Postings by Manny 's Family

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Puppy Place > Leash Troubles!
Manny

So many places,- so little pee...
 
 
Barked: Mon Apr 23, '12 10:56am PST 
Ever heard the expression; "Ya gotta learn how to walk before you learn how to run"?

I allowed my dogs to pull the lead for years... Developed leash reactive dogs out of that, and have now spent about 2 years un-doing the bad habits established.

As mentioned by others, teach the pup it is fun, fun, fun to follow you around the yard. Work the leash into the backyard walk. Now take it all into the front yard with more distractions. Get that right, next short trips just a few houses down.

A loose lead, happy dog is a wonderful thing! Your best chance of getting there involves basic obedience class from a positive methods trainer. The $100 + investment now will pay you back over the next decade of living with your pet.
puppy
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Dora, Apr 24 8:05 am

Behavior & Training > Was this dog really 'friendly'?
Manny

So many places,- so little pee...
 
 
Barked: Thu Jan 19, '12 11:49am PST 
At best, a Tarzan-rude-greeter type. He could be that... ('um friendly') But still a danger to an older, or smaller dog, or a reactive dog.

Where was that polite play bow, and butt sniff?

Sort of like when you run into an over bearing salesman at the car dealership; STOP SHAKING MY HAND, AND GIVE ME SOME ROOM!!! And - When meeting new people, I don't generally sweep them into my arms and plant a big kiss on them. They'd arrest me for sure, ha ha!

And for the record I don't play bow or butt sniff either.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Nicky, Jan 20 4:17 pm


Behavior & Training > His behavior is getting worse

Manny

So many places,- so little pee...
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 18, '12 4:43pm PST 
It is probably best to seek local help that can see Scruffy and yourself in real life. Sooooo much depends on observing the context of the exact moment. Ask your local rescue groups about good trainers they know.

Scruffy sounds "Reactive". - He gets over stumulated at the sight of strange dogs and perhaps prey animals. He then re-directs his on-lead fustrations towards your dog, and worse onto you. My dogs have done the same, still working on it... Meanwhile:

Stop walking the dogs as a pair. You will need to devote all your attention to Scruffy when he reacts without another dog underfoot anyway.

When he has a reaction, be sure not to throw your own fustrations and emotions into the mix!!! - If I were shouting instructions and fuming at you as you dealt with this stuff, how well would you listen to me?

Long story short. You have a reactive dog, and you care about it. This is not something solved in a day, or on a web site. Ahhh, but the best dog trainers are the one with issues related dogs! After all, how much can the perfect Lassie teach you? Hope you enjoy your learning journey as much as I am, because I'm having a ball!

Dogstar is a great place to book mark, and take a peak into Grisha Stewart and B.A.T. training. Look at some YOU TUBE videos from both sites.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Scruffy (R.I.P.), Jan 18 7:08 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > A bit of help with adopting a shelter dog please

Sadie- Lickin's

Lick 'em all!
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 31, '11 4:25pm PST 
The shelter should be able to cat test her.

Two year olds are indeed more likely to get bitten. That is training and management of both parties. Hopefully the dog has bite inhibition learned as a pup playing with her littermates, and hopefully should a bite occur, you and yours will question if just maybe your little one might have done something to cause it. Too often, the families blame the dog first and most.

Many privite rescues do not adopt to families with young kids for that reason. Most public shelters are happy to place the dog no matter what.

Yes, returns do hurt many dogs. But the old saying is; Better to have loved and lost, than never to have loved at all.

You are thinking! - We like that yery much!!!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Sadie Lickin's, Dec 31 4:25 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > A bit of help with adopting a shelter dog please

Sadie- Lickin's

Lick 'em all!
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 30, '11 8:47pm PST 
Is this your first dog? It is tough to see how a dog will be around home at the shelter, the environments are waaaay different. Is she returnable if it does not work out? Is there a rescue group (free - donation?) or trainer ($$) that would evaluate her. If it does not work out, how would that go with the kids?

With these heavy questions in mind, I'd try for some on-site in person help.

VERY good luck, and thanks so much for thinking Rescue! - Responsible dog ownership is a good lesson for the kids to experience.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Sadie Lickin's, Dec 31 4:25 pm

Puppy Place > Crate or Outside?
Sadie- Lickin's

Lick 'em all!
 
 
Barked: Fri Dec 30, '11 8:30pm PST 
Crate, but start getting her used to it ASAP! Short sessions, throw human quality food inside the open crate for Alice to find. Feed her meals all inside there.

Ironclad rule: #1) Be SURE the dog does not have to pee... #2) If you are sure about #1, NEVER let a whining / barking dog out of the crate. - They will stop. Then let them out. #3) When you attempt to do the first overnights, you should plan to get up about 5-am to honor Rule #1. - This would be a no frils operation. No petting, few happy voices, or companionship. Walk out to the pee area, pee, return, crate. Leave. Expect barking. Time it, the barking will stop in 10 minutes.

My dogs now can sleep anywhere, but two rooms of the house have open door crates, and that is where you will find them about 80% of the time.


Bad things happen to young dogs outdoors. They can be stolen, or discover digging and escaping.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by The Hounds of Bassetville +3, Jan 13 2:38 pm


Behavior & Training > Proofing commands at a distance?

Manny

So many places,- so little pee...
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 8, '11 8:37pm PST 
We have an emergency Sit. If your dog had run across that road, you certainly wouldn't want hime to do an emergency recall and dash back across.

The previous bark is correct. Start by having him SIT maybe as he is behind the fence. YOU can increase YOUR distance. Once he gets the idea of any distance, you can come inside the yard, and work the distance thing gradually out to where he is across the yard from you.

(Need to proof Sadie on this... My bad.)
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by Augusta, CGC, RN, Apr 12 6:44 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > What are your views on adopting/dealing with shelters?

Sadie- Lickin's

Lick 'em all!
 
 
Barked: Thu Dec 8, '11 5:06am PST 
There are fantastic dogs in shelters. My theory is you are more likely to find a great dog in a kill shelter over a no kill. Why? Because the kill shelter culls the behavior cases. In my area, there is a poor munciple kill shelter within walking distance of a rich locally famous no-kill one. Having volunteered for both, the no-kill shelter has all the behavior problem dogs!

The thing for the pet adopter to think about is; There is no way to know how ANY kenneled animal is going to act, once out of the shelter and in a home!!! IF you really know your animals and can make that decade long life commitment in the back room of the shelter, please, please go and directly save a life!

If you are not experienced, a home-based rescue that is honest about the dogs in their care is the best choice. My last foster was cute as a button, but had minor behavior issues. I knew she woud not be right in a family with kids. Can't remember how many families I had to direct away from her, some that would argue back about it! Finially, after 7 months "THE ONE" came along, and Red 38 was adopted.

After having Red in my home for about 8 weeks 24/7, we knew EVERYTHING about her. How she slept, what she would bark at, what she was like at my work office, out on a walk, at the vet's. You get the idea...

The people in any shelter or rescue for that matter range from loving salt of the Earth types to abusive horrible monsters. Pretty much like everywhere else in the world.
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» There has since been 53 posts. Last posting by Conker, May 4 1:28 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > It's over :(

Spirit- is Home!

I love my- forever home.
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 22, '11 5:24am PST 
Late to the thread, but sounds like your foster score is something like 20 wins, 1 loss. Thats an easy team to bark for!
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Lily Anne, Nov 24 9:02 pm

Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Oh Poo!
Sadie- Lickin's

Lick 'em all!
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 21, '11 1:54pm PST 
As an occasional foster home, we more note the comings and goings of foster dogs than most. There is a beginning to the foster experience, a middle, an end, and afterward a period of reflection. One looks back; What worked well? What mistakes were made? Was it a good experience for both the dog and my family?

Lately, my period of reflection has been associated with picking up the poop from the yard. This may sound strange, but pooper-scooping is a calm, quiet event usually done alone (Why would that be?) that easily lends itself to reflection. And there is something really final about picking up that last piece of poop from a foster and putting it in the can; The dog is gone, and there won't be any more of where that came from!

Today I remember my favorite foster, "Red 38" as I cleaned the yard. For those that don't know, she is the first dog that I went into the shelter, tested, pulled, rehabilitated and adopted out. The whole nine yards, right! Her foster lasted seven months. Going in, I would have thought she would have been adopted more like in seven weeks, but such is life. But it was good, all the humans shed a tear at some point yesterday. Red was an easy dog to love. She was great!

Except... She eats poop. Got the demand barking under control. The jumpy / nipping was much improved, but she never quit eating poop. She started out eating her own, but at some point decided that Sadie produced the best there ever was. I tried the meat tenderizer and all, but towards the end, picking up a Sadie poop out of the yard just became a thing of the past.

Red was so bad, that not too many weeks ago on a cold wet morning; The dogs were let out and all ran up the dew covered hill that is my back yard. Watching from the kitchen window, I saw Sadie started her circle walk and knew she was going to poop. Red knew too... She ran up behind her and I swear Red was practically snatching them out of the air as they fell the short distance to the ground. Not dressed to go out and in my bare feet, I just turned away and reminded myself not to let her lick me before lunch the next day.

Just this weekend, a similar occurrence: This time I was out cleaning the yard with the pooper-scooper in-hand. Sadie began her circle walk... Meanwhile Red and I found ourselves eying each other from opposite sides. Sadie stopped, wiped her paws, and we both rushed in eager to be first! Ha, I won!!! Red was unmercifully teased as I scooped up the grand prize.

Today I picked up the last of Red's poop... And for the first time in a while, found one from Sadie to scoop up as well.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Grunt CGC, Nov 23 7:37 pm

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