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Boxer > Agression?


Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 5, '13 11:08am PST 
Hey all, my service pup is having some issues, to the point where I have completely taken him out of any public setting in relations to 'working' He still knows his tasks, etc and does them at home, but I'm worried about taking him around places where other dogs might be. A few months ago, I was attacked by another dog, and my pup was on the other side of the fence from me and couldn't get to me. He kind of flipped out. Anyways, he got really really REALLY dog aggressive for a while, but I worked with him and he improved quite a bit, to the point that I could even take him to the dog park if there was only 1 or 2 other dogs. However, I recently moved, and there's another boxer across the street who is VERY aggressive, and consistently tries to attack my pup through the fence whenever we are outside. So of course he has regressed back to a high level of aggression towards dogs. The owner of the other boxer lets him run free around the neighborhood, and every time me and the pup go out for a walk or something, it seems like that darned dog is there waiting to bite. My pup will leave a dog alone once I tell him to, but when a dog is actively attacking him/me/us, there's no stopping him from protecting himself or I. It's just basic nature, and not something that I blame him for at all. Does anyone have any suggestions on things I could do to show him that not all dogs are mean, and that I don't need to be protected from every dog we meet? He gets along with dogs he knew from before I was bitten really really well, but any new dog completely freaks him out.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Aug 5 11:08 am

Dog Health > Pure White Stool


Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 15, '13 9:26am PST 
hey all, went to clean the dog poop out of the yard today and noticed that a decent amount of my dog's stools are white. I don't know if it's just because it's getting cold in the morning with frost, or if there's seriously an issue. I am concerned about his liver and kidneys.

When he was still my roommate's dog (she decided she didn't feel like keeping him when we parted so I took him), he got into 2 whole chocolate cakes in two days. I was gone from the area, so by the time I found out a couple of days had passed and the vet said there was nothing I could do about it. My roommate thought that it was no big deal......but I've been concerned about it ever since. There was also a time that I plum forgot I had chocolate covered macademia nuts (about 10-15) in my backpack, and left him alone in the room with it while I went outside to check the mail and chat with a neighbor. When I came back in, he had eaten it. I got him to throw up right after, but I was still reminded of all of the chocolate he's eaten in such a small amount of time.

I have school throughout the day for the next week (big final projects coming up, lots of team meetings). So I'm trying to decide if I should get my dog in immediately, or if you think that it should wait a few more days to see if it improves - If he's sick I don't want him to get any sicker, but I just don't know if white stool means that he's ill. He acts like a healthy, happy puppy

PS. He has no worms or anything in his stool, this is pure white/light clayish looking stool. He got tested for Worms 3 weeks ago and came back all clear. So I don't think that's a huge concern
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Tucker, Apr 15 12:45 pm


Boxer > Very very worried.......



Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 15, '13 9:17am PST 
hey all, went to clean the dog poop out of the yard today and noticed that a decent amount of my dog's stools are white. I don't know if it's just because it's getting cold in the morning with frost, or if there's seriously an issue. I am concerned about his liver and kidneys.

When he was still my roommate's dog (she decided she didn't feel like keeping him when we parted so I took him), he got into 2 whole chocolate cakes in two days. I was gone from the area, so by the time I found out a couple of days had passed and the vet said there was nothing I could do about it. My roommate thought that it was no big deal......but I've been concerned about it ever since. There was also a time that I plum forgot I had chocolate covered macademia nuts (about 10-15) in my backpack, and left him alone in the room with it while I went outside to check the mail and chat with a neighbor. When I came back in, he had eaten it. I got him to throw up right after, but I was still reminded of all of the chocolate he's eaten in such a small amount of time.

I have school throughout the day for the next week (big final projects coming up, lots of team meetings). So I'm trying to decide if I should get my dog in immediately, or if you think that it should wait a few more days to see if it improves - If he's sick I don't want him to get any sicker, but I just don't know if white stool means that he's ill. He acts like a healthy, happy puppy.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Donovan Rest in Peace, Jun 3 8:25 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > How to handle people wanting to have a 'service dog'



Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 18, '13 1:58am PST 
I'm not interested in monitoring whether someone obeys the law or not. I really couldn't care less about that, my time volunteering with the police force quickly taught me that pretty much everybody breaks the law at multiple points in their life. But when someone's asking me, I'll tell them what I know. If it pisses them off, too bad, so sad, I tell them and leave. I don't butt in and go 'hey, you're smoking too close to the door." or "Y'all are soliciting, time to stop". I know most laws in my state backwards and forewards, but unless I"m actively on duty, I will never tell a person they need to obey the law, and won't tell them the law unless asked by them. I never told her that she couldn't have a service dog at all, all I told her was that if the dog didn't do a task as defined, then it didn't fall underneath the law as a service dog. Between the ADA and the State codes here, that is very true. I checked. And I wasn't judging her based on our conversation alone - I know her quite well though, and know that she likes to take advantage and manipulate whenever she can, so I guess I do have a pre-existing disdain. I'm not particularly proud of developing a judgement ever, but I do make it a point to not make a snap judgement. I've developed this over years of knowing her (going on 10 years now). I didn't sit there and tell her that I would make sure she never brought the dog, or that she couldn't have one at all, or that she wasn't disabled, because that's not my place to say. But knowing the laws and codes (The ADA I'm still a little new to), I'll give someone the information if they engage in a conversation about it. But I'm not going to tell them how to do something. So I agree that it's not my job to make sure she obeys the law. And I also agree it's not up to me to make a judgement concerning her need for an SD, which I didn't do. But I do know this woman well, and I do not trust her, and won't give her anymore information than the necessary that she can find on her own. I figure that's OK, but the rest of it (like figuring out what tasks she needs the dog to do) is definitely not my place. I can't tell her what tasks she needs or should teach - if she can't think of a task to train, then that's too bad. But it's not my place to give her a list of tasks and say 'teach him this'. Taht wouldn't help her.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Polly, Mar 20 1:02 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > One more thing.....Down Stay



Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Mar 15, '13 4:38pm PST 
He doesn't have that much trouble getting up, only when he's pushing up on his hind legs too much. It pitches his whole body forward and then he'll have a hard time righting himself. But like I said, it happens sometimes. Not all the time. And has been dramatically decreasing in the last few months as his body starts to get bigger and his head stays the same. Within the next year he'll be fully grown and most likely perfectly proportionate. So no, I am not wary about using him as an SD, and I have never put him in a downstay yet - I move around too much, I'm very paranoid about being in the same place for more than about 3 minutes, which really isn't worth putting him into a down stay, a sit/stay is way easier. And with losing my vision, I prefer to have things where I can touch them, including my SD. To each his or her own in what they are/aren't OK with in a service dog, and to each their own on whether or not they put them into a down/stay all the time.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Nova, Mar 19 6:32 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > One more thing.....Down Stay


Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 14, '13 11:16pm PST 
only problem is, he won't lay down.......at all. I've trained him against it to the point that he just won't do it. At home we don't have a problem. Anywhere else......not so successful. And I don't even know where to begin with him. He's following his previous training well, but it's hindering his ability to learn the command 'down' is an OK thing to do. I carry around treats everywhere so that ANY time he does it in the appropriate setting he gets a treat, it's just hard to figure out how to make him understand that it is OK outside of the house. :p
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Nova, Mar 19 6:32 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > One more thing.....Down Stay



Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 14, '13 2:42pm PST 
Hey all, I'm wondering something. I never taught my dog downstay, because he has a bit of a hard time getting up due to his rather large head (he pitches forward if he gets up too fast, it's actually pretty hilarious) However, I've recently started going back to school, and many of my classes are 3 horus a time. He does great in a sit/stay, which is what I trained him in. However, it just seems plain out cruel to leave him in that position for 3 hours, so I've lately just given him the cue to stay close, and he'll sit until he gets tired and then lie down. I want to help get him to a point where I can give him a command to lie down and stay - any suggestion on how to do this? I've literally never done it with him, ever. I need him to be able to jump up quickly when we're out and about, but in class I don't think I"ll need that so much. And now I regret teaching him sitstay without also teaching down/stay. He loves to learn, but I'm not sure where to start, because he's very reluctant to lie down while working due to his training. I think I'm going to need to break down some training and build it back up, not quite sure where that would be though. Thanks!
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Nova, Mar 19 6:32 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > How do you address your service dog



Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 14, '13 2:34pm PST 
I agree that dogs are smart. I also talk to my dog with direct words. He also sits and listens if I need to blow off some steam, patiently waiting until I"m done. I also consistently talk to him when we're out and about (I suffer from very severe anxiety at times, talking to him helps me feel better. Plus, I put my bluetooth in and it looks like I"m talking on the phone so people leave me alone.) While I do this, he carries out his various tasks like blocking, or deep pressure - all while paying attention. And now that I've figured out why he was misbehaving so ferrociously the past month, we've fixed the problem so he can come back out in public with me, even though we're still doing a lot of training runs in addition to actual activities. But I think if a dog was really a stupid animal, he wouldn't be able to respond to my behavioural cues (I don't have any ommands for most of my tasks with him, they are cued solely by behavioural markers), or be able to follow my lead when I'm talking to him and do give him a command in the middle of talking and then return straight back to talking. They would need direct commands and onsistent treat motivation to do anything. So I too talk to them very matter of factly and point forward. They're smart, they deserve to be treated as part of the living breathing team - not as a tool without thoughts and feelings and opinions of their own.
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» There has since been 21 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Jun 29 9:41 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > How to handle people wanting to have a 'service dog'



Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 14, '13 2:26pm PST 
Hey all, I have someone at church who saw me with my dog a couple of weeks ago, and she asked me how she could get her companion card for her dog. I was confused, so I said that I didn't know what she was talking about, that they weren't required. And she said that she had a prescription from her doctor to have a companion dog, and that she could take him with her. Now, me being the brat I am, I promptly (subtly) tested her knowledge of anything to do with service dogs. I asked her if she had a disability, she said yes. I asked her what her dog did for her. She said it made her feel better. I asked if he had any specific tasks, and she said "oh, he can roll over and sit and shake hands!" And I just about lost it, I thought it was so hilarious that she had no idea. So I told her that unless her dog did a specific task, it wasn't deemed a service dog under the law, and that it wouldn't be able to go everywhere with her. She of course got quite angry and said that yes, he could go everywhere with her because she had a prescription. I told her that's only with housing. So she asked me what tasks she needed to teach her dog to go out in public, after telling me that she didn't need him for anything other than comfort. I told her if she didn't need him for something specific, then it wasn't a service dog. Now, I'm pretty sure I understand the laws correctly, but I've run into quite a few 'service dogs' in my area where the owners simply say "Oh, they make me feel better. I just like having them near." How do I handle this? I was grateful at church, we have a few people who raise dogs for service training, and they backed me up and said I was correct. However, I still worry about all of these people who bring these dogs in that don't fit the description. It's mildly infuriating. How do I handle something like that? Or am I totally wrong and been misinterpreting the ADA and FHA this whole time?
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Polly, Mar 20 1:02 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Going to train my own PSD, could definately use some help.


Member Since
02/17/2013
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 22, '13 2:06am PST 
I don't know how I came across this thread, but I figured I'd add some things I've learned about PSD programs.

First off, every PSD program I"ve contacted say that I need to have been in treatment (Seeing a therapist, psychiatrist, and if necessary a neurologist) for AT LEAST 2 years. I was lucky, I was diagnosed right after my Dad was when he attemted suicide. My condition is actually far worse than my fathers - I've been hospitalized multiple times for various reasons. For these reasons, the prgrams I have contacted have accepted me as a potential candidate. But most programs I've run into do require a certain amount of attempted treatment, proof of your condition (Just a doctor's note for most, though I give a full release since half the time I don't even know what's wrong with me, other than I go flat out insane and randomly attack people when I get anxious or psychotic). I am one of those people that without something to get in my way, I'm a danger to the public. I am not allowed out on my own at all for the past while. And I didn't qualify for the programs in my area until like 2 months ago.

That being said, I was going in a downhill spiral like, 2 years ago, and I needed that extra help that dogs can provide with distracting, barriers, etc. so I decided to OT on my doctor's suggestion. I got myself a wonderful Boxer from a rescue, and he has worked wonderfully for me in the past while. However, he's recently developed such severe behavioral problems (by my standards. Pulling on the leash and lunging for treats is not acceptable behaviour in my book.) that I can no longer take him out. Even the trainer I asked for help (I just moved so it's a new trainer) Said that she didn't think he could return to SD status if I didn't like him pulling on the leash. The main problem is he's getting distracted by people more and more as time goes by, which isn't a good thing for either of us. So earlier today I made the very difficult decision to 'wash out' my SD. He will remain with me as a Skilled Companion Animal (He still alerts me to medical issues quite well at home), but it looks like I will be needing to contact a program to go through this time for a SD. So there are definitely some pros and cons to it all, but if you're going to go through with getting a SD, Really look at what you would need it for, and compare to how much it's worth it. I would recommend giving therapy some more time though, because it really can help. You don't want a PSD unless you really need it, becaue the access issues can be pretty major. I've had anxiety attacks so bad after access challenges I actually went into seizures (But I have a seizure disorder too). So like someone else said, you really cannot understand just how difficult access issues, and people petting your dog, and asking about your disability can be until it happens. If you can't handle the rudest people following you through the store screaming that you're not disabled and shouldn't have a dog in the store (Believe me, it happens to some), I would question whether you want an ESA or an SD. Because it can be very hard sometimes, and almost as anxiety inducing as going out by yourself. It's definitely not all help and smiles, there's some days where I find it's actually more difficult for me to have a PSD then if I had gone alone. Whatever you choose to do, I really hope that it helps you feel that you can function better and improve your life.

Anyways, just my experiences and what I've found in my area.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Feb 23 11:47 am

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