Postings by Clyde's Family

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Behavior & Training > Pitbull-Cockapoo pup.. behavior?
Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 12, '14 7:58am PST 
Aww, what a cutie! I love how the pup got that sweet hound look...cloud 9
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Sat 2:21 pm

Behavior & Training > Guarding my bedroom and bed...Help!
Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 12, '14 7:50am PST 
To add on to what Sophie was telling you about disciplining for guarding behavior, I would also advise having a basket of training treats on the nightstand. Any time he responds the way you want him to (for example, calmly and politely makes room for your partner in bed by huddling closer to you without any complaining or ignoring a person who walks into the room) he gets a treat and a little party. It's good to encourage good behavior, too, so you are both pushing and leading your dog in the right direction.

I resolved my mom's old chihuahua's dog bed aggression by throwing treats at him whenever I would walk near and especially if he gave me a dirty look. In about 2 months of consistent, dedicated treat-pelting, I got him to trust me enough that when I accidentally pushed him out of bed once, he just looked upset but not aggressive and got back in with a quiet harumph. I would not advise hitting your dog with treats ever I knew thw chihuahua well and had nothing to lose in our unfriendly relations with each other. But my little tale is a good illustration of how just changing the arrival of a human into an event that ends in food can help a food-crazy little dog adjust better.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Clyde, Sat 7:50 am


Behavior & Training > Pitbull-Cockapoo pup.. behavior?

Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 9, '14 11:27pm PST 
Just keep an eye out for the genetic dog aggression that sometimes surfaces in pit/mixes, especially since the heritage is a mixed bag. Also look out for a strong prey drive. Pit bulls and hounds are both prone to hunt small animals.

But 1/4 pit likely isn't going to affect the personality too much. Prey drive is the biggest risk from what I see with retriever-type, pit, and a possible hound/cur in the mix.

Those pit bulls owned by those forum people probably are ticking time bombs. Not because it's in their dna... pit bulls are small hunting mastiffs and nothing more, nothing less. It's a self-fulfilling prophecy those owners are creating and priding themselves in.

I wouldn't worry too much about your sweet little pup. Watch for DA and especially prey drive, but don't panic. smile
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by , Sat 2:21 pm


Behavior & Training > My "poor" dogs...lol.

Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 6, '14 6:51pm PST 
Jackson: It was implied the hypothetical dogs don't have behavior issues and are already under a light amount of structure. I guess I worded myself offensively. Sorry.
Clyde is mildly reactive with some dogs and I do require him to at least pay enough attention to me to respond to commands in case of a reaction/emergency/etc. I base how structured the walk is on what is going on around me and how the dogs are emotionally at the moment. I don't let them run hog-wild all the time but I "let them be dogs" too, when appropriate.
I was mainly responding to a situation where the dogs are never allotted any unstructured activity outside the house at all. I felt comparing to kids for that specific example was appropriate because I see parallels from 5-6 years of experience working with young children.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Risa W-FDM/MF RE RL1 CA CGC, Apr 8 6:22 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Rescue dogs vs Breeder (rant)

Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 6, '14 6:25pm PST 
People can be so out of touch with reality. You know what a sign of a good breeder is? They actively work to keep all their puppies out of the shelter. Good breeders contribute little, if any to the shelter population. If they don't get all unwanted dogs returned to them per their contract, said dogs are usually pulled from shelters via the breed club's foster homes. A number of said breeders will even pull and foster purebreds from shelters that weren't even bred by them or their colleagues.

In fact, I may consider looking to a breed club rescue if I ever decide to get an adult purebred dog because they will know more than anyone else about properly placing the individual dog in the ideal home. From my experience, a lot of shelters in my area are out to get as many dogs out the door as possible, home compatibility be darned.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Caledonia, Fri 4:55 pm

Behavior & Training > My "poor" dogs...lol.
Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 5, '14 9:32pm PST 
Because somehow, doing a walk that is more efficient, less stressful to the handler, and more enjoyable to the dog is inferior.

I am a crossover from dominance theory. It is so much better to let the dogs enjoy themselves.

I find the more liesurely the walk, the more tired the dogs are when distance is factored in. The process of sniffing, marking, etc. combined with reasonable expectations and discipline is extremely effective.

Dogs are like kids. You tire out kids really fast by sitting at a park and turning them loose. Structured exercise only will leave a child physically tired but still bored. And really cranky.

Poor dogs. They get mentally exercised in the most pleasant way possible. smile
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» There has since been 13 posts. Last posting by Risa W-FDM/MF RE RL1 CA CGC, Apr 8 6:22 am


Behavior & Training > Difficulty Training 3 Year Old Dog

Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Sat Apr 5, '14 9:21pm PST 
Do you know what training methods the foster home used were? Because I suspect one of two things:

1) She is wicked smart and bored to death, thus turning to mischief and disobedience to spice life up some more. She was obedient at first because the foster home exercised and stimulated her like crazy.

2) She was trained under a very dominant foster home. She came behaving well in order to avoid aversive consequences and now being under a force-free environment is going hog-wild and enjoying the lack of punishment as she gets more confident.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Clyde, Apr 5 9:21 pm


Behavior & Training > Opinion on Open Fencing

Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 31, '14 10:34am PST 
If the dogs are well-behaved, I don't mind open fencing. For example, I think our dogs would be fine provided the fence wasn't up against the sidewalk. Trouble is, most people I encounter with open fences containing dogs have the most obnoxious, dramatic, fence-fighters.

I do wish they blocked those dogs' vision because not only does it annoy the neighbors but it also makes Clyde lose his cool even while across the street from the barking dog. There are a few, such as a friendly, yet territorial pit, which I have encountered who do not have a full-blown meltdown at the sight of another living thing outside their fence. However, that relatively sane little guy is in the minority.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Onyx & Ruby, Mar 31 6:49 pm


Behavior & Training > Not sure if my doggie is Agressive Staffordshire

Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 31, '14 10:21am PST 
I'm sorry, but your grammar is a bit problematic for me.

If I understand correctly, a member of your household is grabbing at the ball when it's in the dog's mouth, then frustrating the dog by playing keep away, and then being nipped in the legs by the dog?

If that's the case, no, your dog isn't aggressive. It's frustrated because it's being antagonized. When a dog is excited and playful, it will growl and nip without any harmful intent. If you frustrate a playfully excited dog, its playful behaviors can turn angry and appear to be aggression when really the dog is starting to lose its temper.

Bully breeds have very intense emotions and it's really unwise to provoke them to anger for fun. If they are antagonized too much, they can "snap" and act aggressively because they ran out of patience. This is true for any dog, but emotional, excitable dogs like staffies can be especially sensitive.

I would suggest all provoking and antagonizing of the dog stop immediately and that you look up some impulse control games to play with the dog so it doesn't lose its temper easily. Like people, even the most patient of dogs can aggress at a person if they are bothered too much.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Twister, Apr 2 12:16 pm

Choosing the Right Dog > What Breeds in my Brother's Mixed Dog?
Clyde

Ice cubes? YES- PLEASE!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 27, '14 4:42pm PST 
I see Boston Terrier pretty clearly: thick neck, prick ears, fine-boned legs, small feet, short spine, short snout, wide skull, barrel chest, larger eyes, black color with white markings.

What's not very BT: snout is too long, ears too long, eyes too small, too large in size, to little white

If he's a BT mix, I suspect the other dog would have the following: prick/half-prick ears, long snout, longer ears, lighter bone structure, large size.

Black is usually a dominant color, so if he's half BT, it doesn't matter what color the other breed is when trying to ID breed.

The second breed could be, in that case:
German Shepherd(most likely), Collie, Catahoula Cur(my second choice), Basenji(unlikely), or Greyhound(also unlikely)


But I could also say maybe a Chihuahua/Bull Breed mix, but I feel that is less likely than Boston Terrier mix.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sachi (1997-2012), Mar 29 5:16 pm

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