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Small Dogs > Does anyone have their small dog go on pee pads instead of outside?
Misty

I'm a lover!
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 11, '13 12:57am PST 
Ch. Ali-
Thanks for the input. It's good to know that a very small dog does not need to have piddle pads. I guess I've heard of enough people with teeny dogs using indoor litter boxes and that type of thing, that I assumed it was just something a teeny dog needed. Although I fostered a 5 lb Chi who did just fine without that. I always had big dogs before this, so I'm still getting used to being a small dog owner.

Maxie is the only dog I raised from a small puppy- and I did the same thing with the pads- just started him off on pads for a few weeks and then put the pads outside and transitioned him to just outside. He was a breeze to housebreak- but he is my perfect dog smile

So, I guess it's just a matter of individual preference, and it's good to know that there is no physiological reason a tiny dog can't hold their urine, which helps me in expectations for fosters.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Apr 15 8:07 pm

Small Dogs > Does anyone have their small dog go on pee pads instead of outside?
Misty

I'm a lover!
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 7, '13 12:47am PST 
I've never had a teeny, tiny dog- Misty is the smallest, at 14 lbs, so I don't have the experience of owning a dog who can not physically hold urine for 8 hours or so. I think if a dog has to relieve themselves every few hours, than it is kind and humane to give them an inside option. Even for someone who is home all the time, there probably will be times when you have to be away several hours....not to mention at night.

Guess if they can hold it, then it's personal preference whether you want a dog to toilet inside. I think it matters where you live too- if I lived on the 20th floor in Manhattan, I might think of using piddle pads. My dogs have a doggy door and a fenced in yard, so pottying outside is very easy here.

When I adopted Misty, she had no use for the outdoors and was convinced the bathroom rug was where she needed to go. If I took the rug up, she went on the floor where the rug was. If I closed the BR door- she went in front of the door! In her mind, that was the right thing to do.

I think she was probably trained to piddle pads in somebody's bathroom, and this business of tinkling outside was completely foreign to her. It took a little while to break this, but having 2 other dogs who are trained to go outside helped, and she is good now.

Misty wasn't sure what to do with the outdoors in general at first either- and would look back at me on our walks when Lily and Max would go plowing into a stream, or jump on a boulder, as if to say "Am I supposed to do that too?" But it didn't take long for her to realize all that was very fun... and she now romps through the snow and brush like a real dog. Funny to watch the transition- I think she was kept inside a lot before I got her. And she was from NC- where it is a bit warmer than here. Plus she had to be shaved- so being cold was probably a piece of it. Now that her coat has grown in, she loves to play in the snow.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Apr 15 8:07 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > What does it take to foster?

Misty

I'm a lover!
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 6, '13 4:49pm PST 
Fostering is a great experience- but you have to figure out how it will work for you (if it does) and what parameters you will put on it. I love many of the larger breeds, and always had big dogs until just recently, but I now have small dogs. And as much as I said they would not be treated differently..well, we definitely have small dog rules in our house that are different than big dog rules.

Sometimes I will take a larger dog while another foster for a brief time...and it is tough because the 60 lb sweet young lab mix doesn't understand that chasing the 14 lb dog along the top of the couch is not the place for her...and next thing you know both lamps on the end tables tumble to the ground..and this creates a very grumpy foster Momma! But....an older calm, big dog is a different story in my house...and works. So yes, know what works in your house and don't take on more than you can handle.

OK- that said- it's hard not to get sucked into the needs of the rescue organization once you see the roots of all this. I know every time I say no to a foster, that's one less dog we can pull from the euthanasia list. I think that is much harder to deal with than the potential of foster failures. We need to send them off so more can come, and saying "no" when your life is busy gets very hard to do once you see the grittiness of rescue. The barrage of horrible homeless dog stories never ends...we do terrible things in this country to dogs. That is something to consider as you enter this- how will you handle that? Fostering is great- but it exposes you to that world.

Foster failures....I worried about this too, as most of the dogs I have had in my life were dogs someone else didn't want and I took them in smile I have fostered 25- 30 dogs- lost track of the actual number, but it's around there. I've only kept one...and I knew before I drove home with her that she wasn't going anywhere...just had to convince my hubby.

Writing the bios- foster parents have the best input. You want to frame the bio in a way that is positive, without leaving out important information. You may want to have a more experienced person work with you in the beginning. Tell them the good, bad, and the ugly...but make sure you outline a plan where the dog will be successful. For example- continuing training, a home with another well- adjusted dog, a lively family home, etc.

I don't want to dissuade you from fostering- it is a wonderful thing- just realize that it can become complex and you have to decide how much of that you will admit into your life. I am probably the poster child for failing at this though. I said in August that I had a very busy year and I would not foster. Well, next thing you know, I have a 12 year old neglected, blind dog at my house to foster! We didn't know she was blind until she got here- but she was a sweetheart and I took her home. Unbelievably, she was adopted very quickly by a lovely family- go figure...I thought she would live out her days on my couch! Just goes to show that for every horrible story there is a wonderful one...and that is the great part of fostering dancing

Many people have given you great advice. Fostering isn't for everyone- but it is worth trying it. If nothing else- you help 1 or 2 dogs of a euthanasia list into a forever home. As a bonus, you may find it, as I have, that is one of the most wonderful things you have ever done!big grin
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Mar 6 4:49 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Dogs 101 and Designer Breeds?

Misty

I'm a lover!
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 25, '12 5:37am PST 
Tiller- appreciate the history on the cockapoo. Do you think that opened up the door for this designer trend though? I understand the behavioral issues cockers had....but did the creation of the cockapoo make people very amenable to the idea that a cross breed would be a better pet, fertilizing the ground for the designer dog trend?

That idea is now very firmly entrenched in America's psyche....and then add to it the problems some purebreds have had because of bad breeding practices, and the loss of confidence many people had in the benefits of a purebred....and this created a market niche for the "designer dog". It isn't that people woke up one day and decided "I want a chiweenie"..... but the average person looking for a dog could be swayed very easily by false claims and marketing strategies, because of the history. We are very susceptible to hype- after all, this is a country where people line up at midnight in the bitter cold on Black Friday to save fifty bucks on the latest and greatest gadget! thinking

Charlie- I'm not sure you got the point of my post and apologize if the message was not clear. I don't endorse the designer dog trend, and education is key...but I do think it is important to understand how it came to be....which is what I'm struggling to do here. With understanding, we might get an answer to the problem. Yes, education is a piece of it, and an important one, but it is a complex issue.

We all know the end result of this trend is more dogs in the shelters. All my dogs are little fluffy mixes who ARE products of this designer dog trend. Both Misty and Lily very likely were pet store impulse purchases, probably bought for a thousand bucks or more by their original owner. Fast forward less than a year, and they're on a euthanasia list at a high kill shelter. Working in rescue, this is a topic that is near and dear to my heart, as many of the fosters I have had also fall into this category. We like to throw things away in this country, and need to change that attitude toward our pets. Understanding the roots of it may prevent it from re- occurring. or re- occurring in a different way.

There is something so firmly embedded in the way we look at animals here that allows this type of thing to proliferate. This is a bit off topic, but I think looking at countries that don't have problems with homeless animals might be a good first step, like Germany, Sweden, Switzerland. What do they do differently? Also looking at areas of the US that have better control of this- what were the factors that made it change? I live in the northeast, and the homeless dog problem has greatly improved in the last several decades. Didn't used to be that way... growing up in the 60's- stray dogs used to be common, and there were all sorts of free puppies to be had. Is there more education here, or is it something else? I don't know that answer.

But even the search for this truth backfires in our press. Cesar Milan came back from Germany reporting that they have mandatory sterilization...which is totally not true. He must have misunderstood. He did do a nice report on other things Germany does right. They have virtually no stray dogs, it is against the law to euthanize a healthy dog in a shelter, people pay good money to license their dogs and there is a tax to own a dog, they rescue dogs from other countries... but there is not mandatory sterilization...unless something has changed very recently that I am not aware of. I think dogs that are adopted from shelters have to be sterilized- which is probably where he got confused. Germany actually has a very relaxed attitude toward sterilizing pets...but not the problems with homeless dogs.

So-what's up with that???? Touting mandatory spaying and neutering as the answer does not address the real problem, but speaks to our desire for a "quick fix". We have to be careful of that. Many European countries do have BSL- so things aren't perfect over there either....and I am deviating too much from the topic. But my point is- fix the underlying attitudes and many of the issues we have will go away. How to do that is the question...and probably a topic for another post! big grin
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Oct 25 5:37 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > dealing with expectations.

Maxie CGC,- TDI

Social Butterfly
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 21, '12 12:07pm PST 
When I adopted Lily, she benefited a lot by having Maxie in the house- our trainer said she needed him to teach her how to behave in a home. In fact, Maxie has been a little ambassador to numerous fosters. Glad it is working out cheer
And Kudos to you for sticking it out way to go
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , Oct 21 12:07 pm

Dog Health > Why do ppl get breeds of dogs that have bad health issues and not do anything to help it?
Misty

I'm a lover!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 21, '12 11:49am PST 
That has to be so hard- you must want to yank that dog away from the owners and then put noxious things in their eyes and ears and let them see how it feels !shock

FYI- don't know if this matters, but you have a lot of identifying information in your post (the name of the hospital, location, breed and specifics about the dog)....the world is a very small place now and could your employment be jeopardized by this owner hearing about the post and going back to the vet's office? It's a very small world out there. I'm sure all you said was true, just wanted to offer that perspective. It may not be a big deal.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by , Oct 25 7:58 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Dogs 101 and Designer Breeds?

Misty

I'm a lover!
 
 
Barked: Sun Oct 21, '12 11:24am PST 
I'm not condoning the industry behind the designer dog trend, but I think the factors that led to the development of it are worth looking at. The public in general has no idea how to determine who a good breeder is....they just want a nice, healthy dog. I'm not talking about people who seek out a dog for agility or hunting, I'm talking about the majority of pet dog owners. And I'm not saying we shouldn't educate the public, but that is an uphill battle and won't happen overnight.

Over the last several decades, so many purebreds have developed a host of genetic health issues. Many are due to irresponsible breeding by puppy mills churning out dogs for profit, a similar thing to what we see now with the "designer" breeds. However, I think another factor to consider is the irresponsible manner the dog fancy has sanctioned the breeding of over- exaggerated traits for some breeds.

Given both these factors, it is little wonder that John and Jane Q Public developed the idea that a purebred dog means you have a dog with health problems. The market was ripe for the development of a cute "designer dog" that didn't have health problems because the puppies are a "cross breed". Again, I'm not agreeing with the premise, but I hear it all the time from folks when I do adoption contracts.... "mixed breeds are healthier". It is VERY difficult to change attitudes....and given the state of affairs in the dog world, there is a grain of truth to it. Bottom line- it won't be an idea that dies anytime soon.

Look at the horrendous brachycephalism in Pugs, Shih Tzus, Bulldogs....what godly purpose does that serve? What about the sloping hips in GSDs? Do sloping hips help in Schutzhund work? I really don't know the answer to that, as I am no expert in Schutzhund, but it almost seems the opposite would be better. My grandfather bred GSDs in Germany many years ago for protection, and I didn't see any sloping hips. The massive folds in the mastiffs that lead them to develop a host of skin problems? Is there a purpose that can't be served with less exaggeration? There are numerous examples, as we well know. None of these were in the breed's best interest, but breeders with dogs with these traits were rewarded in the show circuit, so we got more of them. Many "elite" breeders were not looking out for the best interests of the breed.

I think a Pug or a Shih Tzu with a nose that is 1 inch longer would still be really adorable...and that really is the purpose of these breeds. In fact, being adorable, healthy, cute, and friendly is really the only purpose of a lot of pet dogs...and what people want. It is little wonder that the Pug/Beagle mix has become so popular. I have fostered 3 "puggles" and none of them had the breathing issues of the Pug, and were all great little dogs....but my son's purebred Pug has all sorts of health issues and a snore that shakes the rafters! That's not cute; it means he's not getting enough oxygen.

I support reliable breeding without question...but I don't see the designer dog trend going away anytime soon. There is a market demand for it, and it might be best for the dog world to provide humane parameters for the public to expect from folks that engage in this practice...for the dogs' sakes. Like....limiting the amount of dogs and breeds in one kennel, restricting the number of litters, providing veterinarian care, etc. But- we haven't been able to adequately police that in any arena, purebred or not. I don't know the answer here, it's an enormous debate with no one "right" answer, and speaks more to the acceptance our society has for animal cruelty.
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» There has since been 43 posts. Last posting by , Oct 25 5:37 am


Dog Health > Anyone have a distemper survivor? (long)

Maxie CGC,- TDI

Social Butterfly
 
 
Barked: Thu Oct 11, '12 3:51am PST 
We had a dog who was a distemper survivor- but we did not have him as a young pup. He was my friend's dog and we adopted him at age 5 when she took a job that involved traveling a lot. He was a golden retriever. He did well, but had a lot of digestive issues (loose stools, reflux)- no neuro problems. I don't know if the digestive problems were a result of the distemper. His teeth were fine. He lived to be 11- good dog. This was a while ago- he died in 1988.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Sep 26 10:47 am


Grooming > How much do you pay?

Maxie CGC,- TDI

Social Butterfly
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 29, '12 4:26am PST 
Yes- I realized that when I started grooming my dogs- groomers earn their money... and then some! I actually like doing my dogs-But they certainly are not as polished as when a pro does them...
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Oct 2 9:31 am

Behavior & Training > Reactive Dog Support Thread
Lily Anne

Let's play!
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 29, '12 3:35am PST 
Lily has issues on leash- and Ophelia, it's the same thing, soon as you click on the leash, she becomes mini Cujo shock

I started out with good positive training techniques, desensitizing- used Patricia MConnell's book Fiesty Fido- and was making progress, but slowly. Then in the spring, she seemed to be worse (probably because we slacked off in the winter) and I was having a hard time coordinating a time for the trainer I regularly use to come and re-evaluate her.

So I called someone else and she showed up with a Martingale collar and a spiel about how the prior training made her dependent on food and it was better to use leash corrections. She actually wanted to use a prong- but I said no to that. But...I thought what I'm doing isn't working so let me hear this out. She showed me the technique, and I did give it a go- and initially there was much more control, but I couldn't get past having to constantly correct- and I hated doing it cry And she never stopped the lunging- I was just able to rein her in earlier, but couldn't stand the sound of her voice being choked off by the collar.

Now maybe I didn't really buy into it, and that's why it didn't work, but I have gone back to my original techniques but have added the use of a clicker. I think it was Archer's video I watched that inspired me. So....we are now making really good progress, and I think both of us are happier now smile

The other day, a woman was walking toward us and she came over to talk to me and petted Lily, and Lily was soooo good.... and the woman remarked how she could just tell what a happy dog she was the whole time she was walking toward us. Totally validated that what I am doing now is right- it just takes so darn long to see progress!
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» There has since been 20 posts. Last posting by , Mar 22 11:18 pm

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