog with health problems, and she and I took more than two weeks to figure out our roles and that was with me being home most of the day. Well, we were a great match, but I found out her calmness and good manners were more from her health problems even though she had a great personality. She had to be euthanized in a little over a year due to cancer, heart, etc., which left me really wanting another dog. My next choice was a puppy, which really makes you question your decision, but we made it through puppyhood and she is now a wonderful dog and pal. But it did not happen on it's own. It took a lot of time and patience (which sometimes failed me) and teaching, but it was so worth it. I had to learn to never step back without looking because my pal follows me everywhere. I had to learn to go outside on very cold or rainy nights and not get impatient while we found the perfect spot, but, again, it was worth it. Hopefully I will have my bud for many years. But, if you take this dog back, be honest about your job demands and that it maybe wasn't really the best choice at this time in your life, so as to not impact her ability for another adoption. At an adoption event you can get too exited and not weigh the demands on bringing a dog into your home and life.
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» There has since been 62 posts. Last posting by , Feb 19 10:42 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Just adopted a young dog need some help...
Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 12, '12 11:02am PST 
She may be a lost dog or may be a dumped dog. Either way she may have been chased off from other places. She's pretty small and may have been constantly on guard to protect herself and is just exhausted. It might be helpful to get her a crate (can just be a cheap WalMart crate until you see if someone claims her, add bedding and make her a safe place she likes and feels secure it. You can put little treats in it and leave the door open and not push her staying in it until she is ok with it. I think she's just really stressed and will quickly see you as a safe and caring person and settle down. She's probably really missing someone and will fill that void with you with time.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Oct 12 12:08 pm


Senior Dogs > advice sought for adding doggie stept to our bed

Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 12, '12 10:52am PST 
I made steps for Sara while she was still a puppy. I'll add a picture when I get back to the house. I measured the bed height and made three steps out of half inch plywood and 1 by 6 pine (plywood for risers and pine for steps. I went to WalMart and got a carpet runner for less than $10 and stapled it to the steps. It took less than 5 minutes to teach her to use the steps (treats are wonderful training tools). She's used the steps ever since. I was afraid years of jumping wouldn't be good on her hips and knees so just started her out with steps. However, a friend brought her golden over and after following Sara a couple of times it easily went up and down the steps on it's own, and this dog is probably 4-5 years old. I'll add a photo tonight.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Oct 25 7:19 am


Behavior & Training > Please help the novice: Reactivity and more

Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Sun Sep 16, '12 8:54pm PST 
Don't give up too soon. Everyone always expects our dogs to be everything we want from the beginning, but that's not the reality of it. I got Sara at 9 weeks; took her to puppy training and the whole works. I was ready to send her back to the breeder because I couldn't believe what a wild terror she was, but I'm so glad I toughed it out. She's now 2 1/2 and a girl I really love. She loves kids, people, and other dogs, but is still too excited when she meets kids at the park. Most are good kids and ask if they can pet her. I make them wait until I've got a good grip on her collar and have them come up slowly and pet her. She just loves it, but she needs a little more age to be calmer (sounds funny, but Golden owners, of which Sara is half, warn me they're puppies a long time). If she had kids at home she'd already be calmer. My sister has a six month old Great Pyrenees female, and she already plays well with her grandchildren, ages 2 to 12 years of age, but still thinks it's funny if she can broadside my sister and knock her down. We still have some issues on the leash. She will pull hard when we first start walking unless I've played her down before we walk. She is a high energy dog which can take some getting used to. She used to almost pull my shoulder out of the socket if she saw a squirrel, but I learned to grab the leash with both hands and tell her "Don't you do it; I won't walk with you. I'd stop dead still and not move until she settled down. Now a squirrel can walk almost in front of her and she makes no effort to chase it, just watches it intently and wants to check the tree it went up. With your new dog, just start with it's command training: sit, lay down, stay, leave it, and come. Sara responded well to treats (I get the liver flavored training treats (not freeze dried) at Petsmart. If Sara hears a car near when we're walking, she goes into the grass and sits. It seems weird at first, but when your dog gets a command right really make over her, with claps and yeahs. It really works. Check out dog training videos on YouTube also. I've chosen one that Sara and I are working on to help with her and me with walking (yes, I needed training also). It takes time and effort, but when that dog loves everything about you and your family it will be worth it.
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by , Sep 24 1:02 pm


Grooming > Shaving to keep them cool?

Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 6, '12 9:34pm PST 
Sara gets a shorter cut in the summer but not a shave. She's trimmed one setting shorter than her winter cut, and her groomer carefully trims the hair short under her ears as she's in the water a lot and that seems to help us avoid ear problems. She also trims her leg wings a lot shorter and doesn't leave her tail as full. That helps me a lot when drying her after pool swims, and keeping cockle burrs out of her coat. But never a shave-Sara's a white dog and shaved down would make her much more susceptable to sun burns and skin cancers. When Sara's outside, she finds shade, fixes her a cool spot and has access to water with ice cubes, all of which seems to keep her cool. If it's really hot she has access to a pool which she seems to use to keep her cool. The only dog I had shaved was due to horrible matting caused by neglect, and I kept her out of the sun until her hair grew back in.
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» There has since been 30 posts. Last posting by , Jul 30 5:34 am

Get Well Soon > It's Tank again. :(
Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Tue May 29, '12 10:38pm PST 
Start him out with a small, submissive dog (small being his size or smaller); watch them carefully and don't let the other dog crowd into his space. Sometimes a dog that shows no interest in him starts to settle things down. Once he's ok with the first dog, gradually introduce him to other laid back, carefully chosen dogs. Try to never let him around big dogs again unless they're really a laid back breed like a older lab or golden (some dog parks are now separating areas into big and small dog areas). My niece's 10 pound dog was grabbed by the back and shaken hard like a rabbit by a bigger dog; luckily she got to him and rescued him, and he was sore and scared, but no broken back or bites. He still sometimes is scared if he sees a bigger dog he doesn't feel safe with. I think that's just a smart survivor response. My Sara is about 55 pounds, but I still am very protective of her with aggressive and bigger dogs as Sara is a very submissive non fighter. One neighbor's dog has been getting through an electric fence, and I got a prod that will give a pretty good shock (tried it on myself, not pleasant). One go at Sara, one shock by me, and the dog totally leaves her (and me) alone. Didn't do him any permanent damage, and he absolutely will have nothing to do with Sara. He still goes after other people's dogs while they're on leash, but won't come near us.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Jun 3 2:23 am


Puppy Place > Biting?

Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Tue May 29, '12 10:10pm PST 
Sara was a real biter as a puppy. I finally wound up yelling "Ow" really loud, telling her strongly "that hurt", turning my back on her, and telling her "I won't play with you anymore". She would try to circle me to get my attention, and I would keep turning away from her. I'd then sit down and refuse her any attention. She would eventually lay down and look dolefully at me. Then I'd say "OK, now we can play". When she got too wound up again, I went through the same routine. Sara's biting was all fun to her, but those puppy teeth really hurt. To this day, if Sara's being too rough, I say the same thing, and she stops and checks me and quits. She doesn't know what all the words mean, but she understands the important words and my tone. When she calms down, I aways tell her what a wonderful dog she is and play a little longer to reinforce her good behavior.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jul 16 4:47 pm


Dogs and a Clean Home > Whats a good type of blanket for dogs who rip things up?

Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Mon May 14, '12 9:12pm PST 
Some dogs are just chewers, no matter the age. Sara is now approaching 2 and a half and still has to be watched with towels which she loves to chew pieces from. I watch her closely and take things from her. She has also only now stopped chewing the heads off her toys. I worry because large amounts can clog a dog's intestine, but just getting older seems to have really helped my chewer. If only small bits of blanket like a corner is getting chewed up it probably won't hurt, but if your female is really chewing things up it won't hurt to wait on putting a blanket in her crate; most cloth doesn't show up on x-ray and having paid for a barium study to rule out intestinal obstruction is unbelievably pricey, I opted for not allowing her access to cloth, stuffed toys and similar items without supervision and she has gotten better with age. Sara is a hunting dog mix, and I've wondered if this ripping and shredding activity is worse in hunting and work mixes.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Jul 25 12:32 am


Grooming > I went to a new groomer and she recommended a grooming schedule

Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 22, '12 9:11pm PST 
Sara's hair grows really quickly so she gets a bath weekly since there's nothing she likes better than rolling in wet mulch, grass, earthworms, and such. We use a hypoallergenic shampoo and conditioner as she also seems like she may develop grass allergies as she got red eyes and itchy ears without an ear infection which went away on antihistamines (hopefully no allergy shots in her future). The weekly bath keeps pollen off her hair also. Every other week she gets a touchup along with the bath by her groomer. This is just trimming her ears, around her fannie, and her feet as she gets very hairy paw pads and starts to slide when she runs. Every 4th or 5th week she gets a full groom, a longer setting in winter and one setting less for summer as she has that hairy double coat, gets hot in Missouri summers and loves to be in water. I check her skin and the groomer checks her skin. There's never been any sign of dryness and her coat is soft and silky. She sleeps with me so her groomer and I worked out a schedule to keep her clean. This grooming schedule really cuts down on her leaving hair everywhere. I brush Sara almost daily, even if it's not a really thorough brushing to help keep her coat looking good with her rolling around in the yard. Of course, Sara doesn't have that potential to mat badly like some dogs do which is another difference. She just likes to share hairs with me.
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by , Apr 11 9:45 pm

Behavior & Training > She tries to EAT everything!!
Sara

Live life to the- fullest
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 7, '12 3:43pm PST 
I trained Sara with the command "Leave it" using small treats in the house and tons of praise when she would leave the treats. It is an important command since you can use it for a dropped pill, a paper clip or anything. I started by teaching her sit, and lay down. Use a treat that your pup only gets during training and make it exciting. Sara is 2 now and we still practice with treats. She will leave a treat beside her or across the room until I release her with the work OK. She also knows "drop it" which is good if she has something in her mouth. Just remember, your training periods have to be short to keep them from losing interest.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Mar 8 7:07 am

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