Postings by Josie - CGC's Family

GO!

(Page 1 of 300: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

Raw Food Diet > Finally Jumping in!
Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Tue Mar 15, '11 11:03am PST 
For the gulper, it could help if you gave Tobi a bit more space. Looks like he was very aware of your proximity in the video. Almost everyone makes that mistake in the beginning, but try not to stare! Dogs don't like it when family stares at their food and it will make them want to eat as quickly as possible, because staring means you're about to challenge him for it!
laugh out loud

Also, the more challenging the RMB, the better. He looks almost big enough for chicken halves (or whole and you just take the rest away when he's had his ration from it)? Just wait 'til you get to pork hocks -- nom nom nom.
[notify]
» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Tobi, Mar 15 8:50 pm

Raw Food Diet > \"It\'s MINE!\"
Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 26, '10 1:04am PST 
blue dogblue dog Double post.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Dec 26 5:43 am


Raw Food Diet > \"It\'s MINE!\"

Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 26, '10 1:03am PST 
While feeding raw meat doesn't create food aggression, it can inspire possessive dogs to guard because it is so much more valuable than kibble. And food guarding is a natural behavior for all dogs, to some extent. However, if the problem has escalated to the point where the dog becomes a danger to anyone he may believe is a threat to his meal, we should be careful and train to lessen the threat of violence.

Raw can be a fantastic tool for calming possessive dogs, because we can feed larger, more challenging meals with a raw diet; and because fasting is a natural part of the raw feeding cycle.

Fasting not only gives the dog's system a well-needed rest, but it also gives us the opportunity to feed larger meals. Even one day of fast per week is very beneficial. One might think that a possessive dog would get worst with a fast, but in fact they often guard because they are not hungry, and they just don't want anyone else to get it. Do you have a dog that buries food? They're trying to self-fast!

"Why your dog needs to fill its stomach on a regular basis" (Mogens Eliasen) is my favorite internet article about why feeding large (infrequent) meals is important to dogs. Basically, because of the way their stomachs work, feeding small meals (like with kibble) keeps the dog feeling hungry all of the time. Your dog may act like he's starving all of the time (because he's fed frequent, small meals), but give him a large, challenging meal -- followed by a fasting day -- and you'll see the difference immediately! Begging and food searching behaviors will vanish, and he'll act satisfied for the first time in his life!

For a food-guarding dog, the feeling of always being hungry is a big trigger for their unhappy behavior. If you were hungry every hour of every day then you would eat like an inmate too!

And when we feed our dogs challenging meals -- food that consumes time and energy like the dog was designed to eat -- they are more satisfied with the food they have and less urgently guard it like the last meal they'll ever get.

In our case, feeding larger meals less often helped a food-aggressive dog learn to happily eat beside the rest of the family. Prevention is an important first step when dealing with food aggression, but there's nothing stopping us from looking to the future to try and cure the problem totally.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Dec 26 5:43 am


Food & Nutrition > Canine Nutritional Guides?

Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 26, '10 12:26am PST 
Here are a few favorites. big grin

Dr. Lonsdale's book "Work Wonders" http://www.rawmeatybones.com/book-ww.php

Dr. Billinghurst's "Give Your Dog A Bone" http://www.barfworld.com/html/dr_billinghurst/books_videos.shtml
[notify]
» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Dec 27 8:41 pm


Raw Food Diet > New to raw feeding

Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 20, '10 4:53pm PST 
It can be overwhelming for a new "rawbie" to get into spreadsheets and calculations... I find it exhausting to be so exacting. Instead, use your common sense and you can "eyeball it".

Feed about two and a quarter pounds a day, give or take. As long as it all averages out each week, you're good.

If you pick up a whole chicken, then figure out how many meals it makes up. Hand the whole chicken to the dog when you feel the dog has had enough each meal, just take it away until tomorrow. (Like, if it's a 5 lb. chicken then feed it over 3 days plus some organ.)

Organ is the only part of the diet you really need to measure out, and that's only to balance the vitamins and minerals. When I take my organs to the chopping block I measure out a few weeks' portions. I feed organs on a day during the week that I need some boneless meat to balance out a bony meal (like the chicken back left over from that whole chicken we fed earlier!).

Easy stuff.
way to go
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Josie - CGC, Dec 20 4:53 pm

Raw Food Diet > Whole Prey Variety?
Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Mon Dec 20, '10 4:37pm PST 
"Red meat should comprise at least half of the diet" is the rule of thumb. way to go

I have not heard that pig is high in O-3? Do you have a link?
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Maxwell, Dec 20 5:07 pm


Food & Nutrition > Advice for clients?

Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 18, '10 5:51pm PST 
If the dog is in such bad shape then you can bet she sees it too. Many people in that position believe the fault lies with the dog: "This is normal for [her]," and don't realize there is an easy dietary fix!

When I'm in this situation, the approach that works the best sounds like this:

"How long has [she] had [dry skin/an oily coat/this odor]?
thinking "What do you mean?"
"Well, I noticed that [her] skin seems irritated. Is this an ongoing issue?"
frown "Yeah, I've tried everything."
"What food do you feed her? Commonly, these issues can be resolved with a simple change of diet."
shock "[Some terrible brand of food], I heard it's good!"
"For dogs suffering with these kinds of issues, I recommend [a good brand of food], especially their fish or lamb formulas. It may be the only "fix" you need. You could see improvement in a week!"
big grin "Great! You're the best! I want to have your babies!" etc.

blue dog
[notify]
» There has since been 37 posts. Last posting by Dogster HQ, Dec 21 7:37 pm


Food & Nutrition > Tempting Kibble varieties?

Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 18, '10 5:34pm PST 
RAW has done "the trick" for our picky eaters! snoopy
[notify]
» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Quincy- FM TFE-II TDIAOV CGC, Dec 28 11:59 am


Food & Nutrition > Rib Bones from Pet Store

Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 18, '10 5:32pm PST 
Try a beef saddle knuckle bone instead. There's nothing that chips, splinters, or breaks off of a saddle knuckle. You can often find them raw at your local butcher's shop.
way to go
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Patches (R.I.P), Dec 18 7:24 pm

Raw Food Diet > 2 weeks of diarrhea...help
Josie - CGC

California Girl
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 18, '10 5:18pm PST 
Duke, I'm gonna repeat the good advice from Maxwell: Get your dog to the vet and get a fecal test done. Funky stools happen, but two weeks of diarrhea is more than enough cause for a thorough vet check.
way to go
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Josie - CGC, Dec 18 5:18 pm

(Page 1 of 300: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.