Postings by Lucy's Family

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Service & Therapy Dogs > New SDIT
Lucy

Life is supposed- to be fun!
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 31, '15 10:23pm PST 
Most dogs are helped by being able to see out. Just like us, if what they see matches what they feel, they tend to not get motion sick. Being inside a car without being able to see out goofs up the inner ear perception. Ginger can help if given 30 minutes before. Tiring the pup out may helps as well so they are more relaxed.

Other dogs do better being covered in a crate.

Try these, drive short distances then get out for a walk. Get back in and drive home.
Many dogs outgrow it.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lucy, Jan 31 10:23 pm

Behavior & Training > Begging
Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Sat Jan 31, '15 10:15pm PST 
Teach him to go mat and place the mat where it is convenient for you. Only feed him on the mat.

Conversely, put him under the table where you cannot see him looking at you.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Jessie, Jan 31 10:15 pm


Behavior & Training > Names that Sound too Similar

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 27, '15 8:20pm PST 
It's usually a good idea to change a dog's name when they change homes. Some say it leaves behind any baggage the dog may have. My current two have similar names and wish I would have changed one of them. Jessie & Lucy sounds very similar when spoken loud or fast. I constantly get both dogs coming when I only want one. For example going through a door, I want one to stay and one to come etc. I have to point to them most times to get who I want. My previous dogs had two very different sounding names and we didn't have this issue.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Reina, Feb 10 4:21 am


Behavior & Training > Dog afraid of cell phones?

Lucy

Life is supposed- to be fun!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 3:27pm PST 
Without knowing much about her past history, we can only guess. Some breed mixes tend to become sound sensitive. This in not uncommon in BC mixes.
Has she ever been on a e-fence? Many dogs that have been become afraid of sounds as they may be a warning of something that might scare or hurt the dog. Lucy developed a fear of our cell phone battery beep after we had her a couple of years. Initially, she also was afraid of the clicker (That was easily overcome)and our electronic air filter if if zapped.
I'd first rule out hearing issues at the vet, then start a program of counter conditioning to the specific issues is helpful. Having white noise in the background can often be helpful to cover some background or lower level sounds that scare her.
Lucy's thunderstorm phobia was helped by a visit to the chiropractic vet. Not 100% but much improved.
Avoid training that involves correction as sensitive dogs are more sensitive and you may unknowingly give a correction that is too harsh and causes fear instead of learning. Timing is very important in this.
Otherwise, if is helpful to learn dog body language so you can read the more subtle communication before she goes into fear mode. On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals by Turid Rugass is a good place to start.

Good luck!
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lucy, Jan 26 3:27 pm


Puppy Place > Socializing a puppy

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 3:14pm PST 
Here is a great checklist of things that a puppy needs to be exposed to before she turns 12 weeks old if you want her to be a well-rounded bomb proof dog in public and for life.

http://drsophiayin.com/images/uploads/ce/Socialization_Checklist .pdf
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Sassy, Jan 28 9:37 pm

Behavior & Training > Training Gone Wrong
Lucy

Life is supposed- to be fun!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 3:12pm PST 
The best thing you can do is to regain her trust. You do that incrementally. Look into clicker training. While you teach her, you will learn the theory behind training dogs.
Key points are to manage unwanted behavior (don't put her into situations where she can practice the unwanted behavior).
Retrain more desired behaviors. (Give her something specific in a situation)
Then when you have taught the behaviors to a high enough distraction level, start reintroducing her to the trigger environment at a distance.
Look into approaches called systematic desensitization and counter conditioning.
Behavior Adjustment Training with Grisha Stewart is another good one to check out.
In your case since she shut down after punishment, I would highly recommend a trainer that has experience and success using positive reinforcement.

Kikopup has a great channel on youtube to show you what clicker training is about. Facebook also has many great groups for this.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lucy, Jan 26 3:12 pm


Behavior & Training > Really clingy it's getting annoying

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 3:04pm PST 
Clingy is common in newly rehomed dogs. it can take some dogs 6 mos or longer to adjust to a new home. If you start to see other behaviors that may indicate he is anxious when left alone (such as barking, scratching, peeing, destroying things) look into 'separation anxiety'. A good positive reinforcement trainer can help you work through it in increments that won't stress the dog out.
Good luck!
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Odin, Jan 26 6:15 pm


Behavior & Training > Hard to Predict Around Other Dogs

Lucy

Life is supposed- to be fun!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 3:00pm PST 
Learning dog language is a great start. Check out Turid Rugaas little book "On Talking Terms with Dogs: Calming Signals" Most altercations start with much more subtle signs that the dogs use to prevent interactions such as head turns, lip licks, arc approaches etc. These all communicate that one dog may need more space. If the other dog ignores these, everything escalates until one dog will tell the other off.

Usually arousal level (excitement) plays a role in fights like this as well. It's all good until it's not. Kind of like kids playing until they get into a fight. Your job is to supervise and interrupt play periodically so the dogs never get to the level where it breaks into a fight. That will also help him learn how to keep focus on you and respond every time.

If you are on Facebook, you can check out a group called "Observation Skills for Training Dogs"

Good luck.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Bandit, Jan 26 3:26 pm


Raw Food Diet > Dog pooping too much

Jessie

Miss- Congeniality &- Adaptable
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 2:53pm PST 
It's hard to say without more details. How much are you feeding? 2-3% of his ideal body weight. If so, that should be the correct range assuming he is an average level of energy dog. How much fat are you feeding? More can cause him to need to eliminate more frequently.
If he is gaining weight, it means he's getting too much. Too much bone will add volume as it is the form of fibre the raw fed dogs get.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Ginger, Jan 26 4:19 pm

Sports & Agility > Learning Body Awareness for sports
Lucy

Life is supposed- to be fun!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 26, '15 2:43pm PST 
Do you have a klutsy dog? Need to strengthen various parts of your dog's body? Want to learn those fancy heeling turns in formal obedience? Targeting is the best way to start a dog learning where her body is in space and how to best move it. Results in fast, precise movements. Learn all this and more with your dog in your own living room!
6 week course starts Feb 1, 2015

http://youtu.be/D_3DRIf3dIc
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Lucy, Jan 26 2:43 pm

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