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put an aggressive dog to sleep? HELP!

Whether a dog dies, is lost or stolen, or must be placed in a new home, this is the place to gather together to give and receive love and support when you experience the loss of a beloved dog.

  
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Zeus

Zeus the- protector!
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 11, '06 6:47pm PST 
We had a dog (Zeus) that we could not trust around anyone. He would never give any signals, such as, growling, tucked tail, laid back ears that he was going to go after someone. Instead he would wag his tail, ears would be up and alert, he would act like he was just so happy to see that person. Then he would try to go after them. He was great with my husband, the kids & me. Never did anything wrong to any of us, we just could never trust him with anyone else.
So we put up a privacy fence so he could have plenty of exercise, etc. Whenever we took him out of our yard or house, he was always on leash and he always wore a muzzle. There were never any exceptions to this, no matter what. Always leashed & muzzled.
But to get to the point, he was perfectly happy with this routine. We had our Zeus for 14 1/2 years.
It might work for you too.

Edited by author Fri Aug 11, '06 6:52pm PST

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ZOYA

Zoya -Our- Family's- Guardian
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 11, '06 9:30pm PST 
I agree with Cypress-Your dog thinks he is the leader and protecting you. I had a similar problem with Zoya, my Chow/Shepherd when she was about 8. The vet checked her for neurological problems, etc. and we decided it was behavorial. Very similar pattern here except she occasionally tried to bully me, too! I did the same thing you did only there wasn't an organized Dogster.com then. However, I got a response from a Guard Dog Trainer of Rottweilers and he told me to send Zoya to K-9 Camp! What he meant was to put her through a training at home that he emailed me the manual for. It took 3 weeks and she was a different dog! and I was back in charge. We had lapses every few years but then it was my fault, not hers. So back we would go to K-9 Camp! If you want, email me and I will explain in detail. Zoya was always on a leash in public and I didn't take her places with strangers-I didn't get her to be a social dog but she never bit anybody maliciously but did intimidate quite a few people until I got a handle on this. I also always had a fenced or enclosed area for her. She never went out without the leash but she freaked out with the muzzle so I didn't use it. You might also think about getting some Rescue Remedy for her to put in her water to ease her anxiety around people. I also though I was going to have to put her down and was just a mess with the thought of it until that trainer emailed me. I had Zoya for 13 1/2 yrs. She has been gone 1 year today and I miss her incredibly. Good Luck and try K-9 Camp before you give up on your furry kid.
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Max

Take it to the- Max.
 
 
Barked: Sat Aug 12, '06 5:37pm PST 
Max was the same way, thank God he hasn't hurt other people but being a cattledog, he tends to herd his people. He gets grumpy with the kids when they get ready for school in the morning and had at one time chased them up chairs and wouldn't let them back on the floor. When his daddy scolded him for that, he bit his daddy's finger which required stitches. We took him to the vet (Max, not his dad), his Dad was convinced he needed to be put down. On the way over (the vet is across the street from us), his Daddy thought maybe putting him down is too harsh. So we said maybe we should have him neutered, the vet also said getting a trainer will help him calm down. The trainer we hired said he was nervous being out on the streets because the sounds of cars, dogs, people, leaves, etc... was so unfamiliar to him, which leads to aggression because he feels he needs to defend himself/he doesn't trust anything. When the trainer took him for walks and noticed that Max starts to stiffen up for any reason, he bent over and gave him a pet and/or a belly rub and would reassure him in a calm, low voice that it was okay. He's 95% better now when he goes for walks, and 100% better when it comes to intimidating the kids. The combination of neutering and trainer sessions helped. He still shows aggression to passers-by when he's behind the fence; as soon as they get over to his side of the fence, they're immediately his friend, especially if they pet him.
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Kiki

Jugar, jugar,- correr,- brincar...- dormir.
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 13, '06 12:31am PST 
I like the muzzle idea. A cousin have a pittbull that snarls at people, and heres theres no such thing as animal behaviorist, and trainers are so expensive.
I have the huntch is an alpha thing, if necesary yell at him when you tell orders, so he gets you are the boss, some dogs have a really high level of tolerance that you have to figure. It doesnt matter if some times you pass that limit.

At the end if nothings works...
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Thomas- Pickles

Who, me?
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 13, '06 7:43pm PST 
We took in Tom about 6 years ago. We were his third home; his first was abusive. He had major issues. He would snap at us for no reason, he would attack our other dog, you name it. 6 years later
and with the help of Bark Busters training, he is a much better behaved dog. Not perfect, mind you, but better. He still has his moments, he still snaps at us occasionally, and if he is in our car and someone approaches, even someone he is familiar with, he'll want to rip their head off. The solution? We make sure the windows are up when we are stationary somewhere. My point is, most dogs have quirks; things that set them off just as certain things set us humans off. The solution is to know what sets off your dog and try to prevent their unwanted behavior before it happens. For example, Tom was terrible walking on a leash, and if he saw another dog out on a walk, he would growl and want to run full steam ahead to get to the other dog. Out trainer told us to be very aware of our surroundings and when we saw another dog, we should immediately snap Tom out of his frozen, focused stance with leash and voice commands. It worked. If we could get his attention, and use commands before he got too focused on the other dog, we could literally prevent him from growling, barking and pulling to get to the other dog. We were thrilled!
I strongly suggest you seek professional help from a trainer or behaviorist to deal with this problem. We could not take Tom to the dog park prior to our training, and now we can take him and he does great with the other dogs. We could barely walk him on a leash, now we can. He would jump on every person who came in our home (very embarassing), now he doesn't. Keep in mind, the training can be hard work and takes time, but the payoff is worth more than anything. Good luck to you!
p.s. Our Nina, who is an absolute sweetheart of a dog, DESPISES children. I have no idea why, we have had her since 10 weeks old.
Just another example that even a "perfect" dog can have a quirk.
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Thomas- Pickles

Who, me?
 
 
Barked: Sun Aug 13, '06 7:48pm PST 
Kiki,
I have to disagree that there is no such thing as an animal behaviorist, and trainers are not all expensive. I paid $400 for my two dogs for an entire year of training. I would have paid a considerable amount more if I had to; I would do just about anything for my dogs.
Also, yelling is exactly what you do not want to do to a dog in this situation. It will get you nowhere. Speaking in a firm, deep voice, yes; yelling, no.
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tufferthanba- tman

359308
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 14, '06 7:14am PST 
With all due respect, I think you have missed the point. Dogs everywhere bite. We all hold liability because we are dog owners. I once new a trainer who had a very well behaved dog. Never bit anyone. He said when he is out with his dog and somebody comes up to him and asks “Does your dog bite?” He replies, “all dogs bite” He is right. You simple can never trust a dog 100% In one of your threads (Baby Dozer) you stated that you agreed that she should put the dog down. Well why if, there isn’t a money issue, or a time issue wouldn’t you give training a try first? If we simply put down every dog that bit someone then there wouldn’t be any dogs. Putting the dog down should be the last resort. In the mean time the dog shouldn’t be around strangers.
As far as your question, Being mauled and bitten are two different things. She didn’t claim that her dog mauled someone. If my child was mauled I would put the dog down. Also, if my dog bites one of your kids then I’m at fault no matter what.. That’s the cost and responsibility of owning a dog. I don’t every remembering going to court and seeing a dog as a defendant. My friend had a dog in his backyard. The sign on the fence read “Beware of Dog” The mailman reached over the fence to pet the dog and got bit. He sued my friend.
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Baby Bull Dozer

slobber and- slime. Its o.k.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 14, '06 12:47pm PST 
To the owner of Jake. After 12 or 13 pages of responses. You have seen all kinds of different responses. You will be the one who has to make the final decision and just remeber. You can never please everyone. You have to do what you think is best regardless of what we think. Because you love your dog it will probably be the best choice for you, Jake and your family. You know him better than we do.
GOODLUCK !!
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Baby Bull Dozer

slobber and- slime. Its o.k.
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 14, '06 12:47pm PST 
oopps!! I mean 7 pages.
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tufferthanba- tman

359308
 
 
Barked: Mon Aug 14, '06 1:25pm PST 
I wonder what she decided?
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