Postings by Loki's Family

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Service & Therapy Dogs > Emotional Support Animal and Service Animal (CA)
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 7, '15 8:24pm PST 
King,

First off welcome to the forums. It can sometimes be really slow to get an answer as they are not as popular as they once were. Second and most important there is no official legal registration for service dogs or emotional support animals. So any of the registration sites you've seen are at best an absolute scam.

In order to qualify for an emotional support animal (or service dog) you must have a physical (or in the case of ESA's) or psychiatric condition that rises to the level of a disability.

An individual with a disability is defined by the ADA as a person who has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a person who has a history or record of such an impairment, or a person who is perceived by others as having such an impairment. The ADA does not specifically name all of the impairments that are covered.

Emotional support animals are not covered in the ADA, but persons with disabilities are granted the right under FHA to have a pet in no pet houseing, and by the ACAA to fly with ESA's as long as specific conditions are met. In order to qualify for an ESA you must be under current care by a psychiatric care doctor and they must write you a letter of prescription. This is only useful for when you are moving or seeking housing with a pet in no pet housing.

ESA's require no special training, however it would likely be a good idea for good will to have your dog pass a CGC (Canine Good Citizen) test in order to prove that your pet is well mannered and safe around people. ESA's are not granted any right to pubic access with the exception of flying. Flying with an ESA requires more specific information and a very specific letter for your treating psychiatrist.

Service dogs however are a different matter all together. You would also need the support of your doctor but in order for a dog to qualify as a service dog they must be trained to do specific tasks or work that directly mitigates your disability. Your dog would also need to be trained to a very high standard for public access and be safe in public.

For Public Access information check with ADI's website, and or IAADP's website for more specific information.

If looking to train your dog further to be a service dog I strongly recommend that you find a local trainer who is very familiar with service dog law as well as service dog training and have your dog evaluated to determine if his temperament is appropriate for work as a service dog. Service dogs must be stable around all manner of people and in all manner of situations. They must be trained to be unobtrusive in public as well as able to perform tasks/work in all of these situations.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Aug 7 8:24 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > SDs and Hotels? Need information ASAP.
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 2, '15 6:32pm PST 
If your dog is still in training though you would have to check but I don't think Florida grants public access rights (which would cover hotels) for service dogs in training except with a trainer.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 3 6:33 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > SDs and Hotels? Need information ASAP.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 2, '15 6:28pm PST 
Under federal law hotels are not required to ask for any training documents or doctors notes. They can ask you if it is a service dog required because of your disability and what tasks or work the dog is trained to do.

I would look up and carry with you the new ADA's question and answer sheet on service dogs and make sure to have the number to the DoJ handy.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 3 6:33 pm


Grooming > Hand stripping for English cocker spaniels?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 31, '15 4:38pm PST 
The coat on both breeds is stripped on the top line to set the pattern and smooth any long hair in for the show ring.

OP best advice is to hook up with your dog's breeder or talk to them about local breeder/handlers who can help you set the pattern correctly and learn to maintain it. There are a few videos on youtube on stripping an american cocker's back but the pattern is slightly different and it really is something best learned in person so that you you learn to highlight your dog's strengths and downplay your dog's faults. Grooming is an art form especially for the show ring.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Toto, CD, RN, CGC, Aug 2 7:24 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Housing Issues in Illinois Regarding my SDiT - Any Help Appreciated.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 27, '15 3:15am PST 
You may want to run this by the Pro-Boneo group on facebook, there are a lot of law experts there that likely would know better how to answer this question and get you the help you need. Sorry I can't be more help but housing law isn't really my specialty.

Cheers and good luck.

Happy and family.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 3 6:38 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Few quick questions about flyers and vests
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 27, '15 3:11am PST 
Dog capes. com is where I get all of mine.

They're fantastic sturdy quality and look professional to boot.

For patches I swear by Creative Clam though they aren't as cheap as some places.

As for flyers as of the new update I've printed out the ADA's question and answer sheet and offer to let business's copy it for their reference. They've done a fantastic job in clearing up both protections for service dog handlers as well as protections for business's. (Plus they cleared up all those pesky etiquette questions like do we have to let dogs in seats in restaurants or in carts in grocery stores)
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 6 4:44 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > I have a 12 yr old Border Collie. My MD wrote a note for me, says he was necessary.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 17, '15 4:03pm PST 
Tell that to a slew of legitimate programs that provide DAD's. Ideally no one will have just one task but legally yes Alerting is a defensible only task. It's harder to prove but there are a number of handlers who have proved it in a court of law.

There are many situations where alerting will mitigate the danger's of a disability. Seizure detection, Diabetic alert, Migraine detection. Giving a handler enough time to make themselves safe or correct a problem is very much mitigating a disability's effect.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Aug 7 3:06 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > GSD right for me?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 17, '15 4:22am PST 
Sounds like a GSD might be a good fit for your needs, but it would need to be the right GSD. Working line dogs can be a Lot of dog (I have two, one is my current SD and one is my SD prospect)

My best recommendation is to take your trainer with you to evaluate the prospect. Make sure whoever you're training with is familar with shepherds as there are some breed specific issues that can crop up in working or show line dogs that may need special attention.

I don't know what you need a service dog for but I'll give you a little bit of my experience working with the breed, and with service dog's in general.

Shepherds can make wonderful guide dogs, they're assertive and self assured (when raised and trained correctly) and capable of independent thought. They can make reasonably decent mobility dogs (both traditional and balance/brace dogs) but will tend to question orders more than your more traditional breeds (goldens/labs/poodles). If you are a handler who can stay on top of that, great they'll work well for you.

Shepherds make naturally good medical alert dogs BUT, and this is a big but they can run the risk of being over protective. If you ever feel that you'll be down and unresponsive, unable to handle the dog you need to address this with the breeder as well as with your trainer and evaluate what will happen long before this becomes an issue.

Because of the above issue shepherds rarely make good psych dogs, they tend to become too emotionally dependent on their handler, and can at times feed into handlers fears and anxieties. This can cause the dog to develop anxieties of their own, protective issues as well as just general difficulties handling.

With the right dog handler pair they can make psych dogs but it is generally not a breed I recommend for the work. Especially when dealing with PTSD, or anxiety based issues the last thing a handler needs is a dog that the public is going to naturally fear. They need a dog that puts the public at ease or attracts friendly curiosity.

Ultimately it will depend on the particular dog and that's something best decided with hands on the dog and a proper evaluation.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Annie Bannanie, Jul 17 8:13 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > I have a 12 yr old Border Collie. My MD wrote a note for me, says he was necessary.

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Jul 17, '15 4:11am PST 
Alerting Can be a legitimate task. There are hundreds of seizure alert dogs, diabetic alert dogs, and even dogs that alert to panic attacks. The clincher is training though. You can take a dog that naturally alerts to medical conditions and shape that alert and track that alert. I generally require 6 months of legitimate tracking to sign off on alerting as a trained task.

That said if you have a dog that alerts you can do more for yourself to train response behaviors as well.

A lot of dogs trained for psychiatric work can be trained for interruption style alerting, someone who has bad panic attacks, or anxiety attacks often will perform unconscious behaviors prior to said attack. With time and help a handler can track these behaviors and through faking them shape an alerting behavior so the handler can interrupt the pattern leading to a panic attack.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Aug 7 3:06 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Some confusion over rights of ESA vs SD
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 12, '15 10:37pm PST 
The difference between ESA vs SD stims from is they dog trained to do a task or work related to the disability.

Tasks would be specifically cued behaviors for the handler to help mitigate the handler's disabilities where as work is trained behaviors that are trained as 'auto' behaviors.

Anything that is alone the vein of 'it makes me feel better' or 'comforts me is emotional support and not task work. "Natural" alerts things like 'he cuddles with me when I don't feel better" doesn't fall under the course of tasks because they are not Trained.

When training dogs for myself or clients I require 80 logged hours of regular obedience training, 120 logged hours of public access specific training, and 120 logged hours of task specific training as well as a dog being able to pass my PAT as well as having passed a CGC and have at least one leg on either an AKC CD or RN title. This is obviously not required under the ADA but it is a good idea for yourself and your dog. Not to mention that under the ADA a dog Does need to remain under control and be specifically task trained.

Hope that helps a little.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 6 5:18 am

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