Postings by Hotchner's Family

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Behavior & Training > Separation-related inappropriate barking.
Firefly- **Adopted**

1284861
 
 
Barked: Thu Feb 14, '13 4:41am PST 
I am fostering a puppy who has had a bit of a rough time. At 8 weeks, she and her siblings were dumped at my workplace, and she was the only one nobody in the store adopted that day. I found her a home a few weeks later only to have her returned when the new owners got an unexpected job offer out of state. Then her best buddy, one of my older foster puppies, was adopted out.

All of this has somehow caused her to latch onto me to a ridiculous degree. How ridiculous? The second I leave her line of sight, she barks relentlessly, sometimes for hours. It doesn't matter if she has enrichment toys in her playpen, if other people are in the room, if she's been fed and watered... constant barking.

I'm perplexed as to what caused this, as I work most of the day so she SHOULD be attached to my husband, if anyone. I do not acknowledge her when she barks like this, nor do I come back into the room to stop it; I try to let it stop or at least PAUSE on its own before I do, in fact. Either way, the second I enter the room, even if I do not so much as glance her way, she goes silent and calm.

She has figured out that I get up at 4am every morning and has started barking at 3:30, even though she doesn't have to go potty at that time. It's driving my husband up the wall and I'm about there, too.

Any advice?
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Zoe, Feb 16 3:04 pm

Food & Nutrition > Toxic Dog Treats from China
Hotchner

1181233
 
 
Barked: Tue May 1, '12 9:16am PST 
Big thanks to the above poster for the ACCURATE information. Point blank, the chicken treats have been extensively tested by the FDA and they are not finding a specific contaminant to blame, nor has a recall been issued. They are simply warning the public due to the complaints received, not stating that the treats are in any way "poisoned."

I've spoken to my vet about this and share his opinion on the matter after what I've observed working retail at a pet supply store. In fact, there is little mystery to me as to what is going on when I see how much and how often people feed them to their dogs.

These treats are literally an entire chicken breast dehydrated down into strips, and preserved with vegetable glycerin - a hygroscopic molecule. This means two things: they are a very high protein food minus the moisture content that would accompany a raw feeding, and they absorb moisture. Even for a carnivore, high protein low moisture = stressed kidneys - and while the average dog would do fine having a piece of one of these treats daily, that ISN'T how people are feeding them. Recently, the owner of a bichon confided in me that he goes through a full 30oz package of the treats a WEEK - a week!

Treats fed as treats - that is, a small, occasional reward - are by and large harmless. But when people dole out half a jerk strip a dozen times a day, there are definitely risks involved. Personally, I'll reserve my judgement and avoid panicking until I see some concrete evidence in the form of a) an identified toxic compound verified in the treats via testing by the FDA and/or b) a peer-reviewed research study in a veterinary journal. Meanwhile, I'll just keep doing what I've always done: avoid wasting my money on overpriced overseas jerky and keep feeding my dogs straight up fresh meat when I want to spoil them.
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» There has since been 21 posts. Last posting by , Feb 26 12:12 am


Food & Nutrition > Orijen too rich Acana better?

Boris

1181243
 
 
Barked: Tue May 1, '12 8:59am PST 
From what I've heard, Orijen is best suited to active and working dogs, whereas Acana is great for average-activity dogs.

They're both wonderful quality foods, but point blank, a working border collie has different needs than a couch-lounging pug, just like an athelete's dietary needs are different than someone who works in an office. The same basic requirements for survival are there, but if you sit behind a computer all day, you're going to react adversely to eating the same level of protein a body builder does. About the same goes for dogs.

I find that people stress the importance of an ancestral diet in dogs but not of an ancestral lifestyle to go along with it; for some dogs, it's really too rich to be on a food like Orijen.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Kashmir ♥ CGC, May 30 8:15 am


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > Too difficult and time consuming to rescue or adopt

Hotchner

1181233
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 12, '12 6:29am PST 
I've never really found rescues to be overly picky. I'm not sure there is much of an "overly picky" when it comes to ensuring the quality, life-long care of a living being. Yes, they do ask a lot of questions to determine the living situation and owner's dog-knowledge. Yes, they often require home and vet checks. This doesn't really seem like much to me, and I have a funny feeling that if people who SELL dogs did the same kind of background-checking, there wouldn't be so many dogs in shelters today.

It is possible, of course, that I appreciate stringency seeing that since moving to Alabama, I have witnessed a stray crisis of ridiculous magnitude, as well as a pervasive owner irresponsibility; the two very much go hand in hand. I have already fostered and placed 3 cats and 4 dogs out of pocket since moving down here that were found just in my yard or on my commute. It gets old, fast, and you can bet I carefully screened any adopters so they wouldn't wind up back in that situation.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Bianca CGC TT HIC Thd ♥, Apr 10 1:49 am


Behavior & Training > Separation Anxiety: What am I doing wrong?

Banshee

Foxbear/Banshee- Hybrid!
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 5, '12 3:09am PST 
I will start by saying two things: one, I have never dealt with separation anxiety before, so I'm hoping someone can help point me the right way as I'm clearly doing something wrong and two, I do not accept dominance theory, so while I respect your right to believe it, please do not bother giving advice based on this training philosophy.

Now, onwards to the problem: our foster puppy Banshee seems to have separation anxiety that is very me-specific. My husband is home most of the day and she generally accepts his comings and goings gracefully. I work 10 hour days with an hour commute each way, so I pretty much see her first thing in the morning and then again in the evening. I make it a point to not make a big deal of leaving or coming home, generally go about my business before I greet any of the dogs.

Banshee, however, has decided that my not being within her sights is The End of the World. She will destroy everything in her playpen, marathon-scream, make frantic efforts to escape, etc. There is a reason her name is Banshee - she lives up to being a screeching demon.

As an example, when I went to bed last night, before my husband? She screamed for about a half hour straight and kept climbing out of her playpen to come scratch at the bedroom door. Similarly, when I tried to mop the hallway yesterday and put up a gate to keep her out, she took to wild, frantic screaming, trying to climb the gate, and finally trying to go UNDER the gate, which resulted in her getting thoroughly wedged. Right now, as I'm in the other room typing this, she is howling her little head off.

I do not give her attention, positive or negative, when she pulls this behavior. I will not acknowledge her until she is quiet and mannerly, the one exception being that if she escapes her playpen, I do have to put her back in it - but even then, I try to wait until she's been roaming around a bit so that she doesn't come to think, "climbing out = attention!"

She has plenty of toys - PLENTY - and we take her for regular walks, let her play with our other puppy Harley, etc. so she shouldn't be bored. But I'm very worried that this behavior is going to affect her adoption outcome, and I'm especially concerned that it seems to be a ME problem! So please tell me where I'm going wrong, as I want to nip this in the bud. We've had good luck reducing her resource guarding behavior, so I'm hoping we can address this as well.
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by Mr. Jake the Beagle, Mar 10 1:19 am

Food & Nutrition > Taste of the Wild
Banshee

Foxbear/Banshee- Hybrid!
 
 
Barked: Fri Feb 24, '12 7:26pm PST 
I think TOTW is excellent quality for the money, and while I can't quite afford it for all of my dogs, I use it whenever I have a puppy or an animal needing additional nutritional support in the house and I'm VERY pleased with the results. Shiny coats, solid poos, good weights all around - not to mention you don't need to feed much since it is calorie dense. It did wonders for a heartworm+ stray we fostered; she was plenty fat when found but had a ton of hair loss and very bad skin, and simply being on a good quality food really helped her skin and coat. I would definitely recommend this food.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Sandy Baby ♥, Feb 29 6:34 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Does this bother anyone else?

Boris

1181243
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 14, '12 9:21am PST 
Incidentally, BOB rough collie? Came from a blind and deaf double blue merle stud. If that doesn't say something about how ridiculous conformation dog breeding has gotten in terms of irresponsible proliferation of lousy genetics, I don't know what does: http://www.astraean.com/borderwars/2012/02/westminster-rewards-cruel ty.html
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» There has since been 23 posts. Last posting by Dogster HQ, Feb 14 3:39 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Ridiculous...

Penny

Ball? Ball?- BALL???
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 14, '12 7:54am PST 
*Shields eyes* Augh, the layout, the clip art, the formatting! Mid-90's internet called; it wants its everything back.

Ahem. Now that I have that out of my system... I really, really don't see why anyone needs to be making more labs unless they're producing AMAZING specimens with stellar health and temperaments, and bloodlines that collapse under the weight of all their titles - preferably ones including some manner of working. And I really don't see why a yellow lab should ever cost that much money unless it poops gold, cooks culinary-grade meals, and cleans the house when it isn't busy fighting crime and curing cancer. They're a great breed, don't get me wrong. I could just go get about seven today if I went to a few local shelters.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by Lucille, Feb 15 12:54 pm


Rescue, Adoption & Happy Endings > How to screen adopters?

Banshee

Foxbear/Banshee- Hybrid!
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 14, '12 7:25am PST 
IME, Open-ended questions are hugely important when screening adopters, because they give you more to work with. I have an adoption questionaire that granted is more for small pets/exotics/fish than dogs, and the types of questions you will see are, "Describe what you expect your daily care routine will be." I see this as preferable to, "Do you understand the care needs of x?" because it's easy to say "yes" but not actually have a clear idea. Many people have completely skewed expectations of the care, behavior, etc. of dogs of a given breed, age, or just in general. The more info the better.

Questions about current/former pets are useful and revealing but can also be fudged. I know many of the rescues down here want to know, for example, if you've ever had a pet run away, be hit by a car, etc. These are all useful, but nothing verifiable, so don't rely on them alone. Respect an honest explanation of a mistake over someone who gives you evasive answers and excuses; someone who owns the responsibility that they goofed up and left the gate open earns more credit in my book than someone who makes a million excuses for why it wasn't their fault.

I also strongly agree with asking for vet references, and if they're a first time pet owner, asking which vet they intend to use. An adoption agreement isn't a bad idea either.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by The Hounds of Bassetville +3, Feb 17 8:41 am

Choosing the Right Dog > Does this bother anyone else?
Boris

1181243
 
 
Barked: Tue Feb 14, '12 7:08am PST 
The breeding of any animal in which appearence is the predominant concern rather than soundness, functionality, and health is abhorrent. This isn't something that just the dog world is afflicted by, sadly.
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» There has since been 28 posts. Last posting by Dogster HQ, Feb 14 3:39 pm

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