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Choosing the Right Dog > What breed should I get?
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 20, '12 8:26am PST 
since it's morning and I'm not brain-dead on lack of sleep, I've been trying to think of actual breeds the OP might want to look into (since all I contributed last night was "don't get a GSD").

Some thoughts...

American Eskimo- super cute, I think aesthetically they might appeal to someone who likes GSDs, and are a much more manageable size. Long soft hair, but not super high-maintenance. Very athletic and smart.

Keeshond- similar to the Eskie but even fluffier (and brown/grey instead of white), and a little bigger, still manageable. Sometimes considered the most mellow, novice-friendly Spitz/Nordic breed. Not slouches, just not as temperamental as say, Chows, or as energetic as Huskies.

Rough Collie- can be hit or miss. When poorly bred, they can be overly sensitive and fearful (the "shopping cart" issue) but if you look hard you can find one that is how they're meant to be- sensitive but not neurotic, very willing to please and in-tune with their person. A LOT more mellow than Aussies, still very athletic and trainable. May be too large though.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Sep 20 1:58 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > What breed should I get?
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 19, '12 11:27pm PST 
Since everyone else has beaten to death "dogs aren't children" I'll stay mum on that, other than to say I agree...

I would NOT choose a GSD based on your requirements, is my two cents. They tend to be huge money pits in the vet bills department, and a true heartbreak breed in that it's not just one genetic condition you have to watch for, it's literally dozens (that are more common in GSDs than dogs in general.) There also are SO many lines and types of GSD that a novice can easily end up with too much dog, or the wrong temperament for their situation.

Also, I assume you are young-ish and starting out, (pardon me if that's not true) and it can be hard to find cheap/decent housing with a GSD. They are on a lot of breed-ban lists, plus they are large and many landlords impose weight limits. frown I am running into this, and Bruno isn't even a purebred anything, he just LOOKS like a GSD mix.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Sep 20 1:58 pm


Behavior & Training > Anxiety and my role as a leader

Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 19, '12 10:05pm PST 
How much/what type of daily physical exercise is he getting? How much mental exercise?

I think many high-strung dogs benefit from increased physical activity. (True for humans too. The endorphins released actually change your brain chemistry- exercise is great for both depression and anxiety.) And doing activities that require mental work too will build your bond and increase his trust in you, PLUS use up mental energy that he's currently using on hypervigilance.

But don't blame yourself for the way he is- from what I've read, AKK are often like this (watchful, anxious, neophobic)- it's really something you have to work on HARD when they're young to prevent, and breeders might not make this clear.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Sep 19 10:05 pm


Behavior & Training > How NOT to handle resource guarding

Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 17, '12 12:45am PST 
Tiller, what books/videos/articles jive most with your methods to discourage posessiveness/instill foodspace tolerance? Specific resources for puppy raisers? I know it's a little off-topic, I'm just curious. This is something (along with a laundry list of other things...) I want to do right with my next dog, since Bruno is kind of a beast about possessing objects from other dogs. Sounds like you have a good system, and from what I've seen, most resources out there don't address dog-dog guarding as much as dog-human guarding.
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» There has since been 83 posts. Last posting by , Sep 19 1:06 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Planning ahead-looking for the right breed

Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 1, '12 9:37pm PST 
Labs and Golden Retrievers might fit your bill. They can be very active and boisterous as young dogs, but generally have a pretty good "chill mode" once mature (and provided enough exercise and social time with you.)

Super-duper trainable, ball and frisbee lovers too (since they ARE retrievers.) Some people seem surprised at how athletic these common couch-potato breeds are- but it's because most of them never get the chance to live up to their full potential, and they're easy to overfeed and make obese, which slows them down (since they love food). Keep a Lab trim, give him serious exercise every day, and you'll have a killer canine athlete. They also have a reputation as dumb- not so! Both retriever breeds are tops in competitive obedience, as detection dogs, guide dogs, SAR dogs, etc.

I love Aussies too, but keep in mind, many are NOT friendly or mellow, they can be kind of intense and always keyed-up. Not ALL of them, but it's common enough in the breed. Often one-person or one-family dogs, fairly territorial and sometimes intolerant of strange dogs. A typical herding breed, in other words. smile

I think if you're looking to rescue, don't let breed labels influence you too much- often shelters get them just plain wrong. Or a dog may not be a typical representative of their breed. I would just try to keep an open mind and find a dog with the traits you want. They're definitely out there. Lots of mutts that will go jogging, play fetch, and be plenty bright.
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by , Sep 5 7:13 am

Sports & Agility > Agility for the Spectator
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 31, '12 4:40pm PST 
here, I made it into a clicky link for you.
How to Be a Spectator
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Oct 3 12:28 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > A Question for the Corgi Experienced...

Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 31, '12 3:48pm PST 
One of my agility friends has three Pembrokes and one Swedish Vallhund (Corgi cousin) and I've also known others. I wouldn't call them "unsocial" by a mile. Assertive sometimes, and they like to play rough, but it's all good-natured at heart.

I think dog-aggression is more common in Cardigans, but I haven't personally known any well enough to make a judgement on that.
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by , Oct 1 11:30 am


Behavior & Training > Is your dog stupidly loyal?

Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Wed Aug 29, '12 8:53pm PST 
Ginger was like Rocky- a few times my friends or housemates offered to walk her, she was not a happy camper with that at all. Outright refusal or tail-tucked unhappy trot. She didn't willingly go for walks with anyone but me. (Or by herself, but that's another story.)

I don't actually know what would happen if a friendly stranger tried to take Bruno somewhere (I don't mean someone he's completely unfamiliar with, just someone he doesn't see every day.) I've just never tried it because he's kind of dangerous in some situations, I don't trust most people could manage him safely in public. I don't even trust my own family on that count...
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by , Aug 31 5:53 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Maybe have to rehome Angel...:(

Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 8:32pm PST 
I agree with Nare, outdoor dogs can lead decent lives with the proper setup. An overhead cable could give her some space to move around, if you can't put up fencing. Yeah, it will be hard for her to transition to sleeping outside if she's always been an indoor dog, but I think that would be better than giving her away to a stranger (assuming no friends or family will help out.)

BTW, I did try to give Bruno away once, the first year I had him (long story). I didn't have any luck with it- the first person to answer my ad seemed nice and very capable, I even checked out her house, but then she backed out, saying she couldn't afford another dog after all. Every other response seemed super flaky, or hadn't seemed to have actually read the details of my ad (what part of "NO CATS OR LIVESTOCK" is hard to understand?). Maybe you would have better luck though, since Angel doesn't have any behavior issues (that I'm aware of.)
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Aug 30 7:35 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Good apartment dog?
Bruno CGC

Honorary Kelpie
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 27, '12 6:16pm PST 
is "150 lbs" a typo? 'Cuz it's hard to find a dog that isn't under that... smile I'm guessing you either meant 15 lbs or 50 lbs.

More thoughts... eating cat turds is entirely a management issue. Nothing to do with temperament or how well they get along with other pets. I don't think I've met a dog that would pass up "Kitty Roca". silenced You just have to ensure the dog doesn't have access to the box.

Most of the common pet breeds are popular for a reason- they're usually not difficult dogs for average owners. So i'd suggest looking around you for what breeds other people living your kind of lifestyle are happy with. (And then go research the heck out of them, so you know if their experience is typical or a fluke.)

My thought is, if you like the look of Pug crosses you might want to look for ones crossed with more mellow breeds than the JRT. I have no idea what a typical temperament for a "Jug" (as some call this mix) is. Probably varies, and you could end up with a pretty active dog.

A Boston Terrier might also fit- they're pretty good companion dogs, with a similar look to a Pug, and little bit of Terrier spunk (but not as much as the JRT, after all, a Boston is a gentleman.)
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» There has since been 17 posts. Last posting by , Sep 2 9:08 pm

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