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Behavior & Training > The Trainer Search...
Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 7, '13 6:40pm PST 
If it's been a week or more since you emailed, email again.

I'm not going to lie, there are moments where I get absolutely inundated with emails and I read them, then reply to them in order of 'importance' (current students are always priority)... and sometimes emails get lost in teh shuffle.. i TRY to go through once a week and make sure I have replied to all emails but it's not a perfect system.

PERSONALLY, if someone emails more than once, assuming it's not daily and angry, i'm never upset or bothered. I take it as they are very interested and if their first email fell through the cracks, I make sure the second doesn't.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jul 15 11:02 am

Behavior & Training > The Trainer Search...
Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 7, '13 5:15pm PST 
Make sure you check your spam folders for the trainer's response. I know that I have sent clients emails that got filtered as spam... so they thought I didn't respond when I did indeed email them.

If you are really interested in the trainers, email again or call them.
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» There has since been 4 posts. Last posting by , Jul 15 11:02 am


Behavior & Training > From "The Dog Snobs", this one made me laugh...it's Callie

Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Tue Jun 11, '13 8:15pm PST 
Also reminder The Dog Snobs is a bit of an 'adult' blog in terms of their language and topics... though i love them to death!
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , Jun 13 10:28 am


Behavior & Training > Puppy behavior with an oversized puppy

Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Mon Jun 3, '13 6:49am PST 
leash biting can be a symptom of some larger anxiety issues. I've seen dogs who are anxious or stressed latch on to leashes--they are trying to release some of that anxiety by chewing or tugging (depending on the dog).

if he's not gnawing on the leash (more just gripping and/or pulling) you can use a 2 leash system, as soon as he puts one in his mouth you drop it (so there is no reinforcement and pick up the secondary leash (attaching it to a rear hook harness can be helpful since it's harder for them to turn back to bite that leash), once they drop the normal leash, pick it back up and keep going.

You can also, while NOT on a walk, work impulse control around not biting the leash. I couldn't find a video that is exactly what I do but this one is pretty similar Puppy Leash Biting .

I do foundation work with a boring leash (still) and a boring situation but I work up to a very exciting leash in a highly aroused situation... I may eventually, after lots of training, get the dog tugging with tug toy and get them amped up and then present the leash sort of as a toy and click/treat for not going after the leash. After a lots of success of the dog not biting leash during these set ups, i start the work on walks with C/T when I can see the dog THINKING about doing it and choosing not to do it or during situations where it used to happen (like in front a particular house that has two barking dogs in the yard). If there are particular places/times when the leash biting happens more than others, i make sure to work in those places as well.

Once I have done all of that work and I absolutely know the dog has had a very long history of reinforcement for not biting the leash, even in extreme situations, in the most challenging environments, or stressful situations, I will start using some punishment--bite the leash = down and parked for a few seconds. By this point, the bites shoudl be EXTREMELY rare.... if they aren't rare, I go bac a few steps because I didn't do the work right or I missed a trigger for the leash biting.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , Jun 4 2:22 am


Behavior & Training > How Much for a Private Lesson

Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Thu May 23, '13 6:05am PST 
Definitely contact her/him and have a phone conversation or email asking all the questions you want about methods and his/her background.

I've never seen pricing like that but it's certainly reasonable for hour lessons (especially since follow up lessons are only $50).

The price for a trainer varies extremely widely depending on your area. In my area a skilled trainer often charges somewhere between $65-$95 a lesson (or hourly if that's how they charge). I've seen certified behavior consultants up to $115/lesson. Some trainers will offer packages of lessons at a lower per-lesson fee for prepaying for groups of lessons (quantity discounts so to speak).
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , May 23 8:28 am

Behavior & Training > Muzzles
Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Wed May 15, '13 7:06pm PST 
I would have to say that the 'protectiveness' that you see is probably all based in fear and that is a bit concerning that you are reinforcing this fear-based aggressive display... there is serious potential for dangerous happenings.

THAT BEING SAID, my favorite basket muzzle for dogs who don't have a long history of serious bites, is the Baskerville Ultra muzzle. Both of my dogs have been conditioned to ENJOY wearing their muzzles (neither are aggressive or need it but on the off-chance something ever happens were they need to wear one, both are comfortable with them on).

The baskerville is light weight, comfortable and has the optional head strap to prevent it from being pulled off. You can find it in this store in the second row I think

Here's a video showing How to teach your dog to like wearing a muzzle

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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , May 15 7:06 pm


Food & Nutrition > Instant Goat's Milk

Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Sat May 11, '13 6:56pm PST 
My pups get raw goats milk frequently and I think it's great but I'm not sure this would be the same thing because it's dehydrated ... i think it would have to be pasteurized to dehydrate.

It SOUNDS like they are adding probiotics to the goats milk... raw goats milk simply has lots of probiotics in it naturally. The solubility of added probiotics may be different than the raw that has natural probiotics in it. There are also lots of other benefits to raw goats milk but i'm not sure the instant goats milk would have any of these.
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» There has since been 0 posts. Last posting by , May 11 6:56 pm


Behavior & Training > DAP collars and plug ins?

Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Thu May 9, '13 6:13pm PST 
They either work or they don't. Some dogs respond in big ways and others don't.

I had suggested it to a client for an anxious dog in their home (they had 3 dogs total)... it didn't do much for the anxious dog I suggested it for but one of their dogs who is seriously thunder phobic slept through a thunderstorm for the first time in her life after they started using the plug in and sprays.

It's a product I suggest a lot because it's not THAT expensive and it can't HURT the situation so it will either help or make no big changes.
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» There has since been 1 post. Last posting by , May 11 6:31 pm


Behavior & Training > Dog boot camp or other options

Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Wed May 1, '13 6:52pm PST 
I'm sorry, i'm going to have to seriously disagree. Medications, when they are warranted, can be extremely beneficial and make huge differences int he lives of dogs and their humans. Not all medications will work on a given dog (just like not all medications work for humans) and some dogs won't show changes on a medication (if a dog doesn't have a serotonin issue and is given an SSRI, they probably won't show much change).

Even within the same drug class, some dogs are helped by some drugs and not others (a dog may show no change with Fluoxe-tine but may have drastic change with Sertraline). Sometimes you have to try an entirely different class of drugs to find one that addresses the issues (or more than one)--maybe the dog needs a Benzodiazepine and an SSRI.

It's also not about popp'n pills... there is a lot of work that often goes along with medication. Medication gets the dog in a mental place where learning can happen.

A vet can prescribe these meds, but a veterinary behaviorist (board certified) or a vet that is VERY well versed in behavior mod and psychopharmaceuticals can help really customize and guide a dog/handler to find the RIGHT most effective medication or cocktail available.

Meds are not always the answer and they are certainly not right for every dog, in every situation...but to say they don't work in general is absolutely inaccurate.
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» There has since been 2 posts. Last posting by , May 2 2:49 am

Behavior & Training > Dog boot camp or other options
Shayne CGC,- RL2

Shayne- Disc Doggin in- the 'Burgh!
 
 
Barked: Wed May 1, '13 8:42am PST 
Like Mulder said, boot camp is probably not going to fix your problems. They will not be able to work on separation anxiety at all since the training will not be happening in your home where the problem occurs nor will it involve you. Plus, like Mulder said, there are serious risks involved with many of the "boot camp" programs because you have no idea what they are doing to your dog. Just last year a "well respected" trainer in OH killed 1 boot camp dog and 4 more were pulled from his property emaciated and near death.

I would try to find a board certified veterinary behaviorist ( Click here to search). If your dog is on high doses of prozac and clomipramine and you aren't seeing results, it's probably not the right medication or the right mix or the right dosage or may not be addressing the root problem. A board certified veterinary behaviorist will be able to help you make sure the behaviors are not being caused by some sort of underlying medical condition and then will be able to help find the right medication, dosage, or mix of medications to help reduce the behavior problems you are seeing while also giving sound training advice. With complicated cases, it's not just about prescribing medications... it's about finding the right dosage, finding the RIGHT medications, and really documenting the process so you know what's working and what's not--not all dogs will respond to clomipramine... not all respond to prozac.... there are a lot of other safe medications that one can try to help reduce separation anxiety (once a medical cause of the behavior has been ruled out).

There is a crate that I have personally seen used twice for dogs with extreme SA. Dogs who destroyed crate after crate after crate (airline, metal wire, metal wire crate rigged using zip ties, metal ties, caribeeners, etc). For one dog it worked wonderfully, the other dog was so anxious that he hurt himself trying to escape by rubbing his nose completely raw trying to bend bars/doors (though he was unable to escape) so the owners stopped using it because they were concerned for his safety. Clicky link for the crate. It's not cheap but it saved the life of the dog who had destroyed crate after crate (while on medications)... they were considering rehoming/euthanizing him because they didn't know what else they could do but the crate keeps him contained and he has learned he can't escape so he just relaxes.

(totally off topic, it's annoying that dogster doesn't allow the generic name for prozac... i spent 30 minutes trying to figure out what word in my post could POSSIBLY be not "G rated" and it turns out apparently that word isn't okay)
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» There has since been 5 posts. Last posting by , May 2 2:49 am

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