Postings by My Family

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Service & Therapy Dogs > Tasks
Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Dec 18, '12 2:58pm PST 
"The task I'm talking about teaching at the moment (Grounding) would just simply be whenever I get trapped in a train of thought that's leading bad ways, I can signal to her to paw at me so that I have something to focus on other than my thoughts which snaps me out of it."

You can't be serious. If you have enough self-awareness to cue your dog to paw your arm when you're engaged in negative thoughts, then you have enough self-awareness to skip the dog and initiate the healthy coping skills right off.
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» There has since been 8 posts. Last posting by , Jan 3 3:14 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Psychiatric Service Dog certification
Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Mon Nov 5, '12 5:37pm PST 
What a scam. They charge you $50 "administrative" fee to order the ID package you can order yourself from Petjoy for free. That's rich.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Nov 19 8:56 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > emotional support sevice dog

Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Thu Nov 1, '12 8:05am PST 
The 3-task standard comes from Assistance Dogs International minimum training standards, developed by their standards and ethics committee. To to receive and maintain accreditation through ADI, programs must train service dogs to reliably perform a minimum of 3 tasks, and additionally, the new handler must receive sufficient training and demonstrate the ability to utilize those 3 tasks to mitigate their disability. Since accreditation is voluntary programs and doesn't exist at all for private or owner trainers, the level of training a service dog receives really comes down to the ethics and standards of the individual trainer.

Where the ADA is concerned, one would think the repeated and persistent use of the plural form of "tasks" in the language of the law would be enough to make it clear that training a single task doesn't pass muster with the ADA either. But, the ADA seem to be the vortex of the universe, where normal sensibilities cease to exist, so until the DOJ issues official guidance on the "work and tasks" topics, they will continue to be an ongoing argument among interested parties.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Nov 1 1:00 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Two SDs OK?

Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Sat Oct 20, '12 1:18am PST 
"It doesn't matter if he doesn't exactly need two. He could just be trying to socialize both of them at the same time - so that he can switch between them later on. He can have as many service animals as he wishes legally (maybe not taking them all out at once unless necessary, of course), as long as the animal performs a task that assists him."

Uh.. no, hon. You've got that so very wrong.

1) The law offers NO protection whatsoever to a person who is "just trying to socialize" an animal. There is an enormous difference between socializing an animal and training a service animal; people who don't understand that difference have no business training service animals.

2) The ADA and accompanying state laws require public accommodations make reasonable accommodations for people with disabilities, including allowing the presence of a service animal or, in some instances, a service animal in training. These laws are not a free pass for people with disabilities to do what ever they want, where ever they want, when ever they want.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by , Oct 21 8:35 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Advice on working w/o gear

Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 26, '12 2:00pm PST 
I hate working Onyx nekkid. Hate, hate, hate.

I don't usually choose to work him nekkid, but more than once I've gone out expecting only to go to pet friendly places, off duty, and then realize I need to stop somewhere else and didn't have a vest. It never ends well. confused

I "borrowed" the idea behind this Badge Holder from Active Dogs and made one similar and put a regular service dog/do not pet patch on it. I also fixed the velcro so that it stays up on the back of the collar, to make it more visible. I keep it in my glove box, so that I always have it with me and can pull it out if I'm vestless for any reason.

"Honestly, if anyone needs a custom mobility harness, do not walk, run...to [Sam]!"

Absolutely, positively agree!
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» There has since been 7 posts. Last posting by , Oct 4 11:07 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > First access challenge with new SDiT
Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Sep 18, '12 1:11am PST 
"So, you're saying that if someone has a known disability they can get away with breaking the law as written. Sorry, but no."

Ditto.
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» There has since been 6 posts. Last posting by , Sep 18 6:37 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > First access challenge with new SDiT

Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 12, '12 7:33am PST 
I'd be interested in the details of any court ruling that supports acting in direct violation of the law.

I don't believe a lawyer would directly advise anyone to break the law or take advantage of legal loopholes either. However, it's not unheard of for a lawyer to comment in generalities about how much or little attention a particular offense might receive, and then for an individual to choose whether to commit the offense based on the estimated risk versus the perceived benefit.

Texas law is quite clear on when dog's in training are protected and if you claim to meet that criteria when you don't actually, you are breaking. the. law.
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by , Sep 18 6:37 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > First access challenge with new SDiT

Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 10, '12 4:21pm PST 
Bobby, that may be how people are currently manipulating and twisting the law to get away with doing what they want, but it's not what the law actually says.

I was going on memory before, because I didn't have time to look it up, but I made time.

http://www.statutes.legis.state.tx.us/Docs/HR/htm/HR.121.htm#121 .003

From Sec. 121.003.

"(i) An assistance animal in training shall not be denied admittance to any public facility when accompanied by an approved trainer who is an agent of an organization generally recognized by agencies involved in the rehabilitation of persons who are disabled as reputable and competent to provide training for assistance animals, and/or their handlers."

That is not a definition that includes owner-trainers, or even private trainers who claim to have the ability to train a service dog.
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» There has since been 16 posts. Last posting by , Sep 18 6:37 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > First access challenge with new SDiT

Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 7, '12 11:36pm PST 
I recall correctly, Texas law only allows access to SDITs when they're accompanied by a qualified trainer from a recognized organization, so even if a person chooses to OT under the supervision of a service dog trainer, they can only train in non-pet friendly locations at times when the trainer physically accompanies them and the dog.
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» There has since been 18 posts. Last posting by , Sep 18 6:37 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > What the ADA says about service dogs
Onyx, SD

Legitimate- Mobility Dog
 
 
Barked: Tue Aug 28, '12 3:06pm PST 
What about § 35.104 and § 35.136?
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Aug 28 3:36 pm

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