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Behavior & Training > GOOD OR BAD IDEA?!?!? Small and Large Breed Living Together?


Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 15, '14 4:51pm PST 
You should understand that dogs do not usually respond to "breeds", but to an individual animal. Only people differentiate them by breed. If you bring home a foster, it may be interesting to watch. Perhaps you can learn about your dog's interaction with dogs in general, but you will probably not learn about "breed" vs. "breed".
Also the size matters more to us than to dogs. For them a dog is a dog, even if larger or smaller. Sex of these dogs may play more importance than size. I saw Great Danes or Mastiffs playing with Chihuahuas and Yorkies. On the other hand many same breed dogs may be very hostile to one other. Sometimes same sex aggression may play be a decisive role before "breed".
Bottom line - You have to try and see.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Mon 10:09 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Bullmastiff 101


Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu May 29, '14 5:44pm PST 
An age old thread. No idea why the person who started it (the OP) took the time to write such a long post, criticizing a particular breed.
The Bullmastiff is a wonderful breed when bred, trained and socialized properly. Much of what she wrote can be attributed to any large breed. Change the name to Rottweiler, Akita, or German Shepherd and... voila. Of course, bad breeding, with no attention to temperament and health can lead to unpleasant results with any breed.
Bullmastiffs rule!
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» There has since been -1 posts. Last posting by , May 29 5:44 pm


Puppy Place > Foster Failing



Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 30, '14 1:40pm PST 
How can you declare "foster failing" after 3 weeks? Its a long process measured in months/years, not weeks. Even the opposite (its a success!) cannot be determined in 3 weeks for a puppy that is constantly growing. Take your time, be patient and consistent. After all shots are done, start socializing him with dogs and people. Maybe register him at a puppy class.
One advice: Try not forcing people and dogs on your puppy if its shy. Some people and kids enthusiastically jump into puppy's face and trespass into his personal space. Try avoiding that by making introductions a causal, non-stressful event.
Good Luck!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , May 1 3:18 pm


Behavior & Training > Help with my bullmastiff



Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 30, '14 1:33pm PST 
It is important to diagnose the source of aggression. That however cannot be done while the dog is in the kennel. I would suggest having a dog behaviorist asses him.
In any case Bullmastiffs can be wonderful dogs. Once he settles in a new home (its a process, and in any case it cannot be said the dog is OK after only an hour or a day) it should be evaluated again.
Remember that large dog scare people more and likely deemed aggressive, when in reality they are not. A Pomeranian exhibiting similar behavior is more likely to be "forgiven".
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Apr 30 1:33 pm


Puppy Place > Alaskan malamute pup and biting - please help!



Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 13, '14 9:41pm PST 
Its normal puppy behavior. That's what most Malamutes will do. If you got the dog from a breeder, they should have explained that. Its all play at this age. He has bonded with you and sees you as his littermate or playmate. Its time to introduce more structure, training and discipline (suitable for a puppy. Anyway, this stage will pass as the dog matures.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Apr 13 9:41 pm

Doberman Pinscher > Jealous and spoiled Doberman


Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 19, '14 2:44pm PST 
Don't know if its still relevant, but never smack a Doberman. At 108 pounds he is also overweight and may need more exercise. They are very sensitive and your treatment may only worsen the situation. Also saying "no" is meaningless for dogs. They don't speak english.
Anyway, it may be a case of territorial dominance with the smaller pets and you may need to consult a dog behaviorist.
In all your interactions with the Dob, you need to show confidence and calmness. The dog senses your anger/frustration and interprets it differently than you want. Quick corrections may be more effective but the best is to distract him when other pets come in. A high value treat, cherished toy or game, may associate the pets with positive experiences.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Mar 19 2:44 pm


German Shepherd > 7 month old GSD - new pet



Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 19, '14 9:37am PST 
1) You can't judge a dog in 3 days! Time is very important with any dog. For her moving with you is a shock.
2) I wonder what kind of "breeder" is that... one who didn't socialize and train their dog, regardless of keeping or selling her. That is a red light!
3) The trainer is correct in recommending that all family members should bond with the new dog, yet things should be taken slowly, one pace at a time.
4) The best is to keep the dog busy, with many activities and games. These dogs like to be trained.
5) Age: she is a teenager and may soon be on her first heat. Take that into account, since any dog may show strange behaviors.
6) Nobody can tell you if to keep the dog or rehome her. Its your decision, but the dog wasn't given a chance. You should learn more about the breed and find a local club. They may have good advice.
7) A 3 hour training session with a new (and young) dog can be overwhelming. It may be too intensive for her in a new house. First let her get familiar with the new surroundings. ... As I said, do things at slower pace, little by little.
Good Luck!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Mar 19 9:37 am


Akita > Toshi only obeys to my boyfriend



Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 28, '13 9:55pm PST 
Your question is more about puppies in general, not so much breed specific:
Puppies go through different stages in their growing process. At this age they change every day. It should come at no surprise that he will change his attitude few more times. That said, following the time you spend with him, he probably feels closer to you and doesn't consider you an authority figure. Your boyfriend may be more assertive and the pup feels it. Its not about what you say, but the energy you radiate. You need to prove yourself a leader, for the future when this pup will become extremely strong and powerful and you will not be able to control it physically. Showing a quiet and self confident attitude is the key to becoming a leader for this dog.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Dec 28 9:55 pm


Akita > If you owned this Akita, what would you do?



Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 27, '13 5:49pm PST 
1) At this age (adult) a dog of this size and strength, its a serious matter! I would consult a dog behaviorist ASAP!
2) Nobody can advise anything serious on the internet, without assessing the dog, in person. However, from what you describe, it wasn't a full blown attack (fortunately), but an instinctive nip. As the dog's owner, its your responsibility not to fail him. By that I mean: why bring the dog to a dinner table full of attractions, when he cannot control himself? Keep him away from any potentially dangerous situations. Use a crate, kennel of feed the dog in a separate place when people eat.
3) Now I read that your dog exhibited food aggression before! Why didn't you take necessary precaution? Its irresponsible on your part!
4) Is he still intact?
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Mar 8 7:47 am

Behavior & Training > Seperation Anxiety?


Member Since
06/01/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 20, '13 4:58pm PST 
1) Don't know if its too late, but another puppy may add difficulty. Dogs are not human and 2 puppies are sometimes double trouble. An older dog is easier when you bring in another puppy.
2) Separation anxiety: you should let her feel safe and not abandoned. You cannot throw such puppy in a kennel and expect it to stay clam. Make the cage a "safe" place with the puppy in for 1-2 minutes. Let the door open and play with the dog inside the cage. Make it interesting, with new surprises to discover each time. Place the kennel so the dog can see you at all times. When you do away, do it first for a minute and then get back. Gradually increase the time you are absent until the dog is comfortable. It takes time and patience. Lots of patience.
Good Luck!
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Dec 22 12:07 pm

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