Postings by Gizmo's Family

GO!

(Page 1 of 55: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

Choosing the Right Dog > *****DO NOT BUY FROM KEYSTONE PUPPIES******
Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Tue May 6, '14 7:26pm PST 
You say you have done ‘research,’ but I’m a little skeptical. Puppy mills/pet stores (and that is mainly the type of breeder being discussed in this thread) are notorious for overcharging for their ‘product,’ especially considering the ‘quality’ of said product (since the financial aspect seems to be your only concern.)

I know where I can get a puppy for $1200 from health tested, titled parents from a breeder who has trained and worked multiple generations of their own stock, knows their lines inside and out and has a written guarantee against genetic health problems. Or I can buy a pup of the same breed for $2500 to $4500 (depending on if I buy from the mill directly or from a broker) of unknown health, no health guarantee, from generations of dogs who’ve done nothing but crank out puppies for profit (hey, as long as the breeder is making a couple bucks, who cares if they’re unhealthy, genetic nightmares or have unstable temperaments, as soon as they cash your check it’s no longer their problem.)

And sorry, while there may be some grey area and differing opinions on what constitutes an ethical breeder, I really don’t care how you try to spin it, a breeder, ANY breeder, who doesn’t do health testing is highly unethical. Period. There is no grey area there. No excuses.

Also, not sure why you feel breeders aren’t meeting the demand for dogs? Quite the opposite, we currently have too many dogs, go volunteer at a shelter and see for yourself.

For the record, I am not a breeder, and have no interest in ever becoming one. I also live in the ‘real world,’ as much as I love my dogs and I do spend a good deal of time and money on them, frankly I could NOT afford a $20,000 vet bill, that’s more than I made last year working 2 jobs. I have known people to spend that much on a terminally ill dog, and I will not judge them for it, just as I would hope no one would judge me for not being able to afford that.
[notify]
» There has since been -7 posts. Last posting by Sabi, May 7 12:52 am

Behavior & Training > need help with very dog reactive dog
Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 29, '14 8:54am PST 
Or am I asking for too much.

In a way, yes. Find the threshold where he notices another dog, but doesn’t react, and work from there. Be proactive, rather than trying to get his attention once he’s over threshold and reacting. I’ve found the exercises in this book: Control Unleashed very helpful. It’s geared towards agility dogs, but applicable to reactive dogs in general.

Also, I agree with Bunny 1000%. Don’t allow him to be loose in your yard anymore, put him on a long line or set up a kennel run. It’s not only dangerous for him, but unpleasant for other dog walkers who don’t know if your dog is friendly, or their own dog may not be friendly and may not appreciate being approached by your dog.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Opheila, Apr 29 4:05 pm


Food & Nutrition > Farmina N&D?

Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 25, '14 6:35pm PST 
Thanks guys! River, I’d love to hear how your dogs do on it once you try it. I think I’m going to get a small bag and see how that goes. Although I usually buy grain free foods, looks like I’ll have to get one of the grain-inclusive formulas for my dog with potato allergies.
[notify]
» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , May 9 7:33 am


Behavior & Training > Best Dog Training Methods?

Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 25, '14 6:26pm PST 
I suppose I’m somewhere between 1 and 3. I’ve spent 10 years training with agility people, so I’m well versed in positive reinforcement/negative punishment, and that is how I prefer to train 99% of the time. However I don’t have a problem with FAIR corrections, sometimes I think it is the simplest and most direct way to accomplish a training goal to just tell my dog what not to do (while proofing.) I do not believe it is a fair correction to set a dog up for failure and then punish them for it, or teach behaviors via positive punishment/negative reinforcement (forced retrieves, for example.)
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Kali, Apr 28 5:18 pm


Food & Nutrition > Farmina N&D?

Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 17, '14 2:52pm PST 
Since switching back to half raw/half kibble I’ve been casting around for decent kibble that doesn’t break the bank, and most importantly that my dogs do well on.

This brand came to my attention recently. It’s made by an Italian company and has been pretty widely used in Europe, and has only recently become available in the US. Currently it’s being sold in stores in the Pacific NW and through an online retailer, sounds like they have plans to expand to the rest of the US soon.

So has anyone here tried it? Any general thoughts on the food itself or the company that makes it?

Farmina Pet Foods
[notify]
» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , May 9 7:33 am

Choosing the Right Dog > I Need Pictures!
Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 17, '14 2:26pm PST 
Feel free to use any of the pictures on my pages. If you’d like higher resolution copies shoot me a PM.
[notify]
» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Clyde, May 4 7:10 pm


Behavior & Training > Sudden aggression towards roommates?

Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 17, '14 2:20pm PST 
The incident with the toy and on the couch sound like pretty typical resource guarding. The other incidents sound like a dog who is very overstimulated (i.e. barking/chasing.)

I think you have the right idea leashing him and working on reinforcing some basic obedience. For the resource guarding I would teach a ‘give’ or ‘trade’ for toys and an ‘off’ cue for furniture. Both are very useful cues and fairly straight forward to teach via positive reinforcement.

Also work on impulse control; interrupt and redirect the barking and chasing. Don’t allow it to escalate to the point of growling/nipping. How much exercise does he get daily? He is a young dog and a mix of high energy breeds (have you met many 2 or 3 year old labs? - they’re insane!laugh out loud) He needs a good outlet for that energy.

I agree with the above poster, get your roomies involved in the training. Consistency is important, so get everybody on the same page, and teach them how to handle him for when you aren’t around.

One last thought, sudden behavior changes can have a medical cause, anything from a UTI to thyroid problems. Consider a check-up with your vet.
[notify]
» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Risa W-FDM/MF RE RL1 CA CGC, Apr 18 4:44 am


Behavior & Training > Former Dogster User MISSING IN LA

Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Thu Apr 17, '14 1:15pm PST 
Oh no! I remember Lilith and Co. well. Sure hope her dog is returned safely!
[notify]
» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Cobain ADC, SGDC, CGN, Apr 24 10:49 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Jack Russell Terriers!! Please help!

Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 8, '14 6:24pm PST 
If he is able to ride a bike, even for short periods of time, he can get a bike attachment and take the dog biking. I jog and bike with my younger dog regularly, awesome way to exercise a high energy dog, I can cover twice the distance in half the time of a walk.

I agree with the NW suggestions! Is he in Sonoma Co. too? If he’s interested in pursuing classes there is a large, very active NW community here (heck, nationals are being held here next month at the fairgrounds!) Most of the people I train with are competing, but we have some ‘just for fun’ people too.

Also, would a dog walker be a possibility?
[notify]
» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Kali, Apr 9 4:24 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Having to give my dog back to the Humane Society.
Gizmo

14- Years- Young!
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 8, '14 6:01pm PST 
It’s a tough call. It can take weeks, sometimes months, for a dog to settle into a new home before you see their true personality/temperament. The behaviors you are seeing may change for the better or for the worse.

Your best bet is to work with a good trainer who can help you evaluate potential service dog prospects before you adopt them. Look for dogs that have been fostered in a home vs. a shelter setting, or a young adult dog through a good breeder who has a known history and some basic training.
[notify]
» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Gizmo, Apr 8 6:01 pm

(Page 1 of 55: Viewing entries 1 to 10)  
Page Links: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  [Last 10 entry]  

PLEASE NOTE: Due to the rapid nature of forum postings, it's quite possible our calculation of the number of ensuing forum posts may be off by one or two or more at any given moment.