Postings by John's Family

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Service & Therapy Dogs > Question about dogs for seizure disability
John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Wed Jan 18, '12 2:23pm PST 
No you can't train a dog to alert to a neurological disorder, they either will or they won't. We have no idea what the dogs are detecting and alerting to so there is no way to train a dog to recognize them.

You can encourage alerting through post episode reward but you can't teach a dog how to recognize an oncoming seizure that's something they have to pick up on their own. The only thing that can be trained into a dog is response to the seizure and then you hope the dog will eventually develop the ability to alert.


Here's a piece of advice you can give your friend RUN AWAY from any trainer or organization that says they can train a dog to detect and alert to seizures. They are liars and frauds and should not be trusted with a penny. She should begin researching programs in and around her area she should also look into fundraising options if she feels she will be unable to afford the fees related to a program. There are lots of options out there to gather donations.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by Josephine , Jan 18 3:13 pm

Service & Therapy Dogs > Behaviour that can be trained out or problem?
John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Mon Jan 16, '12 11:05pm PST 
I think your relationship with your pup and your confidence level would be greatly helped if you signed her up for some basic obedience classes.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Jan 17 9:31 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Behaviour that can be trained out or problem?

John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 15, '12 7:23pm PST 
How easy is it to redirect her if she wants to sniff or sing to the cats. A SD doesn't have to be serious all the time they just need to be willing and happy to go into serious mode to do their job.

If she is still willing to listen to you despite a delicious smell or playful cat then I don't see her play behavior being a problem at all.
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» There has since been 9 posts. Last posting by , Jan 17 9:31 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > I have a question? ( still very new to all of this)

John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 8, '12 9:38pm PST 
You might also consider taking a taxi if you find one that has a policy that allows pets in their cabs.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , Jan 10 12:22 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > New person-best breeds for south/hot service dog work

John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Tue Jan 3, '12 1:47am PST 
Pitties also are VERY people oriented dogs that have the structure for hotter climates.
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» There has since been 32 posts. Last posting by , Jan 17 10:11 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > Will it be impossible for me to try to train this puppy as a service dog for my Son's autism
John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 3:19pm PST 
"I'm a little perplexed as to why I am getting parenting advice for a child I already receive multiple professional therapies and expert opinions on who seem to think I am doing a fine job in a pet forum dedicated to serving special needs"

... because you specifically asked for such advise regarding the training of a service dog for your son, who is too young to make such a decision for himself... that's a parenting decision... so per your request you're getting advise on that.

Those experts might be amazingly knowledgeable in their particular field but there are very very few medical professionals that have the first clue about service dogs. I would not be surprised at all to find that none of the medical professionals you are seeing even know the definition of a service dog, or by what definition a person is considered disabled and eligible to acquire one. Here on this forum are several people who could be considered experts in service dogs, it would be foolish to disregard them simply because of the medium they are transmitting their knowledge through. After all you yourself did ask for their advice.

When you ask a question on a public forum not everyone is going to give you the response you wanted to hear, we're going to give you our opinions the things you asked for. We may not have the same ideas about this issue but we are all looking towards the same goal, for you to have a happy family and a happy dog.

If you're feeling threatened by a particular line of text first step back and try to read it without inferring tone into it. A post that was written to be helpful could be interpreted as hostile if you throw your own ideas about it's tone over it. I know that's hard to do some times, especially when you are just trying to get your feet on the ground regarding an issue. But the people on here are very helpful and truly do have the best intentions at heart.
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» There has since been 30 posts. Last posting by Ginger, Feb 6 8:00 am


Service & Therapy Dogs > Where to find inexpensive backpacks.

John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 3:02pm PST 
OM NOM double post
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» There has since been 14 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Jan 16 1:05 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Where to find inexpensive backpacks.

John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 2:48pm PST 
Here is a very recent thread on choosing working gear.
http://www.dogster.com/forums/Service_and_Therapy_Dogs/thread /730367

You can also try looking for used SD gear at "SD Gear Trading Post" on FB or the yahoo group "Recycled Service Dog Equipment".
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» There has since been 15 posts. Last posting by Crazy Sadie Lady, Jan 16 1:05 pm


Service & Therapy Dogs > Will it be impossible for me to try to train this puppy as a service dog for my Son's autism

John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 3:02am PST 
To add on to what Albie said, you should only be bringing this puppy into stores that are pet friendly (no grocery stores/restaurants/places that sell food). Currently he is only a service dog "candidate" and by law can only be socialized in pet friendly places. Bringing a puppy into a non-pet friendly business is potentially detrimental to your pup, your future relationships and access issues with these businesses, and other SD teams that will visit these stores after you. If you want to socialize your puppy when he is this young he should be placed in a sling or other carrying device (not in the basket of a cart) and only taken out for short visits at the max no more than 10-15mins so his exposures will be short and positive. You will need to check your state's laws to infer if you have access rights as a independent non-disabled trainer before taking him into non-pet-friendly stores.

Honestly I do not think relying upon a dog to track down your child is a reliable safety net. A dog cannot track a child who has been pulled into a van, or down a 2 story drop. It is too easy for a child to get into serious trouble by the time you have collected yourself the dog has picked up his trail. I think your time and money would be better spent investing in the many technologies that are available to better secure your house and to keep 24/7 tabs on your son.

There may be other ways that your pup can be beneficial for your son but if I were a parent of an autistic child I would use another method to keep track of them, a system that does not have off days, does not get sick or injured and does not get potentially stressed or burned out. I think finding him in the house will be a good help for you and a good game for your pup but I would work on proofing my house so even if he does bolt it's only to another room or under a bed.

Another thing to consider is a service dog requires care, upkeep, and time similar to the demands of a toddler. You have to keep an animal known for loving all things dirty and smelly impeccably clean, well fed, well rested, and entertained(physical and mental exercise). You have to keep their clothes impeccably clean and in good working order. You have to carry around supplies they may need while you are out, poo bags, paper towels, wet wipes, a small first aid kit, a brush, etc. You have to buckle or crate them in the car, unbuckle them, and put their gear on. Watch out for them at all times to keep them from breaking training, getting pestered by Joe Public getting stepped on by Joe Public. Plan your trips and outings around their needs and be prepared to drop everything and head home if they are having an off day, get sick or injured.

It's a lot of work to be partnered with a service dog, and in some cases the benefits outweigh all those set backs but if you think that other methods could be substituted for the work you would want this dog to do I would advise you utilize them as they are more thank likely much less intensive than carting around another small furry toddler with you all day every day.

Enjoy your new puppy but please be careful with him he's still a baby baby and prone to several puppy brain relapses and fear stages. Above all make any learning very fun and brief for him in whatever you decide to train him in.
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» There has since been 39 posts. Last posting by Ginger, Feb 6 8:00 am

Service & Therapy Dogs > New person-best breeds for south/hot service dog work
John

Sqeuaky?
 
 
Barked: Sun Jan 1, '12 2:10am PST 
If you don't mind the grooming upkeep poodles are very people oriented dogs and I know of several people who have them as PSDs.
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» There has since been 47 posts. Last posting by , Jan 17 10:11 am

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