GO!


Behavior & Training > Learning Dog Language

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Sun Mar 30, '14 8:07pm PST 
There are more and more resources for learning how to read your dog's body language. They communicate all the time.
Here's a few:
Dog I-box www.dog-ibox.com
has two webinars to teach you how to observe dogs
Fenzi Dog Sports Academy www fenzidogsportsacademy.com
has several online courses"
Dog as a Second Language
Behavior Adjustment Training (BAT)
There is even a course to teach you how to read and help destress your dog in the ring.

What others do you know about?
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Mar 30 8:07 pm

Sports & Agility > Our Introduction to Canine Freestyle/Heelwork To Music
Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 3, '13 4:46pm PST 
There are online groups such as at yahoo you can join to keep you motivated.
Tons of 'how to' training videos on youtube. Here's a list of some you might get some ideas from.
www.dogvideoindex.blogspot.com
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Feb 3 4:46 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Blog and 'how to' videos for service dogs

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 3, '13 4:29pm PST 
Check out our blog that has text, photos, videos and training via webcam support for people training their own service dog:

www.viassistancedogs.blogspot.com
www.dogvideoindex.blogspo t.com

Subscribe if you find them helpful!
Approved by forums moderator
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 3 7:44 pm


Behavior & Training > List of FREE 'How to' Training videos!

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 3, '13 4:25pm PST 
Here is a list of free dog training videos. Shows you how to break down the behaviors into easy doable steps. Some cool behaviors and service tasks too!

Subscribe if you find them helpful!
www.dogvideoindex.blogspot.com
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Feb 6 1:30 pm


Raw Food Diet > Still don't understand 'Raw"

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 27, '11 9:00pm PST 
Here's my video that introduces you to how to feed, helpful for those just startin out. I forgot to mention eggs as a protein source. I give them 1 per 30-40lb dog once a week cooked up as omelettes for training treats.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stZCSUJa4EU
There is a part 2 myths and facts too! I don't use a strictly prey model diet and I feed cheese and yogurt and veggies/fruits.
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Apr 27 9:00 pm

Raw Food Diet > Contacted a local farm, but what do I ask for?
Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 27, '11 9:17am PST 
You'll need 10% organ meats-liver, kidney, brain and gizzards
For muscle meat, it can be anything from heart, tripe to meat from anywhere on the body.
You can feed just about any type of meat, depending on what you dog can tolerate-that you will find out over time. Start with one meat for a couple of weeks, then try another.
For 10% bone you can use long pork ribs, fowl wings, necks and backs-depending on the size of your dog.
Here's my video that introduces you to how to feed, in case you are just starting out.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=stZCSUJa4EU
There is a part 2 myths and facts too! I don't eat a strictly prey model diet.
[notify]
» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Apr 29 9:39 am


Behavior & Training > New behavoir?

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 9, '10 4:43pm PST 
All it takes for food aggression to start is one negative response from you when he reacts to taking food away. Start by hand feeding him his food, one handful or even kibble at a time. Sit on the floor and give it to him. Graduate to placing your hand in his dish face up and with one kibble. Then one kibble in his dish while keeping your hand nearby. Always add food to his dish, never take it away. He'll soon learn that a hand near his dish means good things. Never reward unwanted behavior as you are doing this.

Use the clicker to counter condition him to reacting with other animals nearby. Perhaps put him in his crate as he feeds so you can start further away and work closer. This will help protect the other animals. Of course if he is reactive with other animals near his crate, don't try this as it will make the problem worse. As the other animal is leashed and walked by with a helpter, you can c/t for staying calm, or use the open bar closed bar method. Here he is only rewarded for staying calm in the presence of the other animals. When they leave, the food stops. he will come to associate their presence with good things.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Feb 14 2:44 pm


Behavior & Training > My dog got in a fight at Doggy Day Care...Please help with ideas

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 9, '10 4:34pm PST 
Given her age and her breed, I'd be expecting more of this type of behavior. Great Pyraneese need to have heavy socialization as they tend to bond with the sheep, not other dogs. In fact other dogs are seen as threats to their sheep. Given that she is an adolsecent, she will be moving towards her natural tendancy of challenging other dogs.
I am not saying that she necessarily started the altercatiosn, she may be responbding to the body language of other dogs in the same stage of life. Also, sometimes, some dogs just don't like each other, despite playing as pups. Too close in gae, assertiveness etc might mean they will always challenge each other. If its important to you that she get along with other dogs, I'd get some help from a professional positive trainer or behaviorist now before she develops this as a habit.
Some dogs are not meant to be in high density dog uncontrolled situations, be dog park, daycare or wherever. She might do better where everyone is leashed and under control so no face to face encounters such as popular leashed walking area in your city such as downtown.
[notify]
» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Feb 10 12:33 pm


Behavior & Training > Can Any Dog Be Trusted Off Leash?

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 9, '10 4:27pm PST 
I think it depends WHERE, WHEN & HOW you want to let them off leash. I've always had my dogs off leash from the get go, but I work in bush areas where there is lots of room to run. Make sure you have a strong bond with your dog and they'll always keep an eye on you. Play games like hide and seek so they learn to watch you.
Jessie came to use because she kept running away from her previous owner. When animal control finally picked her up, they siad they didn't want her. She's never run away from us. Started out on a long line for short bit, did some clicker training for her to keep an eye on us each time along the trails, then gradually started trusting her off. One day about 4 mos after we got her, we let her off and she took off after a bird-her favorite thing to do, deeper and deeper in she went in really thick salal and there was no way to go get her. We waited for 5 min and she came running happily back to where she had left us. Another time GSP buddy took off with her in tow. She came back after 3 min and the GSP not for 10 min.
My sister-in-law trained her two rescued greyhounds to watch her. Never had a problem.
I suspect that most dogs will come back, if they don't get scared while far away. A friend's dog bolted after a deer while off leash for the first time and got hit by a car. They have only once ever let their current dog off because of their fear, and he bolted home 2 blocks with Jessie in tow. They both came back.
Where you choose to let them off is key. Train them gradually to be able to do it. Choose times when there are fewer distractions. Use common sense.
I think it's about how, where and when you give your dog freedom.
[notify]
» There has since been 53 posts. Last posting by , Feb 21 4:21 pm

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.