Postings by Gigi (dearly loved)

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Saying Goodbye: Memorials & Support > if you would like wings

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 11, '12 4:08pm PST 
The last time I needed this done didn't there use to be the A-Team forum or something like that? Anyway, we lost Gigi yesterday. Could someone please take one of her pictures that's suitable and give her her wings, she deserves them.

TIA

http://www.dogster.com/dogs/1080333
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» There has since been 256 posts. Last posting by ALF , Nov 1 12:31 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Great Job Lowe's!!
Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 10, '10 8:12pm PST 
Yeah, we saw that episode a couple months ago. Victoria did an outstanding job getting them straightened out and of course Lowes was wonderful for putting all that time and money into fixing the place up.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Mattie, Aug 14 9:06 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Curious--What Does Your Rescue Group Provide to its Fosters?

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 21, '10 3:33am PST 
"Never fostered before but I wouldn't expect the rescue to provide anything but the dog. "

That's putting a heavy burden on the foster family who doesn't get any of the adoption fee. My foster Gigi has almost monthly Vet visits. No way could I afford doing this if I had to pay all the Vet bills.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Goodman, Jun 23 3:24 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Am I wrong?

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 16, '10 7:30pm PST 
I've been contacted three times by people on this website who showed interest in adopting Gigi. Two wanted to meet her in person. Since both lived about an hour from me I suggested they fill out an adoption request first to make sure they qualify. I figured why waste all that time if the rescue won't OK them for adoption. Afterwards, I haven't heard back from any of them. I sent a follow up email to one and didn't get a response. Am I being unreasonable for making that request? Or maybe once they see how much the rescue charges, they change their minds?
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Bo, Mar 19 8:45 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Some Foster Questions

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 2, '10 7:29pm PST 
I wish this website would notify me of replies.....

"I have separate rules for fosters versus pets. I don't let fosters on the bed. I keep them crated at night. It doesn't seem to cause an issue. I don't think the dogs are terribly concerned with the difference in rules. "

I can't find the website now but there was a story called "what's fair is fair". It showed how a Border Collie refused to do a trick once he saw the other dog get a treat and he didn't for doing the same trick. I ran into that situation with my foster Sparks. He is a very rambunctious, somewhat dominate 3 year old. I wanted to improve his behavior and not have him pick up some bad habits from mine. When it's time to go out and play I'm not very strict in making the dogs sit while I open the front door. I wanted Sparks to sit before letting him out so he doesn't knock people over. So I put him on leash and opened the door, my two zoomed out. I told Sparks to 'sit', he refused. It had to be the same sort of thing since I normally never had a problem getting him to 'sit'. He saw he was being treated differently and refused to cooperate. I couldn't just let him win so I took him into the other room for a short timeout before letting him out. So you might have to watch what types of things you are going to do differently for your fosters. They might pick up on it and protest.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Sachi (1997-2012), Mar 8 1:50 am

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Some Foster Questions
Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 23, '10 9:09pm PST 
The fencing depends on the rescue and the dog. We own land in a wooded area and are surrounded by farmland. I don't have a fenced yard but my rescue lets us foster older dogs or ones that are not a flight risk. I know we can handle younger more energetic dogs, but they won't let us because of no fence. Reading some of the requirements some rescues have, I'm not sure if they will give you credit for having that type of fence, you'll just have to ask. You need to tell them your whole situation, they should then evaluate any rescues that come in to see if it would be a fit for your home. If they don't know enough about the dog and you get him, then you need to find out quick if he will fit in with your family. That is part of your job, to evaluate the dog so that it goes to a proper home. Some come in with issues, you should spend time trying to help the dog get over those issues. You might have to train them, but a lot of love and attention goes a long way to helping them out.

I can't say for certain how other rescues operate. With mine, our rescue gets a discount at a certain Vet so we have to take our fosters there. In an emergency we could take them to someplace closer, but we would try to contact our director first. All Vet visits should be approved first. Our rescue pays for the Vet and any meds the dogs need including heartworm and flea & tick preventitive. We pay for any gas, food, grooming, or other such things that they may require. It's all tax deductable if you itemize.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Sachi (1997-2012), Mar 8 1:50 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Name suggestions for a foster?

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 19, '10 2:40pm PST 
I like Hope big grin
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Opie CGC, Jan 19 6:10 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > What do you think is the best thing to do with a dog needing a new home?

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 19, '10 2:39pm PST 
Around me we have several 'no kill' shelters. If you turn one into a shelter, make sure it's 'no kill'. If the dog appears to be a pedigree, try to find a rescue that takes in that breed.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Jan 20 1:49 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > "I hate rescues"

Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 19, '10 2:36pm PST 
.....With some I also had to sign paperwork stating how often I would take her on walks and what kind of food I would feed her - Another big thing was needing vet references. I have no vet references so I can't get a dog....

Hey Bailee.

Yes some of the questions are intrusive, but don't think that if you don't answer each one the way you expect that that would automatically disqualify you from being accepted. If you don't have a Vet reference, that in itself is not going to disqualify you. You don't have to feed top quailty food, but they don't want the dogs to eat junk either. My one foster came in 20 lbs overweight. His owner fed him regular human food. His last meal with this owner was pancakes. The questions are meant to weed out the worst cases. They aren't used to find any little thing to reject a prospective adopter. There are some things they are strict about and other things that they may let slide if they consider the whole picture. If you go with a reputable rescue they aren't going to be looking over your shoulder to make sure you are following the letter of the contract. Don't feel insulted if you think they are asking too much of adopters. Many have the same provisions in their contracts so something must have happened in the past that made them put these provisions in there.
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» There has since been 67 posts. Last posting by , Jun 17 11:39 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > "I hate rescues"
Gigi (dearly- loved)

Runnin' wild and- pain free at the- Bridge
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 18, '10 6:36pm PST 
I've fostered seven Shelties so far and even I think they can be too strict sometimes. I live out in the country surrounded by woods and farmland. When I moved out here my two that I raised from pups were 5 and 6 years old. I don't have a fence and I never had a problem with them running off. But even with fostering, the rescues won't let me adopt or foster a young dog. I adopted Shadow after fostering him for two day. He was 9 or 10 years old when I got him and I'm glad the director didn't know how playful he was or she most likely wouldn't have let me foster or adopt him. When she saw a video of him playing, it sounded like she was worried about letting him go to us without a fence. But they did let us foster a much younger Sheltie (Sparks) that no one else wanted to foster. He was too much for us too so we had to hand him off to another rescue, but he never ran off for us. I eventually went to a breeder to get another Sheltie. After adopting a senior and having him die 18 months later, we didn't want to keep going through all that grief, so we didn't want another senior at that time.

While the rescues may be too strict, I understand where they are coming from after seeing the shape some of them are in when we get them, it's no wonder the rescues want to make sure they are going to a good home. The complaint I hear most often is the 'baggage' these dogs have. When talking to people about the benefits of adopting these dogs we mention;

Fostered by a loving family who treats them as their own. Much better on the dogs than sitting in a shelter.

Foster parents work with the dog to manage or correct any issues they might have.

Dogs get much better care. In addition to the money I put out to care for my fosters our director spares no expense to make sure they get the best Vet care possible. I've picked up a couple fosters from other rescues where the dogs were given basic vaccines but much more serious health issues were ignored. I know our director spent over $1,000 on several of my fosters for vet care. Anyone who adopts them is getting a bargain. There are good rescues and bad, just like there are good breeders and bad.

All should be house broken by the time they are ready for adoption and most know at least some tricks. That should come in handy for any prospective adoption family.

Fosters are evaulated so that a dog is properly matched to a home. Isn't it good to know if a dog is good with cats or young kids. You pick one up from a shelter or breeder you know hardly anything about them.

Yes, some foster parents decide to keep the good ones, but don't they deserve it after all the work they put in? We can't keep all the good ones and it's hard to let them go but it makes me happy to get reports back from their new parents who tell us what wonderful dogs they are.

If you explain the good points about adopting a rescue and they still 'hate rescues', then it's their loss. They probably wouldn't make good adoptive parents anyway.
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» There has since been 80 posts. Last posting by , Jun 17 11:39 pm

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