Postings by Hoyt's Family

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Behavior & Training > LLW and jumping videos...
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Mon Mar 10, '14 3:17pm PST 
I've got a friend with a Newfie who could use some help in the loose leash walking and jumping departments. He's over a year but under two if I remember right, so a tank and completely full of vim and vinegar.

Local trainers are all dominance/corrective collar/force based and I'd hate to see her take that route, especially because she has young children and runs a daycare. The dog seems good natured, otherwise, just needs a bit of catch up in the manners dept.

I could have sworn I've seen loads of great videos listed here before but it's been some time since I last visited. I have no idea where to even begin looking and search brings up everything *but* something I can offer her in the way of a visual. Looking for positive reinforcement based only, brownie points for videos or tips that address size as a hurdle.

Hope everyone's been well smile
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Tiller (Skansen's Ira in the M, Mar 10 8:28 pm

Behavior & Training > We NEED a more reliable recall... asap
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 21, '13 6:46am PST 
Noah, it's not lazy to respect what a dog is inherently driven to do.

Just as I would never get a pug and expect that it learn bitework and how to retrieve a duck out of a pond, I would never get an Arctic breed and expect it to have a flawless recall. Heck, forget flawless. Regardless of any training I did I wouldn't expect it to have much of a recall at all.

Now I could strap an ecollar on my pug to MAKE him retrieve that duck but why? And for what?? Just to say I can? How would my dog view my efforts?

I *could* strap an ecollar on a Bloodhound and "correct" him for snooting out critters to curb his tendency to stray after them and inconvenience me.......but WHY???

I suppose there are a lot of people who don't give a rip how their dog feels. About what makes them tick, and keeps them happy. I'm not going to apologize for the fact that I do. I don't have dogs to make them do things that they're both not going to understand, and not going to enjoy. I mold what's there to build our partnership.

Forcing an Artctic breed to perfect a recall he doesn't have established would never be ok in my book.

I have a Miniature Pinscher that when I got him I accepted that he may never have a decent recall. I worked it within reason and by the grace of God alone he was one of those wonky individuals that doesn't fit the mold. He responds flawlessly (at least in that realm) with gusto, to every single "here" command I give. The key phrase there is within reason. Strapping an ecollar on a breed who is well known to struggle in the recall department. Who is stubborn. Hardheaded in every way. Feisty as all get out......there just was zero purpose to go that far for no good reason. It would have made him learn to hate me at best, and broken his spirit at worst

How a dog is going to respond to a tool, or particular training method, is far more important than a humans selfish desire to conquer the animals inherent tendencies. Allow it to be what it is. Don't force it into a situation just because you, as the one with the power, can.


Don't preach to me as if I'm some sort of ecollar hater either. I use them regularly, on particular breeds when it's appropriate and to proof for things far more concerning than convenience or clout.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by Dr. Watson, Sep 24 9:02 am


Behavior & Training > We NEED a more reliable recall... asap

Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 21, '13 6:38am PST 
Nare, you nailed the "just because you can doesn't mean you should, nor should you automatically expect fitting a round peg in a square hole, to work." way to go
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» There has since been 10 posts. Last posting by Dr. Watson, Sep 24 9:02 am


Behavior & Training > We NEED a more reliable recall... asap

Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Sat Sep 21, '13 6:10am PST 
Noah, it's not lazy to respect what a dog is inherently driven to do.

Just as I would never get a pug and expect that it learn bitework and how to retrieve a duck out of a pond, I would never get an Arctic breed and expect it to have a flawless recall. Heck, forget flawless. Regardless of any training I did I wouldn't expect it to have much of a recall at all.

Now I could strap an ecollar on my pug to MAKE him retrieve that duck but why? And for what?? Just to say I can? How would my dog view my efforts?

I *could* strap an ecollar on a Bloodhound and "correct" him for snooting out critters to curb his tendency to stray after them and inconvenience me.......but WHY???

I suppose there are a lot of people who don't give a rip how their dog feels. About what makes them tick, and keeps them happy. I'm not going to apologize for the fact that I do. I don't have dogs to make them do things that they're both not going to understand, and not going to enjoy. I mold what's there to build our partnership.

Forcing an Artctic breed to perfect a recall he doesn't have established would never be ok in my book.

I have a Miniature Pinscher that when I got him I accepted that he may never have a decent recall. I worked it within reason and by the grace of God alone he was one of those wonky individuals that doesn't fit the mold. He responds flawlessly (at least in that realm) with gusto, to every single "here" command I give. The key phrase there is within reason. Strapping an ecollar on a breed who is well known to struggle in the recall department. Who is stubborn. Hardheaded in every way. Feisty as all get out......there just was zero purpose to go that far for no good reason. It would have made him learn to hate me at best, and broken his spirit at worst

How a dog is going to respond to a tool, or particular training method, is far more important than a humans selfish desire to conquer the animals inherent tendencies. Allow it to be what it is. Don't force it into a situation just because you, as the one with the power, can.


Don't preach to me as if I'm some sort of ecollar hater either. I use them regularly, on particular breeds when it's appropriate and to proof for things far more concerning than convenience or clout.
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» There has since been 11 posts. Last posting by Dr. Watson, Sep 24 9:02 am


Behavior & Training > Dog dog aggression! HELP!

Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 20, '13 8:48am PST 
What breed?

What age?

Spayed?

History? Where did you get the dog from and when?

What sort of training have you done? Socializing? Tools/methods used to approach both aspects?

What exactly are you experiencing as far as dog to dog aggression goes?

How did you initially respond and what did you do to try to remedy the problem?

What sort of credentials did the trainer you consulted have?

What did the trainer advise you do?

What was the response of the dog when you tried what the trainer suggested?
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by Trigger, Sep 20 8:48 am

Behavior & Training > We NEED a more reliable recall... asap
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Fri Sep 20, '13 7:47am PST 
Arctic breeds typically have thick coats, hard heads, low desire to please and high pain tolerances.

An ecollar would most certainly not work.


It is definitely a breed trait, and one that most times cannot be trained out. The screaming and chasing undoubtedly only made things worse. Do your best to prevent a next time by gating off access to the front door when it is open. If you have to, put the others in another room before you open the door and keep a leash attached to collar before you own the door to attach the chain to the collar. Don't unhook the leash until the chain is clipped on. Put up signs on your doors that visiting family and friends knock first and then give you a moment to contain the dogs before opening the door.

If even after all that they happen to get out again (which really, they shouldn't be able to), try luring them with favorite toys or have a stash of hotdogs available throw their way. Keep calm and your tone low, calm and friendly.
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» There has since been 20 posts. Last posting by Dr. Watson, Sep 24 9:02 am


Choosing the Right Dog > Breed guesses now that he's older

Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Mon Sep 16, '13 5:32pm PST 
German Shepherd/Collie

Side profile looks Miniature Pinscher to me.
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» There has since been 21 posts. Last posting by UCH Onyx TT, CGC, Sep 22 1:00 pm


Choosing the Right Dog > Neverest labs?

Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Thu Sep 12, '13 6:22am PST 
"Pretty much agree with you all... LOVE the pedigrees and the health clearances, believe she is doing way too many litters and only breeding to produce puppies and, while the "normal" price for a good, health cleared lab IS $1500+ here on the East Coast, I cannot agree with her prices, especially the part about boarding after 8 weeks. And, finally, one of MY pet peeves...THREE vaccines before 7 weeks of age??? WTF???? Talk about messing up an immune system. Honestly, it appears to me that she may have started out on the right track years ago but has now given in to the lure of a fast buck. The only current showing appears to be via UKC, and there don't appear to be any current titles on the back end of the names."


I noticed the UKC bit too and am assuming most people would see the C and just assume it was an across the board title. My ignorance is showing in that realm, is there a difference between achieving such a title through UKC standards vs AKC standards?

Wondering too what you think of her (near compulsory) c section "policy?" I've never heard of Labs having trouble with whelping even enormous sized litters, is there really a medical need for it? I understand with certain breeds it's necessary often times, buy have you EVER heard of such a thing with Labs? I can't imagine it's safe to keep breeding a bitch who has had multiple multiple c sections, and it's evident she does bree..... them at least once a year .....you'd think that would make breeding more dangerous, no?
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by Mulder, Nov 17 6:57 am


Dog Health > Sudden weight gain that isn't visible - cause for concern?

Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 5:58pm PST 
Any chance it's just muscle?

My guys always weigh most in the fall because that's when they're worked the hardest. Muscle weighs more than fat and although I can clearly see the definition ramp up when they're wet I wouldn't notice the change other than what the scale says.

It would be highly unlikely a dog could grow and carry a 5-10lb tumor and you not be able to see or feel it, or have the dog suffering to a point where it would be obvious.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by Nare, Sep 11 6:04 pm

Dog Health > Sudden weight gain that isn't visible - cause for concern?
Trigger

*Blackdog*
 
 
Barked: Wed Sep 11, '13 5:53pm PST 
Any chance it's just muscle?

My guys always weigh most in the fall because that's when they're worked the hardest. Muscle weighs more than fat and although I can clearly see the definition ramp up when they're wet I wouldn't notice the change other than what the scale says.

It would be highly unlikely a dog could grow and carry a 5-10lb tumor and you not be able to see or feel it, or have the dog suffering to a point where it would be obvious.
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» There has since been 3 posts. Last posting by Nare, Sep 11 6:04 pm

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