Postings by Ridley's Family

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Puppy Place > Is it customary................
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 21, '14 4:18pm PST 
Registered name is just that, what the name says on paper with the AKC. It has nothing at all to do with what you call the pup! Though most breeders will require that you use their kennel name when registering.

Lots of breeds will pick a "theme"... usually just a letter ("G" little for example, all the names start with "G") or sometimes an actual theme ("summer", all the names are related to something in summer).

You can call your dog whatever you like, of course wink
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Reina, Sun 4:52 pm

Puppy Place > Hello, I'm Koby's new sister.
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 7, '14 4:21pm PST 
Hey, generalizations only go so far. If you like the parents, and it looks like they produce what you want, then that's excellent!

Of course keep us posted with lots of pictures smile
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Scruffy (RIP), Today 11:01 am


Food & Nutrition > Turkey formula

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sun Dec 7, '14 4:18pm PST 
For the last time, high protein does NOT cause ANY sort of kidney disease in dogs! How frustrating that you continue to propagate these LIES in order to plug such a sub-par brand like Hills.

For you OP, you can't hardly find a brad that gets NOTHING from China... basically all vitamin/mineral packs found in foods are sourced there. Taurine especially is almost exclusively manufactured in China (very small amount comes from Japan). So, yes, most if not all of the brands listed will have some Chinese component... yeah, even Science Diet...

That said, all of the foods listed in your original post OP are fine. Pick the one that you think your dog will do best on and roll with it... with options being limited as is, might as well go with what works.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Noah, Dec 7 8:48 pm


Puppy Place > Hello, I'm Koby's new sister.

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 6, '14 5:15pm PST 
Congrats Koby an fam smile

Which breeder did you end up going with, if you don't mind me asking?
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» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by Scruffy (RIP), Today 11:01 am


Food & Nutrition > Feeding large breed puppies adult dog food?

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Dec 6, '14 5:14pm PST 
Actually, large breed pups require VERY CAREFULLY BALANCED levels of calcium and phosphorous, not just "more" of it. Too much cal/phos has actually been shown to cause some pretty serious issues in developing pups.

Ideal levels are going to be around 1.5% calcium to around 1% phosphorous.

Puppies do not NEED less fat... how on earth does that logic make more sense. The issue with most adult foods in regards to puppies, is that they are not sufficiently energy dense, while being too high in minerals that a growing puppy shouldn't be getting.

SOME adult foods are find... some aren't. Its a matter of knowing what to look for. Something like, for example, Orijen adult would be fine for most pups (though why you would feed it and not just use the LBP, I cannot say), where as something like, lets say EVO, despite being marked as "all life stages", has WAY too much cal/phos.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Koby, Dec 7 5:22 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Advice Regarding Belgian Malinois and Tervurens
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Wed Dec 3, '14 5:51pm PST 
I'd think unless you were specifically looking to do sport work or serious training with the dog, a Terv would be the more reasonable choice.

If rescue is your desire, then honestly anything goes. A dog of any breed can produce a temperament you'd like, you just need to find that individual. And as nice as that "clean slate" is at times, for things like this, KNOWING what you will be getting 100% (as would be the case with a fully mature dog) is certainly a huge benefit. Not all rescue dogs come with unreasonable baggage.

Mals, on average, are going to be a lot more drive-y, and lot harder (temperament wise)... very much a dog who will act first, question later. Very nice learners, are capable of just about anything, but you have to have the skill to get them there... they simply aren't a "fair weather" breed or for people who tire easily of training.

Tervs, on the flip, are going to have a more manageable drive level for a pet home, a bit more sensitive which also comes with a bit more sharpness. Generally not quite as socially open as a Mal, though of course that varies from dogs and lines. Still a "training required" breed, of course, but a dog who I feel once past their most essential growth and learning periods will settle much nicer into a companion-y type environment.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Pepper, Thu 7:32 am


Food & Nutrition > Allergy to yeast, wheat, potato, beef, rabbit & rice

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Tue Nov 25, '14 8:31am PST 
This post is ancient and there was no reason to resurrect it, but since you like posting these fallacies on every post you find, Jasper,

High protein does NOT cause kidney issues in dogs. This has been disproven for YEARS and is only maintained by superstitious or negligent vets who want to plug their garbage prescription diets.
Effects of aging and dietary protein intake on uninephrectomized geriatric dogs.


In dogs, food allergies are caused by PROTEINS. ANY protein can be a potential allergen. Potato is no worse than any plant-derived protein in terms of how allergenic it is, certainly no worse than corn or soy, which is HEAVILY used in Science Diet foods.

Dogs NEED dietary fat as that is their primary source of energy. Dogs do NOT utilize carbs in the same way that people do, and studies have shown that excess of carbs, even in HIGHLY ACTIVE DOGS is actually detrimental to their performance. Once again, dogs need dietary fat, robbing them of that is not healthier for them than fat restriction/low fat diets.

The Nutritional Requirements of Exercising Dogs

Plenty of people feed raw diets to their dogs, and while I have no study to cite for this, decades worth of dogs raised on it show no WORSE affects than decades worth of dogs raised on dry diets comprised largely of cereal grains. There's no proof of anything either way, save for a limitless amount of anecdotal evidence expressing the numerous benefits of raw.

Dogs get sick and die on kibble every day. Dogs contract salmonella from kibble all the time. Dogs choke one kibble and die every day. Dogs get sick from eating kibble contaminated with all sorts of garbage like melemine and aflatoxines.

The people who push this weird agenda of "ALL KIBBLE GOOD, ALL EVERYTHING ELSE BAD" are the people who have EVERYTHING to gain from that statement.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Nov 25 8:31 am


Food & Nutrition > Canned Foods and GOLPP/Megaesophagus feeding

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 24, '14 9:13pm PST 
Jasper, please produce ONE study, one SINGLE study that definitively links high protein in the diet as the cause of kidney issues in dogs.

Because all modern research done on the topic absolutely refutes the correlation.

Only crummy vets who refuse to stay current on modern research and would rather continue to spread their outright lies to sell garbage diets like Science Diet still tout this sort of bunk.

Effects of aging and dietary protein intake on uninephrectomized geriatric dogs.

More Study Results from the Nutrition Symposium (PetMD)
Dogs with kidney problems (Dr. Lucy L. Pinkston, D.V.M.)
The Mythology of Protein Restriction for Dogs with Reduced Renal Function (Kenneth C. Bovee, DVM, MMedSc)
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Nov 24 9:13 pm


Food & Nutrition > Food for overweight puggle with allergies

Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 24, '14 9:10pm PST 
wrong thread
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Nov 24 9:10 pm

Raw Food Diet > 7 week old puppy, wanting to switch to raw
Mulder

Spooky Mulder
 
 
Barked: Sat Nov 22, '14 5:53pm PST 
7 weeks is really too young to be taking a puppy away from its littermates. I'm going to go on the assumption that you've already committed to this dog and aren't interested in a sudden change of heart, but for future thought, some of the most key socialization periods (namely the fear impact period and some social learning stages) should be experienced with their littermates and mother. Most good breeders release puppies after 8 weeks, ideal ones will wait until after 11 weeks.

I weaned my current litter of foster puppies on canned and raw. I used a pre-made grind by Primal, inclusive of bone and some organ. By 5 weeks they are eating chicken drumsticks off the bone, not quite ready to eat the bone itself. 7 weeks old they should be able to handle bone, but keep it moderate. Too much bone leads to an excess of calcium/phosphorous, which you don't want. Can also constipate them, something else you don't want. If you're going to do it, just switch, there's no point "transitioning" to raw form a garbage kibble like purina.

Videos of my (5-ish week) puppies eating raw chicken drumstick
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Pepper,Little Duke, KoaKoa, Fri 9:04 am

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