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Puppy Place > My 4-week old husky pups smell & feel disgusting. Bathing suggestions?


Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 9, '13 5:18am PST 
BTW- are parasites present???
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Mayhem, Jan 24 7:31 pm

Puppy Place > My 4-week old husky pups smell & feel disgusting. Bathing suggestions?


Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 9, '13 5:16am PST 
Oh...my gosh.

if the urine and fecal matter is allowed to get into their eyes and noses, you could end up with a slew of upper respitory issues and eye infections.

Poor little pups. My goodness.

I'd say baby shampoo is your best bet. Johnson and Johnson makes an all natural foaming cleanser that's scentless and works *really* well and is non drying.

Please please be careful when you clean their faces. Do NOT use the same washcloth on their eyes that you do on the rest of them...not sure how you're going about cleaning them, exactly, whether you're going to submerse them in a bath or what's going on...

Why did you let the pups get so filthy in the first place? If you noticed the dam wasn't keeping them clean, why wait until they're covered in waste and other grossness?
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Mayhem, Jan 24 7:31 pm


Behavior & Training > Hyperactive GSD



Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 8, '13 5:01am PST 
IMHO, if you have to give your dog pills to calm him/her down on a daily basis, you have to consider whether you as an owner are meeting that dog's needs.

I feel that that's why proper puppy/dog placement from breeders and rescues as well is VITAL. Active, high energy, dedicated owners should be placed with high energy prospects, especially when it comes to those high octane herding dogs.

I know that my dog, who is high drive/high energy DOES have an off switch if she's given a proper outlet. Both training and exercise are needed to wear her out. If she's still edgy and bugging me for something to do, I feel that it's my problem for not providing her enough stimulation.

I don't feel that it's her "fault" and I'd never consider medicating her just to make her fit better into my life style.

At some point, you have to ask, "Am I really a good fit for this dog if I have to medicate him/her just to deal with the energy level?"

Again, especially with those herders, they're supposed to have boundless mental and physical energy. They're specifically bred for that in many cases. If you don't like those attributes, maybe it's time to consider an older shelter dog or a companion breed like pugs who don't need that caliber of mental and physical outlet.

This is why research is so important when choosing a dog. Whether you're picking a dog from the shelter or a puppy from a breeder, you can't just go with what's cute and force it to be what you want.

you want a dog that fits into your current lifestyle, not a dog that you and your family have to fit around.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Sadie, Jan 10 8:39 pm


Behavior & Training > Hyperactive GSD



Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 3, '13 8:42am PST 
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Sadie, Jan 10 8:39 pm


Puppy Place > New Picture of Gucci's Eyes



Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 21, '12 5:11am PST 
AND then you also have to take into consideration the piebald gene, which could be why that puppy is totally white. It might just be because she is white piebald on top of being a double merle.

She is NOT an albino.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Pooch ~ I miss you ~, Dec 21 12:17 pm

Puppy Place > New Picture of Gucci's Eyes


Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 21, '12 5:09am PST 
Mishka, huskies cannot come in merle, nor can they be double merle, so where do you get your information about that?

There's a BIG difference between China eyes and the eyes of a blue merle and the eyes of a double merle. I come from a herding breed, so unfortunately I know about color genetics.

The eyes of a double merle are damaged and cannot constrict to filter out light. Some cases are worse then others, but yes, they actually DO find bright light painful. Merle is a masking gene, much like brindle and sable. In most cases, a single copy will not result in blindness or deafness.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Pooch ~ I miss you ~, Dec 21 12:17 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Which way to go?



Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 17, '12 10:45am PST 
I totally agree...dogs that were specifically bred to work with people are "easier" to train and tend to be more focused on humans in general then dogs that were bred to think independently. Also agree that you should NEVER leave a husky/mix or a hound/sighthound/mix off lead as it's asking for trouble.

Your best bet may be a breed rescue rather then trying to evaluate temperaments in a shelter enviornment.
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by holly, Dec 22 5:43 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Dalmatians aren't really bad with kids, are they?



Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 12, '12 4:39am PST 
I have to be honest, OP, with what your needs are and with what everyone has said, I don't think that Dals are a good fit for you.

If you had come here saying, "I am looking for a challenge dog with super high energy that doesn't have to be great with kids or strangers that I can just enjoy for what he/she is," then I'd be more likely to say, "Well, maybe a Dal would be a good fit."

But, you came on here saying that you want a dog that's good with kids, and that can do agility and obedience and you basically picked a dog (because of looks?) that's the opposite of what your needs are.

Honestly, you'd be much better off with a field-bred lab then a dalmation. They're exactly what you're looking for, except for the fact that they aren't flashy.

When I first got into dogs, I had a huge crush on Samoyeds. I LOVED the way they looked, moved, the fact that they are a working breed, can also herd, etc etc etc.

BUT, what I needed was a smaller dog with less coat who had a biddable nature and wanted to work with me. I ended up with corgis LOL

Don't get caught up in the flash and glamour. Be realistic and you'll be a much happier dog owner. You need a dog that fits into YOUR lifestyle. Most of the high energy dogs that are rehomed are given away because their owners had to fit their life styles around the dog, that unfortunately that just doesn't work.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Lucille, Dec 12 8:37 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Dalmatians aren't really bad with kids, are they?



Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 11, '12 5:58am PST 
Stella, the worst health issue that Dals have isn't deafness. Not by far. I would suggest that perhaps you look into breeds a bit further before making assumptions.

I don't disagree that Dals can be born deaf and that the BAER testing is vital and probably all decent breeders do BAER test.

From my friends who have dals, the worst health problem is one that's currently being corrected as they are sort of in recovery as a breed at the moment. It has to do with the way their bodies cannot process certain protiens which cause renal failure.

That's why the AKC allowed dalmations to open the stud books and include pointers into their breedings, because the issue of renal failure occured in SO MANY dalmations it was unbelievable.

It would be nice for them if deafness was the biggest problem, but that's probably the mildest thing someone would have to worry about with a dalmation.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Lucille, Dec 12 8:37 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Dalmatians aren't really bad with kids, are they?


Member Since
01/04/2009
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 10, '12 12:49pm PST 
I guess I feel there's some kind of disconnect, because you seem very concerned about the welfare of your neices and nephews.

Other posters have stated that Dalmations have a low tolerance for being annoyed on the whole.

How are you reconciling that when most people are telling you that Dals typically aren't great with strangers, change, or kids in general?

Kind of back to my post, are you hoping to find that one in a million dalmation that will fit you, as opposed to you finding a better breed for yourself?
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Lucille, Dec 12 8:37 am

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