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New rescue Wheaten, advice appreciated

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Member Since
07/28/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Jul 28, '12 12:22pm PST 
Hello:

I would love some advice from Wheaten owners. My husband and I just adopted a 7 month old male Wheaten, Griffin, from a local rescue 8 days ago. His previous family was loving, but did not have the time to train him since they had young children.

We have been taking Griffin for 1-2 walks a day, enrolled and attended our first obedience class, and practiced training with him. We've also tried to engage him in games like frisbee. My husband and I have been gentle but firm with Griffin in enforcing rules around the house and telling him "no" when he playbites us, gets into something he shouldn't be, or otherwise misbehaves. Griffin tries to challenge us frequently, often repeatedly after he is corrected.

Here's the situation: we've heard that Wheatens are friendly, playful, and devoted dogs. However, Griffin mostly ignores us. He will often sit in the same room, but if we attempt to pet him, he will typically get up and move a few feet away. He does not want to play with us, despite the fact that prior to his arrival we know he was incredibly energetic and playful. He does eat and responds pretty well to treat based training.

I understand this may be part of an adjustment period, or possibly a result of his adolescent age, but I'm concerned that his mood has changed so dramatically. Obviously, we want to do everything we can to help Griffin take to us and become part of our "pack." Is this normal? Anyone have any similar experiences? Any suggestions or thoughts are welcome and appreciated. Thanks for your time.
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Annie

I know I'm cute- rub my belly!
 
 
Barked: Sun Jul 29, '12 10:40am PST 
8 days is not to long. Just keep working with him it should improve. Annie didn't really warm up to me for a few weeks and didn't eat a bite till day 3 and was still ignoring her food till I put some gravy on it. In fact she didn't even eat again after that for another day and a half. She wouldn't really be super playful or affectionate at first she just would just lay on the tile part of the floor and watch me. I think she was just trying to figure out her place in a new situation. Good luck though and hopefully things work out for you and Griffin.
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Member Since
07/28/2012
 
 
Barked: Sat Aug 11, '12 7:14pm PST 
Thanks for the response. Very much appreciated. We have been giving Griffin his space for the last couple weeks. We walk him twice a day and do try to play (sometimes he plays and mostly he just stares at us while we throw things or run around or lay on the floor and cheer him on excitedly).

He is very independent and prefers to do what he wants. We are practicing obedience. When he is in obedience mode (we stand in front of him with treats) he generally listens. When we are just asking him to come to us during daily activities or in the evening, he ignores us.

Is this independence/indifference a breed trait, if anyone knows? We really are trying our best to bond with him.
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Member Since
08/31/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Aug 31, '12 11:43am PST 
Is this Griffin that was listed on Pet Finder from Omaha, NE? If so omg what a cutie!! smile I actually have his picture on my computer lol. My fiance and I have a 16 month old male Wheaten named Nelson. I would eventually like to adopt a rescue wheaten so every now and then I get on pet finder and browse around. But when I saw Griffin he melted my heart. He looks so much like my Nelson, in a way broke my heart. I hoped he would find a good home. Sounds like he has! smile

Now to your question, he is still young and his probably still adjusting to his new home. I think giving him time and unconditional love will help. Wheatens are known to be stubborn too. I love to cuddle so Nelson didn't have a chance at not being a cuddly dog lol. It also requires trust. I can remember when Nels was a little puppy he used to freak out when I tried to get his eye boogers out, he would wine like I was really hurting him. Over time he learned to trust me and now he just stands there quietly while I pick them out lol.

Good luck to you and please post some pics! smile
- Ashley
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Member Since
10/26/2012
 
 
Barked: Fri Oct 26, '12 9:03am PST 
Patience for the first few years; might try an obedience class when he gets a little older which I didn't do; they are pretty independent and full of life. Mine never did well on a leash and still wanted to do his own thing later in life; I just lost him so want another but need to wait until ready because the puppy years are a handful. I did crate train mine for when he needed time out as a pup. Teach the word "no" clearly; that's the one command that he came to respect the most. Physical punishment not a good idea; mine only got spanked on his bottom twice in his life; Good Luck they are great dogs. Great travel companion. I'll miss mine a lot.
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Member Since
03/30/2011
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 14, '12 5:02am PST 
I know it has been awhile since you posted. I have not been on here in a long time. I am the owner of a Wheaten. Oliver is my second Wheaten and I consider myself pretty knowledgeable about them. My first, Gunner was from I think kind of a puppy mill. Not from a store. He came from a breeder in Nebraska and now the information that I have leads me to believe that the dogs there were overbred. He got an extremely rare disease which affects very few Wheatens. He was only seven when he passed. We spent nearly $3000 to save him. Our vet was not very informative on how to help him . He was diagnosed with cancer. Please read about PLN and PLE. Wheatens are highly susceptible to allergies which has a lot to do with these diseases. There is a doctor by the name of Merrill Littman who helped me to learn about this. She teaches at a university that studies this breed. Every Wheaten owner should learn about nutrition. I feed my dogs grain-free food and treats. They get no people food other than fruits and vegetables. Again remember these diseases are extremely rare, but food allergies can cause so many other problems like skin rashes, hot spots, and gas. Oliver is our second Wheaten. He is 1 1/2 yrs. old. I traveled 3 hours to pick him up from a breeder that knew of these diseases and he was from a first liter. I know your baby was a rescue. Oliver is quite different in temperament than Gunnner. I don't think this has anything to do with where they came from. If you watch you tube videos, they all have the same traits. They all do the "Wheaten Greetin". They jump and lick and kiss. Neither of my wheatens listened or listen! They ignore. They are headstrong! They do not retrieve although we did get Gunner to bring a ball back. I have had no luck with Oliver bringing anything back. He comes in when he hears the dogtreat jar open. Gunner was aggressive He did not like small children or certain men. I had to watch him carefully around strangers. Oliver loves everyone. He is timid around strangers but curious. He needs a minute to get use to someone. Gunner followed me around and laid next to me on the floor or the foot of the bed where Oliver likes to be next to me. He also loves our other dog, Lucas, a rescue mixed lab. He dominates him and rounds him up like a sheep when it is time to go out. He nips at his ears to get him to come. Lucas loves to be dominated. I have not used any professional training. I don't mind the jumping or licking. It is part of who they are. I use small dogtreats to train them to sit or come in the house. We have a fenced in yard so I don't have to worry about them getting out and taking off. Gunner was a runner and would bolt if given the chance. Oliver will stay away from the gate if I tell him, "you stay". I can bring the groceries in and he listens. Gunner was chased down many times and actually got hit by a van. No injuries thank goodness. He liked to chase the wheels on the cars. He chased anything that moved. Especially squirrels and cats! I highly recommend blood tests to determine what they are allergic to. I also believe in grain-free foods and treats to stay away from possible allergies. I had switched their food to a new brand of grain-free food. There was nothing in in to cause allergies and yet Oliver was allergic to something in the food that caused him to get infections in both ears and lose hair above his eye and one of his back paws. His foot was swollen and red. He lost 3 lbs. When I switched him back to his other food and then finally to a new food again, we were finally able to get rid of the infections in his ears. His skin healed and he is doing great! There is not a governing body to determine what is listed on dog food packaging. I use a dry food from a company called Merrick. It is a duck and potato based gran-free food. When you start reading about dog food you learn a lot. A good website is dog food reviews. That is where I learned so much. This is the third brand of food I have tried. Next summer when the weather changes we will know for sure if it is the right one. I live in Michigan and the summer months bring fleas which is a whole other problem. The best advice I can give you is to learn about nutrition and watch The Dog Whisperer. I have not tried his techniques but, I am thinking they would work if there are issues in training. Treats work! Enjoy! I would get another one in a heartbeat!
[notify]


Member Since
03/30/2011
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 14, '12 5:04am PST 
I know it has been awhile since you posted. I have not been on here in a long time. I am the owner of a Wheaten. Oliver is my second Wheaten and I consider myself pretty knowledgeable about them. My first, Gunner was from I think kind of a puppy mill. Not from a store. He came from a breeder in Nebraska and now the information that I have leads me to believe that the dogs there were overbred. He got an extremely rare disease which affects very few Wheatens. He was only seven when he passed. We spent nearly $3000 to save him. Our vet was not very informative on how to help him . He was diagnosed with cancer. Please read about PLN and PLE. Wheatens are highly susceptible to allergies which has a lot to do with these diseases. There is a doctor by the name of Merrill Littman who helped me to learn about this. She teaches at a university that studies this breed. Every Wheaten owner should learn about nutrition. I feed my dogs grain-free food and treats. They get no people food other than fruits and vegetables. Again remember these diseases are extremely rare, but food allergies can cause so many other problems like skin rashes, hot spots, and gas. Oliver is our second Wheaten. He is 1 1/2 yrs. old. I traveled 3 hours to pick him up from a breeder that knew of these diseases and he was from a first liter. I know your baby was a rescue. Oliver is quite different in temperament than Gunnner. I don't think this has anything to do with where they came from. If you watch you tube videos, they all have the same traits. They all do the "Wheaten Greetin". They jump and lick and kiss. Neither of my wheatens listened or listen! They ignore. They are headstrong! They do not retrieve although we did get Gunner to bring a ball back. I have had no luck with Oliver bringing anything back. He comes in when he hears the dogtreat jar open. Gunner was aggressive He did not like small children or certain men. I had to watch him carefully around strangers. Oliver loves everyone. He is timid around strangers but curious. He needs a minute to get use to someone. Gunner followed me around and laid next to me on the floor or the foot of the bed where Oliver likes to be next to me. He also loves our other dog, Lucas, a rescue mixed lab. He dominates him and rounds him up like a sheep when it is time to go out. He nips at his ears to get him to come. Lucas loves to be dominated. I have not used any professional training. I don't mind the jumping or licking. It is part of who they are. I use small dogtreats to train them to sit or come in the house. We have a fenced in yard so I don't have to worry about them getting out and taking off. Gunner was a runner and would bolt if given the chance. Oliver will stay away from the gate if I tell him, "you stay". I can bring the groceries in and he listens. Gunner was chased down many times and actually got hit by a van. No injuries thank goodness. He liked to chase the wheels on the cars. He chased anything that moved. Especially squirrels and cats! I highly recommend blood tests to determine what they are allergic to. I also believe in grain-free foods and treats to stay away from possible allergies. I had switched their food to a new brand of grain-free food. There was nothing in in to cause allergies and yet Oliver was allergic to something in the food that caused him to get infections in both ears and lose hair above his eye and one of his back paws. His foot was swollen and red. He lost 3 lbs. When I switched him back to his other food and then finally to a new food again, we were finally able to get rid of the infections in his ears. His skin healed and he is doing great! There is not a governing body to determine what is listed on dog food packaging. I use a dry food from a company called Merrick. It is a duck and potato based gran-free food. When you start reading about dog food you learn a lot. A good website is dog food reviews. That is where I learned so much. This is the third brand of food I have tried. Next summer when the weather changes we will know for sure if it is the right one. I live in Michigan and the summer months bring fleas which is a whole other problem. The best advice I can give you is to learn about nutrition and watch The Dog Whisperer. I have not tried his techniques but, I am thinking they would work if there are issues in training. Treats work! Enjoy! I would get another one in a heartbeat!
[notify]


Member Since
03/30/2011
 
 
Barked: Wed Nov 14, '12 5:06am PST 
I know it has been awhile since you posted. I have not been on here in a long time. I am the owner of a Wheaten. Oliver is my second Wheaten and I consider myself pretty knowledgeable about them. My first, Gunner was from I think kind of a puppy mill. Not from a store. He came from a breeder in Nebraska and now the information that I have leads me to believe that the dogs there were overbred. He got an extremely rare disease which affects very few Wheatens. He was only seven when he passed. We spent nearly $3000 to save him. Our vet was not very informative on how to help him . He was diagnosed with cancer. Please read about PLN and PLE. Wheatens are highly susceptible to allergies which has a lot to do with these diseases. There is a doctor by the name of Merrill Littman who helped me to learn about this. She teaches at a university that studies this breed. Every Wheaten owner should learn about nutrition. I feed my dogs grain-free food and treats. They get no people food other than fruits and vegetables. Again remember these diseases are extremely rare, but food allergies can cause so many other problems like skin rashes, hot spots, and gas. Oliver is our second Wheaten. He is 1 1/2 yrs. old. I traveled 3 hours to pick him up from a breeder that knew of these diseases and he was from a first liter. I know your baby was a rescue. Oliver is quite different in temperament than Gunnner. I don't think this has anything to do with where they came from. If you watch you tube videos, they all have the same traits. They all do the "Wheaten Greetin". They jump and lick and kiss. Neither of my wheatens listened or listen! They ignore. They are headstrong! They do not retrieve although we did get Gunner to bring a ball back. I have had no luck with Oliver bringing anything back. He comes in when he hears the dogtreat jar open. Gunner was aggressive He did not like small children or certain men. I had to watch him carefully around strangers. Oliver loves everyone. He is timid around strangers but curious. He needs a minute to get use to someone. Gunner followed me around and laid next to me on the floor or the foot of the bed where Oliver likes to be next to me. He also loves our other dog, Lucas, a rescue mixed lab. He dominates him and rounds him up like a sheep when it is time to go out. He nips at his ears to get him to come. Lucas loves to be dominated. I have not used any professional training. I don't mind the jumping or licking. It is part of who they are. I use small dogtreats to train them to sit or come in the house. We have a fenced in yard so I don't have to worry about them getting out and taking off. Gunner was a runner and would bolt if given the chance. Oliver will stay away from the gate if I tell him, "you stay". I can bring the groceries in and he listens. Gunner was chased down many times and actually got hit by a van. No injuries thank goodness. He liked to chase the wheels on the cars. He chased anything that moved. Especially squirrels and cats! I highly recommend blood tests to determine what they are allergic to. I also believe in grain-free foods and treats to stay away from possible allergies. I had switched their food to a new brand of grain-free food. There was nothing in in to cause allergies and yet Oliver was allergic to something in the food that caused him to get infections in both ears and lose hair above his eye and one of his back paws. His foot was swollen and red. He lost 3 lbs. When I switched him back to his other food and then finally to a new food again, we were finally able to get rid of the infections in his ears. His skin healed and he is doing great! There is not a governing body to determine what is listed on dog food packaging. I use a dry food from a company called Merrick. It is a duck and potato based gran-free food. When you start reading about dog food you learn a lot. A good website is dog food reviews. That is where I learned so much. This is the third brand of food I have tried. Next summer when the weather changes we will know for sure if it is the right one. I live in Michigan and the summer months bring fleas which is a whole other problem. The best advice I can give you is to learn about nutrition and watch The Dog Whisperer. I have not tried his techniques but, I am thinking they would work if there are issues in training. Treats work! Enjoy! I would get another one in a heartbeat!
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