Postings by Happy's Family

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Grooming > Recommend a everyday brush?
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Wed Jul 23, '14 9:14pm PST 
Actually for a short double coated dog like you have a rubber curry is one of the better options. It also doubles as a scrub brush when you wash your dog allowing you to get a better clean. Slicker's run the same risk as a furmanator of scratching and irritating the skin. For shedding season, depending on the length of coat you might look into either a rake or a mars coat king, which while designed for terrier coats work well for getting out undercoat safely
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Jul 23 9:14 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Mobility service dog options
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 19, '14 6:18am PST 
First off I apologize I did mean to get to this sooner but not surprisingly Dogster has been giving me trouble.

That said, welcome to the boards, or what is left of them at least, and congratulations on getting as far as you have with your first dog. Looking at your issues I can easily see why you would be looking for a larger breed however I think you're completely aiming in the wrong direction with the breed selection. Hang in there with me because I get the appeal. I Have worked all three breeds you mentioned, as well as other high energy breeds, and as a whole the three you've picked would be ill suited for the kind of service work you would need. There is a far cry of difference between high energy, and high energy of mal's and Dutch shepherds.

They are both awesome breeds but they've been bred to nearly have no off switch which means on bad mobility days they would be crawling out of their skin (and driving you out of yours).

I always recommend to look for a dog that can hang with you on your worst day, when conditioned (which a mobility dog needs to be) they can keep up with you on your best.

While I know you aren't looking at shepherds, if you're interested I know of a litter due this summer or fall that would be great for service work from lines that are known for producing smaller 50-70lbs dogs. They are working line dogs so not low energy by any means, both parents are active in herding as well as other sports. The breeder has produced service dogs from her lines before, even mobility dogs so she has an idea the kind of temperament to look for. If you looked for a female you'd be on the smaller end of that range.

Now I know you didn't mention them but if you're looking for a dog that can go out and do things with you but still be a great service dog I would also add labs and golden's to your list. Well bred they are going to be well within your range, and have the added bonus of being well recognized as a service dog by the public. If you're interested I can give you the names of a few breeders who are well used to producing nice well bred dogs that are healthy and have a history of producing dogs that do all manner of service work for several programs.


Of the three breeds you listed the one I would first consider as service dog material is the dutch shepherd, but very Very few breeders will breed for the type of dog that you need to do the work, that will be stable and easy going around the public, not protective, as well as laid back enough to work reliably for you. I can really only name one or two off the top of my head.

My point with that is that it is just as, if not more important to make sure you find the right breeder as it is the breed. Even within breeds there is a wide range of breeders who breed for different types of work, and temperament. Service work is very different from protection work, or herding.

As for the mobility portion of things, I highly recommend that you get in touch with a good trainer, while you can train most everything it is always better to have a second set of eyes, and be willing to listen if they have anything to say (I agree that the trainer you talked to would obviously not be a good idea) Doing mobility training on your own can be very dangerous and it is very easy to cause serious harm not only to your dog but yourself when done incorrectly. Very least I can hook you up with some other handlers and trainers through facebook that could help you along on your journey.

If you'd like me to give you the names of any breeders or help you find groups/trainers to help with training just shoot me an email. My email addy is listed on Happy's Profile page.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 7 4:20 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Can this be fixed?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Mon Jul 7, '14 6:03am PST 
Any answer you get on here is going to be an educated guess at best. You really need to find an experienced service dog trainer to do a full evaluation on your dog. They will be able to tell you if this can be fixed or if this is going to be a deal breaking issue.

My educated opinion is that this could go both ways. It really depends on how bad the fears are and what they're for. Part of what you're describing sounds like separation anxiety.. and that will need to be worked on if you plan to keep this dog, service dog or no service dog.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 3 2:45 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Service dog | blue pitbull | XXL Pitbull

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Jun 29, '14 8:27pm PST 
In order to have a service dog a handler has to have a disability and the dog must be trained to mitigate that disability. While ADA doesn't prohibit protection training with service dogs the Rehab act and ACAA does prohibit it.

I think what you're asking is about Therapy dog program which is where you take your dog to visit people in hospitals, nursing rooms or other things (the definition of a therapy dog is a dog that helps people other than their handler) A therapy dog has no public access rights, and is only allowed in specific places where they're working at the permission of the building (hospitals, schools, nursing homes Not general places)

If you want to get into Tharapy dog work then contact either Pet Partners or Therapy dogs International in order to find out where close to you they have classes and testing.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Aug 23 4:44 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Training Mobility Dog

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Wed Apr 30, '14 7:02pm PST 
Candidate is a huge thing. A mobility dog should be at least 40 percent of the handler's height and 50 percent of their weight and not less than 60lbs regardless of handler's size. A dog needs to be fully mature before starting mobility work, which means after growth plates close which is generally between 18-24 months in most breeds. This varies from breed to breed and even from one blood line to the next in some breeds. Before starting mobility work you want to have the dog evaluated by an orthopedic vet for conformation and have hips and elbows x-rayed and evaluated preferably by OFA (minimum) to insure there are not any joint instabilities.

Equipment is super important for a mobility service dog to insure that a dog is able to safely do the work, it sounds like your mom is going to need a specialized harness for the best ability to the work. I don't say this because I want you guys to have to spend a lot of money but I do see handlers using equipment that isn't safe and that can hurt both dog and handler.

As for training I always teach a mobility dog to work slightly ahead of traditional heel position, with the dog's shoulder even or barely ahead of your hip. Make sure when you do classes that you explain to the instructor that the dog is in training for service work and even if they don't understand the specifics they can help you fine tune things. If you don't already I would find a trainer in your area who is familiar with service work. It will greatly improve your chance of success. Take their advice to heart, they aren't being mean they just want to help you get your dog(s) to the standard that they should be.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by Breezy CGC-PAT Program Trained, Oct 7 3:15 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Vest for medical dog
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Tue Apr 15, '14 7:17pm PST 
Didn't the program that trained your dog give you a vest?
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, May 25 1:50 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Want service dog and have very limited options/resources, help!

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 11, '14 11:45pm PST 
Guest, having just a short look at the 'program' ( I hesitate to call it that) that you linked I wouldn't advise anyone to get near it with a 50 foot pole. Not only is their site an absolute nightmare of misspelled words, miss mashed sentences and horrible grammar but they have a very poor understanding of dog behavior and training shown by their information.

I hope the dog you have is well trained but I have serious doubts on the abilities of these people to correctly train a dog.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, May 25 7:02 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Disabled Vet / needs therapy dog

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Apr 11, '14 11:35pm PST 
Bobby and Silas are right, what you are looking for is a service dog, not a Therapy dog.

The difference is that a service dog is individually trained to do work or tasks for a disabled individual. A therapy dog is trained to bring comfort and joy to someone other than their handler. The handler's of service dogs have public access rights while the handler's of therapy dogs do not.

As for programs that will help vets there are a Lot of them out there. If you could give me an idea what part of the country you are in I might could give you better leads but first thing I'd do is check with your doctor to make sure they are in support of you using a service dog since most programs require information from your doctor.

In the mean time you could look here, put in PTSD as the type and your state and you should pull up a number of programs that train dogs for PTSD some local and some national. Feel free to ask questions about any programs you think look promising.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by SIR AILBE, Service Dog, May 13 12:46 am


Behavior & Training > My dog has aggression towards other dogs.?

Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Sun Feb 23, '14 12:11am PST 
Honestly?

Some dogs are not going to like other dogs. I can't tell if there is something triggering without having seen his former interactions but this isn't very uncommon in dogs that have been taken to dog parks from a young age.

Dog parks are full of rude, badly behaved dogs who don't know proper communication skills. If your dog is one who just isn't crazy about other dogs and never has been (which seems to be the case) then just respect his wishes and don't take him to the dog park. Look into other activities that you can get your dog into that you both will enjoy.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Happy, Feb 23 12:11 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > Difference between an emotional service dog and a pet?
Happy

The Boy Wonder
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 7, '14 3:16pm PST 
Bunny, to address your question, a dog being an ESA under the law is only covered if the owner is disabled (or in some cases the elderly) and their treating psychiatrist feels that a pet would be a benefit to their patient. Then they could apply to their landlord for reasonable accommodation, there is really only one reason that a person can be denied reasonable accommodation, and that is if the breed of dog they have/are looking at is denied by the owners insurance policy.

Caledonia, no matter what those groups say a ESA is still not a service animal. A service dog must be specifically task trained as per the ADA in order to be granted public access rights with their handler.

From the newest revision/clarification found Here

"Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA."
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Silas, Feb 8 2:04 pm

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