Postings by Reagan's Family

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Dog Health > So.....How cold is it where you are?
Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 5, '14 6:47pm PST 
13 degrees here with a windchill in the single digits. Not anywhere near -30 below, but very chilly for Texas! The woofers are LOVING it though.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Kali earned her wings 10/21/14, Jan 9 5:13 pm

Behavior & Training > Would a wolfdog at a dog park be a cause for concern?
Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 18, '13 7:45am PST 
No problem. smile

Ignorance is only a part of the issue, lol. Being ignorant to something because you honestly don't know and are interested in learning more about it even if you don't agree (or at least respecting the people that do have experience/knowledge on the subject) is one thing. Acting like a 5 year old that didn't get his way at the candy store is another. So thank you for replying with civility!

Haha, I meant several people did talk her INTO giving him up to an experienced home! She should not have that animal for multiple reasons. :/

And yes, she does not have proper containment, she was having issues with him being very food aggressive- which can happen to ANY canine, but is often a bit more exaggerated in wolfdogs and should be corrected when they are puppies. I still hand feed Wilbur at a year old and he is great with his raw meaties!

I am glad he didn't cause issues there. While I don't agree with some of the others posts about never taking them out in public- etc- I do agree that in this particular case, the owner is placing her animal into a bad situation and is exactly the type of person that gives responsible wolfdogs owners a bad name.

Wolfdogs need A LOT of exercise and I have no qualms with people taking their wolfdogs- whether they are low or high content- to dog park to stretch their legs if they are well behaved. But that should not be their only means of enrichment. Providing the critters with a large enclosure and daily mentally and physically stimulating games and interaction is important, and should be considered a priority with any active canine! Many times behavioral issues with these guys stem from lack of training, poor socialization and a bored woofer!

There is a small dog park by my house but it's for the community residents only. The other dog parks are much further away in the Houston area or just outside. I know of a couple of wolfdog owners closer to town that frequent the dog parks around Houston on a regular basis- their animals are very well trained/socialized and they have never had an issue with people or dogs there. In fact they have made several curious friends that have been impressed with how well behaved their wolfdogs are, lol. applause
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by Pepper, Jun 22 11:15 pm


Behavior & Training > Would a wolfdog at a dog park be a cause for concern?

Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 18, '13 5:14am PST 
I am sure Mulder will be thrilled that I am posting. wave

The animal in question is a wolfdog and like dog breeders, there are not so good ones of wolfdog breeders. He was sold to her without proper containment and no previous wolfdog experience. Several responsible owners in the wolfdog community (WDC) at one point did talk her out of giving the animal up and into an experienced home, and then things fell thru (on her part). In the dog park people's defense- he should not be at a dog park, mostly because of his OWNER, not because of what he is.

I don't expect anyone else that has posted here, by the tone this thread has progressed in, to understand why people choose to own wolfdogs. Not all of them are for selfish macho/popularity reasons.

Decisions should be based on the indivdual canines, not by their "breed" or type. But of course, that's just me.

shrug
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Pepper, Jun 22 11:15 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > You shouldn't get a _____ if ______.

Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Thu Jun 6, '13 7:25am PST 
You shouldn't get a wolfdog if...well take what Ember said about Siberians and add...if...

You don't have the time, space or money to build a proper/secure enclosure.
You can't dedicate a great deal of your time to intense socialization and training.
You can't afford to feed an all raw diet, or at the very least, a very high quality, grain free kibble.
You value the way your yard, house, car and any other personal items look.
You enjoy going on vacation whenever you please.
You don't like a dog that rolls in the nastiest (and sometimes the funniest) things imaginable.
You want a dog that will be trustworthy, full time in the house.
You don't have a sense of humor!!!


wink
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» There has since been 27 posts. Last posting by Arya, Jul 7 9:29 am


Dog Health > Should a dog be sedated for a BNT ointment pack and ear flush?

Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Sun Apr 21, '13 2:50pm PST 
Honestly it depends on the dog and the severity of the infection. Usually packing means it's pretty bad (vs just a regular topical ointment). Probably about 1/2 of our dogs at work that get an ear flush AND packing have to be sedated, mostly because of the time spent doing it and because of how painful/sensitive their ears are, even just flushing them out.

If he freaked out the first time, chances are he will probably freak out the next time as well- unless he was just extra sensitive because he just got neutered.

Hope this helps and hope he gets to feeling better.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Wilbur, Apr 21 2:50 pm

Native American Indian Dog > could owners of NAIDs please reply?
Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Thu Mar 28, '13 3:31pm PST 
Unfortunately most of the information is true. Most of the dogs from Karen Markels lines are a poorly (and I mean POORLY) bred mess mix of GSD, husky, Malamute and who the heck knows what else! I would say the only story that is still up in the air is when she got rid of all of her higher content wolfdogs- did she breed her lower contents into the lines of the NAIDS.

As far as temperament goes, it's a craps shoot with them. Some end up to be good dogs with temperaments similar to that of northern breeds, given a lot of socialization and work and others- well lets just say there is no shortage of them in rescue. Most of the NAIDS that have ended up in rescue, ended up there due to behavioral issues, some workable and some severe enough to warrant them "sanctuary" type animals only.

And as far as hypoallergenic goes. Lets look into this for a minute. She is mixing GSD's, Huskies, Malamutes and the like together- NONE of which are hypoallergenic animals. NO...they are not hypoallergenic!

confused

IMO the NAID is just another designer dog breed that was created with no concern for health or temperament- only bred to look wolfy and sell for big bucks.

I do hope he puppy you get is a happy and healthy baby! Good luck.
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» There has since been 12 posts. Last posting by , May 11 7:29 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Hoping to adopt a wolfdog

Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 27, '13 8:02pm PST 
Here is my upper mid doing his meet and greet at Huntsville State Park and at the Texas Wildlife and Woodland Expo that was held on March 23rd.



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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Milton, Mar 29 10:54 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Hoping to adopt a wolfdog

Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Wed Mar 27, '13 7:58pm PST 
I see you said you were looking into adopting. smile There are many good wolfdogs that are in need of homes thru different rescue organizations.

I adopted my first wolfdog (a mid content) when I was 15. He was an assisted rescue thru the Texas Alaskan Malamute Rescue (he can be seen under Monty in their year 2000 happy tails section). I lived in a regular house at the time.

He was a bit of a challenge, but adjusted o living indoors full time pretty well. If you know what you are getting into and are willing to make the adjustments, then go for it. Especially if you are looking to ADOPT, the rescues know how to fit animals into different homes that meet their needs. I know of many mid contents that do well in full time home settings, just as I know many that do not. You would probably be better off starting with a low content- but you never know, you might get lucky. Just don't be dissapointed if you don't.

My first wolfdog was a great ambassador animal. He came to parks wih me, PetsMart and traveled the county- tagging along to my road trips to New Mexico, Colorado and Kentucky.

A foster of mine who I transported up to Ohio was a blackphase upper mid that does educational/ambassador work, as well as model/photography work.

I have 3 wolfdogs of my own now, 2 of which are rescues. A low content Mal mix that is great in the house, a mid content that does require containment and an upper mid that is good in the house and comes to educational seminars and outings with me- acting as an ambassador wolfdog for Saint Francis Wolf Sacntuary.

My point is- are they for everyone. Absolutely not. Can they be good animals if you take the time to prepare, do your research, be able to provide the necessary needs for the animal and understand what you are getting yourself into? Yes, yes they can. smile




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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Milton, Mar 29 10:54 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Help! Driving with Pit Bull mix through BSL state.

Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 21, '13 8:12am PST 
I travel a lot with my wolfdogs and some of my trips have taken me thru illegal areas. I have made it a point to always carry their rabies certificates with me that state they are Alaskan Malamutes (for my boys) and German Shepherd (for my girl). Being well versed in dog traits vs wolf traits and my guys being wolfDOG crosses- they have enough dog traits to slap anyone that wants to argue with me in the face. wink
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Wilbur, Feb 21 8:12 am

Dog Health > 5 month old Chihuahua starts treatment (mitaban dip)
Wilbur

Can I bite your- toes?
 
 
Barked: Wed Feb 20, '13 8:32pm PST 
It is not unusual for puppies (especially small breed) to be lethargic (and sometimes even have vomiting) after having a Mitaban dip. Mitaban dips can be done at full strength (which is usually a 10.6ml bottle to 2 gallons of water), double strength (10.6ml bottle to 1 gallon water) or 1/2 strength (5.3mls Mitaban to 2 gallopns water- which is the preferred strength for small/sensitive dogs). Many times if we get in a very sensitive dog at work, we will lengthen the tiem in between dips as well as cutting the stength AND shortening the time the dip is done (the pet should be dipped for about 20 minutes and then allowed to completely air dry, unless it is a very sensitive dog).
Ask your vet what strength they are dipping your baby at and for how long. Also make sure htey are checking the temperature of your baby every 10-15 minutes.
Ivermectin can also be used to replace to Mitaban- but as a couple others have said, should be used with caution as some dogs (especially merles) can be VERY sensitive to ivermectin.
Hope your baby gets to feeling better. hugfrown
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Neva Blew Sky, Feb 22 4:31 am

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