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Sports & Agility > Issue with biting at hand during rally



Member Since
01/12/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 2:27pm PST 
Abused dogs bite frequently out of fear and with little warning. If you think your dog is biting because he was abused, get help from a professional animal behaviorist.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Jan 14 8:58 pm

Behavior & Training > Dogs new to horses . . .. what are the common reactions?


Member Since
01/12/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 2:18pm PST 
So there have been lots of doggie posts me included so what kind of dogs do you have? Do they go trail riding? How old are they? And what breed?
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» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by , Jan 26 4:15 pm


Behavior & Training > Commands Without Speaking



Member Since
01/12/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 2:16pm PST 
Teaching hand signals is easy. Always give your hand signal in a distinct way so the dog doesn't assume you are just scratching your nose or grabbing for something. Formal obedience trial regulations allow the handler to use a single motion of the entire arm and hand but penalize any body motion — something to think about! It's imperative to use clear, concise, and consistent commands if you want your dog to understand and comply. The hand signals that will be most useful are those that communicate the frequent requests like sit, down, stay, and come.
Whistle Signals

Whistles are commonly used to train hunting dogs or dogs who need to work at a distance from their handlers. That's because the sound travels so well and serves as the clear, concise form of communication that's necessary for this kind of work. Initially, though, the dog must be trained close to the handler to understand the association between behaviors and whistles. Using the leash, guide the dog in the desired movement following your whistle. As you move your dog into position, she should associate the movement with your verbal command, and because she has felt and seen the same movements, she should understand and follow the guidance eagerly. Generally, one toot of the whistle means sit and stay, and multiple toots mean come into the heel position of sitting by the handler's side.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jan 14 1:16 pm


Behavior & Training > Your preferred leash length



Member Since
01/12/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 1:59pm PST 
I use standard nylon leashes or slip rope leashes. Regular length -- 3ft I think. I like the leashes to be a tad longer than the dogs body. Use whatever leash is most practical for you. For me, 6ft is extremely unpractical, especially with multiple dogs. Too much leash for me. 3ft is much more manageable.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Jan 14 7:30 am


Behavior & Training > Small children and dogs unsupervised. Rant.



Member Since
01/12/2013
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 13, '13 1:43pm PST 
I was just wondering, do you guys believe this applies to bull breeds only? Would you leave two terriers alone? Two hounds? Labs?
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Jan 13 8:48 pm

Behavior & Training > Dogs new to horses . . .. what are the common reactions?


Member Since
01/12/2013
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 12, '13 9:11pm PST 
I always wondered how horses and dogs go together. at first glance seem to be afraid of each other. but if you look through the history of each horse had a dog. as a female dog lover and can not connect those facts.

They say dog is man’s best friend, but I’m not sure the dog agrees. In fact it looks to me like dogs have a big soft spot for horses. Can you blame them?
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» There has since been 19 posts. Last posting by , Jan 26 4:15 pm

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